Geneva Cancer Registry

Genève, Switzerland

Geneva Cancer Registry

Genève, Switzerland
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Herrmann C.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | Herrmann C.,Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute | Herrmann C.,University of Basel | Cerny T.,Kantonsspital St. Gallen | And 7 more authors.
BMC Cancer | Year: 2013

Background: Cancer survivors are a heterogeneous group with complex health problems. Data concerning its total number and growing dynamics for Switzerland are scarce and outdated.Methods: Population and mortality data were retrieved from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office (FSO). Incidence and relative survival for invasive cancers were computed using data from the cancer registries Geneva (1970-2009), St. Gallen - Appenzell (1980-2010), Grisons & Glarus (1989-2010), and Valais (1989-2010). We estimated prevalence for 1990-2010 using the Prevalence, Incidence Approach MODel (PIAMOD) method. We calculated trends in prevalence estimates by Joinpoint analysis. Projections were extrapolated using the above models and based on time trends of the period 2007-2010.Results: The estimated number of cancer survivors increased from 139′717 in 1990 (2.08% of the population) to 289′797 persons in 2010 (3.70%). The growth rate shows an exponential shape and was 3.3% per year in the period 2008 to 2010. Almost half of the survivors have a history of breast, prostate or colorectal cancer. Among cancer survivors, 55% are women but the increases have been more marked in men (p < 0.01, 3.9% annual increase in men vs. 2.7% in women since 2008). By the end of 2020 372′000 cancer survivors are expected to live in Switzerland.Conclusions: There is a rapidly growing population of cancer survivors in Switzerland whose needs and concerns are largely unknown. © 2013 Herrmann et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Truong T.,International Agency for Research on Cancer | Truong T.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Hung R.J.,Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute | Amos C.I.,University of Houston | And 57 more authors.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute | Year: 2010

Background Genome-wide association studies have identified three chromosomal regions at 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21 as being associated with the risk of lung cancer. To confirm these associations in independent studies and investigate heterogeneity of these associations within specific subgroups, we conducted a coordinated genotyping study within the International Lung Cancer Consortium based on independent studies that were not included in previous genome-wide association studies. Methods Genotype data for single-nucleotide polymorphisms at chromosomes 15q25 (rs16969968, rs8034191), 5p15 (rs2736100, rs402710), and 6p21 (rs2256543, rs4324798) from 21 case-control studies for 11645 lung cancer case patients and 14954 control subjects, of whom 85% were white and 15% were Asian, were pooled. Associations between the variants and the risk of lung cancer were estimated by logistic regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Associations between 15q25 and the risk of lung cancer were replicated in white ever-smokers (rs16969968: odds ratio [OR] = 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21 to 1.32, Ptrend = 2 × 10-26), and this association was stronger for those diagnosed at younger ages. There was no association in never-smokers or in Asians between either of the 15q25 variants and the risk of lung cancer. For the chromosome 5p15 region, we confirmed statistically significant associations in whites for both rs2736100 (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.20, Ptrend = 1 × 10 -10) and rs402710 (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.19, Ptrend = 5 × 10-8) and identified similar associations in Asians (rs2736100: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.35, Ptrend = 2 × 10 -5; rs402710: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.27, Ptrend =. 007). The associations between the 5p15 variants and lung cancer differed by histology; odds ratios for rs2736100 were highest in adenocarcinoma and for rs402710 were highest in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas. This pattern was observed in both ethnic groups. Neither of the two variants on chromosome 6p21 was associated with the risk of lung cancer. Conclusion sIn this international genetic association study of lung cancer, previous associations found in white populations were replicated and new associations were identified in Asian populations. Future genetic studies of lung cancer should include detailed stratification by histology. © 2010 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press.


Joerger M.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | Joerger M.,Cantonal Hospital | Ess S.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | Dehler S.,Cancer Registry Zurich | And 5 more authors.
Swiss Medical Weekly | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: There is considerable heterogeneity in the use of chemotherapy in early breast cancer (BC), despite international recommendations issued from the NCCN, NIH and the St.Gallen bi-annual conference. METHODS: We included 1,535 patients from seven Swiss cancer registries between 2003 and 2005 receiving chemotherapy for stage I to III BC. Chemotherapy was categorised into (a) FAC/FEC, anthracyclines followed by CMF or anthracycline-taxane combinations (FAC-T) (781 patients) and (b) other chemotherapy regimens such as CMF/AC (EC) (754 patients). Predictors for choosing FAC-T over non-FAC-T chemotherapy were separately determined in all patients and in ER-negative patients (n = 496) by multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The use of FAC-T increased significantly over time, from 44% in 2003 to 55% in 2005. BC stage III (versus stage I-II) and nodal positivity were the predominant predictors for using FAC-T chemotherapy in the adjusted model (odds ratio (OR) 4.1, 95%-confidence intervals (CI) 2.6-6.3 and OR 3.0, 95%-CI 2.0-4.4, respectively). In high-risk ER-negative BC patients, poor histological differentiation was more important to choose FAC-T chemotherapy (OR 3.8, 95%-CI 1.9-7.5) than tumour stage or nodal status. The use of FAC-T chemotherapy varied substantially among the seven geographic regions, from 20% in rural Grisons-Glarus to 73% in Zurich. CONCLUSIONS: Tumour biology is a predominant factor for choosing FAC-T over older chemotherapy regimens in patients with ER-negative early BC, but improvements should be made to reduce the substantial regional heterogeneity. Further epidemiological studies should assess how the use of FAC-T chemotherapy is affecting clinical outcome in patients with early BC and different risk profiles.


