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Cangul H.,Bahcesehir University | Dogan M.,Yuzuncu Yil University | Saglam Y.,Center for Genetic Diagnosis | Boelaert K.,University of Birmingham | Barrett T.G.,University of Birmingham
JCRPE Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology | Year: 2014

Objective: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most common neonatal endocrine disorder and mutations in the TPO gene have been reported to cause CH. Our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of CH in two affected individuals coming from a consanguineous family.Methods: Since CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multi-case families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the candidate genes. First, we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus using microsatellite markers and then screened for mutations in linkedgene by Sanger sequencing.Results: The family showed potential linkage to the TPO gene and we detected a deletion (c.2422delT) in both cases. The mutation segregated with disease status in the family.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that a single base deletion in the carboxyl-terminal coding region of the TPO gene could cause CH and helps to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation associated with the mutation. The study also highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and accurate classification of CH. © Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, Published by Galenos Publishing. Source


Cangul H.,Bahcesehir University | Bas V.N.,SAMI Health | Saglam Y.,Center for Genetic Diagnosis | Kendall M.,University of Sfax | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2014

Congenital hypothyroidism (CH), one of the most important preventable causes of mental retardation, is a clinical condition characterized by thyroid hormone deficiency in newborns. CH is most often caused by defects in thyroid development leading to thyroid dysgenesis. The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the main known gene causing thyroid dysgenesis in consanguineous families with CH. In this study, we aim to determine the genetic alteration in a case with congenital hypothyroidism and heart defects coming from a consanguineous family. We utilized genetic linkage analysis and direct sequencing to achieve our aim. Our results revealed that the family showed linkage to the TSHR locus, and we detected a homozygous nonsense mutation (R609X) in the case. Apart from other cases with the same mutation, our case had accompanying cardiac malformations. Although cardiac malformations are not uncommon in sporadic congenital hypothyroidism, here, they are reported for the first time with R609X mutation in a familial case. © by De Gruyter 2014. Source


Cangul H.,Bahcesehir University | Aycan Z.,SAMI Health | Kendall M.,University of Sfax | Bas V.N.,SAMI Health | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2014

Mutations in DUOX2 have been reported to cause congenital hypothyroidism (CH), and our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of CH in two affected individuals coming from a consanguineous family. Because CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multicase families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the candidate genes. First, we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus using microsatellite markers and then screened for mutations in linked genes by Sanger sequencing. The family showed potential linkage to DUOX2 locus and we detected a nonsense mutation (R434X) in both cases and the mutation segregated with disease status in the family. This study highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and classification of CH, and it also suggests a new clinical testing strategy using next-generation sequencing in all primary CH cases. © 2014 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston 2014. Source


Cangul H.,Bahcesehir University | Darendeliler F.,Istanbul University | Saglam Y.,Center for Genetic Diagnosis | Kucukemre B.,Istanbul University | And 4 more authors.
Endocrine Research | Year: 2015

Absract Purpose: Mutations in the TPO gene have been reported to cause congenital hypothyroidism (CH), and our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of congenital hypothyroidism in two affected children coming from a consanguineous family. Methods: Since CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multi case-families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the candidate genes. First we investigated the potential genetic linkage of the family to any known CH locus using microsatellite markers and then screened for mutations in linked-gene by Sanger sequencing. Results: The family showed potential linkage to the TPO gene and we detected a non-sense mutation (Y55X) in both cases that had total iodode organification defect (TIOD). The mutation segregated with disease status in the family. Y55X is the only truncating mutation in the exon 2 of the TPO gene reported in the literature and results in the earliest stop codon known in the gene to date. Conclusions: This study confirms the pathogenicity of Y55X mutation and demonstrates that a nonsense mutation in the amino-terminal coding region of the TPO gene could totally abolish the function of the TPO enzyme leading to TIOD. Thus it helps to establish a strong genotype/phenotype correlation associated with this mutation. It also highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and accurate classification of CH. © 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted. Source


Cangul H.,Bahcesehir University | Boelaert K.,University of Birmingham | Dogan M.,Yuzuncu Yil University | Saglam Y.,Center for Genetic Diagnosis | And 3 more authors.
Endocrine | Year: 2014

Mutations in the thyroglobulin (TG) gene have been reported to cause congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and we have been investigating the genetic architecture of CH in a large cohort of consanguineous/multi-case families. Our aim in this study was to determine the genetic basis of CH in four affected individuals coming from two separate consanguineous families. Since CH is usually inherited in autosomal recessive manner in consanguineous/multi-case families, we adopted a two-stage strategy of genetic linkage studies and targeted sequencing of the TG gene. First we investigated the potential genetic linkage of families to any known CH locus using microsatellite markers and then determined the pathogenic mutations in linked-genes by Sanger sequencing. Both families showed potential linkage to TG locus and we detected two previously unreported nonsense TG mutations (p.Q630X and p.W637X) that segregated with the disease status in both families. This study highlights the importance of molecular genetic studies in the definitive diagnosis and classification of CH, and also adds up to the limited number of nonsense TG mutations in the literature. It also suggests a new clinical testing strategy using next-generation sequencing in all primary CH cases. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York. Source

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