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Genève, Switzerland

Herrmann C.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | Herrmann C.,Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute | Herrmann C.,University of Basel | Cerny T.,Kantonsspital St. Gallen | And 6 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2013

Background: Cancer survivors are a heterogeneous group with complex health problems. Data concerning its total number and growing dynamics for Switzerland are scarce and outdated.Methods: Population and mortality data were retrieved from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (FSO). Incidence and relative survival for invasive cancers were computed using data from the cancer registries Geneva (1970-2009), St. Gallen - Appenzell (1980-2010), Grisons & Glarus (1989-2010), and Valais (1989-2010). We estimated prevalence for 1990-2010 using the Prevalence, Incidence Approach MODel (PIAMOD) method. We calculated trends in prevalence estimates by Joinpoint analysis. Projections were extrapolated using the above models and based on time trends of the period 2007-2010.Results: The estimated number of cancer survivors increased from 139′717 in 1990 (2.08% of the population) to 289′797 persons in 2010 (3.70%). The growth rate shows an exponential shape and was 3.3% per year in the period 2008 to 2010. Almost half of the survivors have a history of breast, prostate or colorectal cancer. Among cancer survivors, 55% are women but the increases have been more marked in men (p < 0.01, 3.9% annual increase in men vs. 2.7% in women since 2008). By the end of 2020 372′000 cancer survivors are expected to live in Switzerland.Conclusions: There is a rapidly growing population of cancer survivors in Switzerland whose needs and concerns are largely unknown. © 2013 Herrmann et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Joerger M.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | Ess S.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | Savidan A.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | Bouchardy C.,Geneva Cancer Registry | And 3 more authors.
Swiss Medical Weekly | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: There is considerable heterogeneity in the use of chemotherapy in early breast cancer (BC), despite international recommendations issued from the NCCN, NIH and the St.Gallen bi-annual conference. METHODS: We included 1,535 patients from seven Swiss cancer registries between 2003 and 2005 receiving chemotherapy for stage I to III BC. Chemotherapy was categorised into (a) FAC/FEC, anthracyclines followed by CMF or anthracycline-taxane combinations (FAC-T) (781 patients) and (b) other chemotherapy regimens such as CMF/AC (EC) (754 patients). Predictors for choosing FAC-T over non-FAC-T chemotherapy were separately determined in all patients and in ER-negative patients (n = 496) by multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The use of FAC-T increased significantly over time, from 44% in 2003 to 55% in 2005. BC stage III (versus stage I-II) and nodal positivity were the predominant predictors for using FAC-T chemotherapy in the adjusted model (odds ratio (OR) 4.1, 95%-confidence intervals (CI) 2.6-6.3 and OR 3.0, 95%-CI 2.0-4.4, respectively). In high-risk ER-negative BC patients, poor histological differentiation was more important to choose FAC-T chemotherapy (OR 3.8, 95%-CI 1.9-7.5) than tumour stage or nodal status. The use of FAC-T chemotherapy varied substantially among the seven geographic regions, from 20% in rural Grisons-Glarus to 73% in Zurich. CONCLUSIONS: Tumour biology is a predominant factor for choosing FAC-T over older chemotherapy regimens in patients with ER-negative early BC, but improvements should be made to reduce the substantial regional heterogeneity. Further epidemiological studies should assess how the use of FAC-T chemotherapy is affecting clinical outcome in patients with early BC and different risk profiles. Source


Conway D.I.,University of Glasgow | McKinney P.A.,NHS NSS ISD | McKinney P.A.,University of Leeds | McMahon A.D.,University of Glasgow | And 28 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2010