Conway D.I.,University of Glasgow | McKinney P.A.,NHS NSS ISD | McKinney P.A.,University of Leeds | McMahon A.D.,University of Glasgow | And 28 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2010

Introduction: In the European Union, there are 180,000 new cases of upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancer cases per year - more than half of whom will die of the disease. Socioeconomic inequalities in UADT cancer incidence are recognised across Europe. We aimed to assess the components of socioeconomic risk both independently and through their influence on the known behavioural risk factors of smoking, alcohol consumption and diet. Patients and methods: A multicentre case-control study with 2198 cases of UADT cancer and 2141 controls from hospital and population sources was undertaken involving 14 centres from 10 countries. Personal interviews collected information on demographics, lifetime occupation history, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet. Socioeconomic status was measured by education, occupational social class and unemployment. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using unconditional logistic regression. Results: When controlling for age, sex and centre significantly increased risks for UADT cancer were observed for those with low versus high educational attainment OR = 1.98 (95% CI 1.67, 2.36). Similarly, for occupational socioeconomic indicators - comparing the lowest versus highest International Socio-Economic Index (ISEI) quartile for the longest occupation gave OR = 1.60 (1.28, 2.00); and for unemployment OR = 1.64 (1.24, 2.17). Statistical significance remained for low education when adjusting for smoking, alcohol and diet behaviours OR = 1.29 (1.06, 1.57) in the multivariate analysis. Inequalities were observed only among men but not among women and were greater among those in the British Isles and Eastern European countries than in Southern and Central/Northern European countries. Associations were broadly consistent for subsite and source of controls (hospital and community). Conclusion: Socioeconomic inequalities for UADT cancers are only observed among men and are not totally explained by smoking, alcohol drinking and diet. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Joerger M.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | Joerger M.,Cantonal Hospital | Thurlimann B.,Cantonal Hospital | Savidan A.,Cancer Registry St. Gallen Appenzell | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Geriatric Oncology | Year: 2013

Objectives: The primary objective of this population-based study is to describe the patterns of care of elderly patients with breast cancer (BC), and evaluate potential causative factors for the decrease in BC-specific survival (BCSS) in the elderly. Patients and Methods: We included all or representative samples of patients with newly diagnosed BC from seven Swiss cancer registries between 2003 and 2005 (n=4820). Surgical and non-surgical BC treatment was analyzed over 5 age groups (<65, 65 to <70, 70 to <75, 75 to <80 and ≥80. years), and the predictive impact of patient age on specific treatments was calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: The proportion of locally advanced, metastatic and incompletely staged BC increased with age. The odds ratio for performing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in stages I-II BC (0.37), sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in patients with no palpable adenopathy (0.58), post-BCS radiotherapy (0.04) and adjuvant endocrine treatment (0.23) were all in disfavor of patients ≥80. years of age compared to their younger peers. Only 36% of patients ≥80. years of age with no palpable adenopathy underwent SLND. In the adjusted model, higher age was a significant risk factor for omitting post-BCS radiotherapy, SLND and adjuvant endocrine treatment. Conclusions: This study found an increase in incomplete diagnostic assessment, and a substantial underuse of BCS, post-BCS radiotherapy, SLND and adjuvant endocrine treatment. in elderly patients with BC. There is a need for improved management of early BC in the elderly even in a system with universal access to health care services. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Verhoeven R.H.A.,Comprehensive Cancer Center South | Gondos A.,German Cancer Research Center | Janssen-heijnen M.L.G.,Comprehensive Cancer Center South | Janssen-heijnen M.L.G.,Viecuri Medical Center | And 17 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2013

Background: Despite high curability, some testicular cancer (TC) patient groups may have increased mortality. We provide a detailed age- and histology-specific comparison of population-based relative survival of TC patients in Europe and the USA. Design: Using data from 12 European cancer registries and the USA Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results 9 database, we report survival trends for patients diagnosed with testicular seminomas and nonseminomas between 1993-1997 and 2003-2007. Additionally, a model-based analysis was used to compare survival trends and relative excess risk (RER) of death between Europe and the USA adjusting for differences in age and histology. Results: In 2003-2007, the 5-year relative survival of patients with testicular seminoma was at least 98% among those aged <50 years, survival of patients with nonseminoma remained 3%-6% units lower.Despite improvements in the relative survival of nonseminoma patients aged ≥50 years by 13%-18% units, survival remained markedly lower than the survival of seminoma patients of the same age. Model-based analyses showed increased RERs for nonseminomas, older, and European patients. Conclusions: There remains little room for survival improvement among testicular seminoma patients, especially for those aged <50 years. Older TC patients remain at increased risk of death, which seems mainly attributable to the lower survival among the nonseminoma patients. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


