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Qayyum R.,GeneSTAR Research Program | Ziv E.,University of California at San Francisco | Nalls M.A.,U.S. National Institute on Aging | Liu Y.,Wake forest University | And 19 more authors.
PLoS Genetics | Year: 2012

Several genetic variants associated with platelet count and mean platelet volume (MPV) were recently reported in people of European ancestry. In this meta-analysis of 7 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) enrolling African Americans, our aim was to identify novel genetic variants associated with platelet count and MPV. For all cohorts, GWAS analysis was performed using additive models after adjusting for age, sex, and population stratification. For both platelet phenotypes, meta-analyses were conducted using inverse-variance weighted fixed-effect models. Platelet aggregation assays in whole blood were performed in the participants of the GeneSTAR cohort. Genetic variants in ten independent regions were associated with platelet count (N = 16,388) with p<5×10 -8 of which 5 have not been associated with platelet count in previous GWAS. The novel genetic variants associated with platelet count were in the following regions (the most significant SNP, closest gene, and p-value): 6p22 (rs12526480, LRRC16A, p = 9.1×10 -9), 7q11 (rs13236689, CD36, p = 2.8×10 -9), 10q21 (rs7896518, JMJD1C, p = 2.3×10 -12), 11q13 (rs477895, BAD, p = 4.9×10 -8), and 20q13 (rs151361, SLMO2, p = 9.4×10 -9). Three of these loci (10q21, 11q13, and 20q13) were replicated in European Americans (N = 14,909) and one (11q13) in Hispanic Americans (N = 3,462). For MPV (N = 4,531), genetic variants in 3 regions were significant at p<5×10 -8, two of which were also associated with platelet count. Previously reported regions that were also significant in this study were 6p21, 6q23, 7q22, 12q24, and 19p13 for platelet count and 7q22, 17q11, and 19p13 for MPV. The most significant SNP in 1 region was also associated with ADP-induced maximal platelet aggregation in whole blood (12q24). Thus through a meta-analysis of GWAS enrolling African Americans, we have identified 5 novel regions associated with platelet count of which 3 were replicated in other ethnic groups. In addition, we also found one region associated with platelet aggregation that may play a potential role in atherothrombosis. Source


Chen Z.,University of Arizona | Tang H.,Stanford University | Qayyum Q.,GeneSTAR Research Program | Schick U.M.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | And 39 more authors.
Human Molecular Genetics | Year: 2013

Laboratory red blood cell (RBC) measurements are clinically important, heritable and differ among ethnic groups. To identify genetic variants that contribute to RBC phenotypes in African Americans (AAs), we conducted a genome-wide association study in up to ~16 500 AAs. The alpha-globin locus on chromosome 16pter [lead SNP rs13335629 in ITFG3 gene; P < 1E-13 for hemoglobin (Hgb), RBC count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), MCH and MCHC] and the G6PD locus on Xq28 [lead SNP rs1050828; P < 1E - 13 for Hgb, hematocrit (Hct), MCV, RBC count and red cell distribution width (RDW)] were each associated with multiple RBC traits. At the alpha-globin region, both the common African 3.7 kb deletion and common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) appear to contribute independently to RBC phenotypes among AAs. In the 2p21 region, we identified a novel variant of PRKCE distinctly associated with Hct in AAs. In a genome-wide admixture mapping scan, local European ancestry at the 6p22 region containing HFE and LRRC16A was associated with higher Hgb. LRRC16A has been previously associated with the platelet count and mean platelet volume in AAs, but not with Hgb. Finally, we extended to AAs the findings of association of erythrocyte traits with several loci previously reported in Europeans and/or Asians, including CD164 and HBS1L-MYB. In summary, this large-scale genome-wide analysis in AAs has extended the importance of several RBC-associated genetic loci to AAs and identified allelic heterogeneity and pleiotropy at several previously known genetic loci associated with blood cell traits in AAs. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Source


Elbers C.C.,University of Pennsylvania | Elbers C.C.,University Utrecht | Guo Y.,Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia | Tragante V.,University Utrecht | And 75 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Meta-analyses of European populations has successfully identified genetic variants in over 100 loci associated with lipid levels, but our knowledge in other ethnicities remains limited. To address this, we performed dense genotyping of ~2,000 candidate genes in 7,657 African Americans, 1,315 Hispanics and 841 East Asians, using the IBC array, a custom ~50,000 SNP genotyping array. Meta-analyses confirmed 16 lipid loci previously established in European populations at genome-wide significance level, and found multiple independent association signals within these lipid loci. Initial discovery and in silico follow-up in 7,000 additional African American samples, confirmed two novel loci: rs5030359 within ICAM1 is associated with total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p = 8.8×10-7 and p = 1.5×10-6 respectively) and a nonsense mutation rs3211938 within CD36 is associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels (p = 13.5×10-12). The rs3211938-G allele, which is nearly absent in European and Asian populations, has been previously found to be associated with CD36 deficiency and shows a signature of selection in Africans and African Americans. Finally, we have evaluated the effect of SNPs established in European populations on lipid levels in multi-ethnic populations and show that most known lipid association signals span across ethnicities. However, differences between populations, especially differences in allele frequency, can be leveraged to identify novel signals, as shown by the discovery of ICAM1 and CD36 in the current report. © 2012 Elbers et al. Source


Yanek L.R.,GeneSTAR Research Program | Moy T.F.,GeneSTAR Research Program | Becker L.C.,GeneSTAR Research Program | Becker L.C.,Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions | And 7 more authors.
Cerebrovascular Diseases | Year: 2014

Background: African Americans (AAs) have a higher prevalence of extreme ischemic white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) than do European Americans (EAs) based on the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) score. Ischemic white matter disease, limited to the deep white matter, may be biologically distinct from disease in other regions and may reflect a previously observed trend toward an increased risk of subcortical lacunar infarcts in AAs. We hypothesized that extreme deep WMH volume (DWMV) or periventricular volume (PV) may also have a higher prevalence in AAs. Thus, we studied extreme CHS scores and extreme DWMV and PV in a healthy population enriched for cardiovascular disease risk factors. Methods: We imaged the brains of 593 subjects who were first-degree relatives of probands with early onset coronary disease prior to 60 years of age. WMHs were manually delineated on 3-tesla cranial MRI by a trained radiology reader; the location and volume of lesions were characterized using automated software. DWMV and PV were measured directly with automated software, and the CHS score was determined by a neuroradiologist. Volumes were characterized as being in the upper 25% versus lower 75% of total lesion volume. Volumes in the upper versus the remaining quartiles were examined for AA versus EA race using multiple logistic regression (generalized estimating equations adjusted for family relatedness) and adjusted for major vascular disease risk factors including age ≥55 years versus <55, sex, current smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes and low-density lipoprotein >160 mg/dl. Results: Participants were 58% women and 37% AAs, with a mean age of 51.5 ± 11.0 years (range, 29-74 years). AAs had significantly higher odds of having extreme DWMVs (odds ratio, OR, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.2-2.9; p = 0.0076) independently of age, sex, hypertension and all other risk factors. AAs also had significantly higher odds of having extreme CHS scores ≥3 (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6; p = 0.025). Extreme PV was not significantly associated with AA race (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.81-2.1; p = 0.26). Conclusions: AAs from families with early-onset cardiovascular disease are more likely to have extreme DWMVs (a subclinical form of cerebrovascular disease) and an extreme CHS score, but not extreme PV, independently of age and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. These findings suggest that this AA population is at an increased risk for DWMV and may be at an increased risk for future subcortical stroke. Longitudinal studies are required to see if DWMV is predictive of symptomatic subcortical strokes in this population. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. Source

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