Introduction: In the European Union, there are 180,000 new cases of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer cases per year - more than half of whom will die of the disease. Socioeconomic inequalities in UADT cancer incidence are recognised across Europe. We aimed to assess the components of socioeconomic risk both independently and through their influence on the known behavioural risk factors of smoking, alcohol consumption and diet. Patients and methods: A multicentre case-control study with 2198 cases of UADT cancer and 2141 controls from hospital and population sources was undertaken involving 14 centres from 10 countries. Personal interviews collected information on demographics, lifetime occupation history, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet. Socioeconomic status was measured by education, occupational social class and unemployment. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. Results: When controlling for age, sex and centre significantly increased risks for UADT cancer were observed for those with low versus high educational attainment OR = 1.98 (95% CI 1.67, 2.36). Similarly, for occupational socioeconomic indicators - comparing the lowest versus highest International Socio-Economic Index (ISEI) quartile for the longest occupation gave OR = 1.60 (1.28, 2.00); and for unemployment OR = 1.64 (1.24, 2.17). Statistical significance remained for low education when adjusting for smoking, alcohol and diet behaviours OR = 1.29 (1.06, 1.57) in the multivariate analysis. Inequalities were observed only among men but not among women and were greater among those in the British Isles and Eastern European countries than in Southern and Central/Northern European countries. Associations were broadly consistent for subsite and source of controls (hospital and community). Conclusion: Socioeconomic inequalities for UADT cancers are only observed among men and are not totally explained by smoking, alcohol drinking and diet. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Thurlimann B.,Breast Center | Frick H.,Cancer Registry Grisons Glarus | Rageth C.,Brust Zentrum Seefeld | Lutolf U.,University of Zurich | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Geriatric Oncology | Year: 2013

Objectives: The primary objective of this population-based study is to describe the patterns of care of elderly patients with breast cancer (BC), and evaluate potential causative factors for the decrease in BC-specific survival (BCSS) in the elderly. Patients and Methods: We included all or representative samples of patients with newly diagnosed BC from seven Swiss cancer registries between 2003 and 2005 (n=4820). Surgical and non-surgical BC treatment was analyzed over 5 age groups (<65, 65 to <70, 70 to <75, 75 to <80 and ≥80. years), and the predictive impact of patient age on specific treatments was calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: The proportion of locally advanced, metastatic and incompletely staged BC increased with age. The odds ratio for performing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in stages I-II BC (0.37), sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in patients with no palpable adenopathy (0.58), post-BCS radiotherapy (0.04) and adjuvant endocrine treatment (0.23) were all in disfavor of patients ≥80. years of age compared to their younger peers. Only 36% of patients ≥80. years of age with no palpable adenopathy underwent SLND. In the adjusted model, higher age was a significant risk factor for omitting post-BCS radiotherapy, SLND and adjuvant endocrine treatment. Conclusions: This study found an increase in incomplete diagnostic assessment, and a substantial underuse of BCS, post-BCS radiotherapy, SLND and adjuvant endocrine treatment. in elderly patients with BC. There is a need for improved management of early BC in the elderly even in a system with universal access to health care services. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Marron M.,Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz | Boffetta P.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Boffetta P.,International Prevention Research Institute | Moller H.,Kings College London | And 29 more authors.
European Journal of Epidemiology | Year: 2012

The general relationship between cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) and alcohol drinking is established. Nevertheless, it is uncertain whether different types of alcoholic beverages (wine, beer and liquor) carry different UADT cancer risks. Our study included 2,001 UADT cancer cases and 2,125 controls from 14 centres in 10 European countries. All cases were histologically or cytologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas. Controls were frequency matched by sex, age and centre. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 %CI) adjusted for age, sex, centre, education level, vegetable and fruit intake, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking, where appropriate. Risk of beverage-specific alcohol consumption were calculated among 'pure drinker' who consumed one beverage type exclusively, among 'predominant drinkers' who consumed one beverage type to more than 66 % and among 'mixed drinkers' who consumed more than one beverage type to similar proportions. Compared to never drinkers and adjusted for cumulative alcohol consumption, the OR and 95 %CI for wine, beer and liquor drinking, respectively, were 1.24 (0.86, 1.78), 1.54 (1.05, 2.27) and 0.94 (0.53, 1.64) among 'pure drinkers' (p value for heterogeneity across beverage types = 0.306), 1.05 (0.76,1.47), 1.25 (0.87,1.79) and 1.43 (0.95, 2.16) among 'predominant drinkers' (p value = 0.456), and 1.09 (0.79, 1.50), 1.20 (0.88, 1.63) and 1.12 (0.82, 1.53) among 'mixed drinkers' (p value = 0.889). Risk of UADT cancer increased with increasing consumption of all three alcohol beverage types. Our findings underscore the strong and comparable carcinogenic effect of ethanol in wine, beer and liquor on organs of the UADT. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012. Source

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