Merlo D.F.,IRCCS AOU San Martino IST Instituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro | Ceppi M.,IRCCS AOU San Martino IST Instituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro | Filiberti R.,IRCCS AOU San Martino IST Instituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro | Bocchini V.,IRCCS AOU San Martino IST Instituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro | And 6 more authors.
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment | Year: 2012

An increase in the incidence of breast cancer in women aged <40 years has been reported in recent years. Increased incidence could be partly explained by subtle detection biases, but the role of other risk factors cannot be ruled out. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the changes in temporal trends in breast cancer incidence in European women aged 20-39 years at diagnosis. Age specific breast cancer incidence rates for 17 European Cancer Registries were retrieved for the calendar period 1995-2006. Cancer registries data were pooled to reduce annual fluctuations present in single registries and increase incidence rates stability. Regression models were fitted to the data assuming that the number of cancer cases followed the Poisson distribution. Mean annual changes in the incidence rate (AIC) across the considered time window were calculated. The AIC estimated from all European registries was 1.032 (95 % CI = 1.019-1.045) and 1.014 (95 % CI = 1.010-1.018) in women aged 20-29 and 30-39 years old at diagnosis, respectively. The major change was detected among women aged 25-29 years at diagnosis: AIC = 1.033 (95 % CI = 1.020-1.046). The upward trend was not affected when registries with high or low AIC were removed from the analysis (sensitivity analysis). Our findings support the presence of an increase in the incidence of breast cancer in European women in their 20s and 30s during the decade 1995-2006. The interpretation of the observed increase is not straightforward since a number of factors may have affected our results. The estimated annual increase in breast cancer incidence may result in a burden of the disease that is important in terms of public health and deserves further investigation of possible risk factors. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Neppl-Huber C.,German Cancer Research Center | Zappa M.,Clinical and Descriptive Epidemiology Unit | Coebergh J.W.,Erasmus University Rotterdam | Rapiti E.,Geneva Cancer Registry | And 16 more authors.
Annals of Oncology | Year: 2012

Background: We describe changes in prostate cancer incidence, survival and mortality and the resulting impact in additional diagnoses and avoided deaths in European areas and the United States. Methods: Using data from 12 European cancer registries and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, we describe changes in prostate cancer epidemiology between the beginning of the PSA era (USA: 1985-1989, Europe: 1990-1994) and 2002-2006 among patients aged 40-64, 65-74, and 75+. Additionally, we examine changes in yearly numbers of diagnoses and deaths and variation in male life expectancy. Results: Incidence and survival, particularly among patients aged <75, increased dramatically, yet both remain (with few exceptions in incidence) lower in Europe than in the United States. Mortality reductions, ongoing since the mid/late 1990s, were more consistent in the United States, had a distressingly small absolute impact among patients aged 40-64 and the largest absolute impact among those aged 75+. Overall ratios of additional diagnoses/avoided deaths varied between 3.6 and 27.6, suggesting large differences in the actual impact of prostate cancer incidence and mortality changes. Ten years of remaining life expectancy was reached between 68 and 76 years. Conclusion: Policies reflecting variation in population life expectancy, testing preferences, decision aids and guidelines for surveillance-based management are urgently needed. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved.


Sant M.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Allemani C.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Tereanu C.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | De Angelis R.,Instituto Superiore Of Sanita | And 54 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2010

Changing definitions and classifications of hematologic malignancies (HMs) complicate incidence comparisons. HAEMACARE classified HMs into groupings consistent with the latest World Health Organization classification and useful for epidemiologic and public health purposes. We present crude, age-specific and age-standardized incidence rates for European HMs according to these groupings, estimated from 66 371 lymphoid malignancies (LMs) and 21 796 myeloid malignancies (MMs) registered in 2000-2002 by 44 European cancer registries, grouped into 5 regions. Age-standardized incidence rates were 24.5 (per 100 000) for LMs and 7.55 for MMs. The commonest LMs were plasma cell neoplasms (4.62), small B-cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphatic leukemia (3.79), diffuse B-cell lymphoma (3.13), and Hodgkin lymphoma (2.41). The commonest MMs were acute myeloid leukemia (2.96), other myeloproliferative neoplasms (1.76), and myelodysplastic syndrome (1.24). Unknown morphology LMs were commonest in Northern Europe (7.53); unknown morphology MMs were commonest in Southern Europe (0.73). Overall incidence was lowest in Eastern Europe and lower in women than in men. For most LMs, incidence was highest in Southern Europe; for MMs incidence was highest in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Differences in diagnostic and registration criteria are an important cause of incidence variation; however, different distribution of HM risk factors also contributes. The quality of population-based HM data needs further improvement. © 2010 by The American Society of Hematology.

Loading Geneva Cancer Registry collaborators
Loading Geneva Cancer Registry collaborators