Kuwait City, Kuwait
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Abdallah S.A.,General Science Unit | Abdallah S.A.,Ain Shams University | Al-Shatti L.A.,General Science Unit | Al-Shatti L.A.,Ain Shams University | And 4 more authors.
SpringerPlus | Year: 2013

This study aims to investigate the application of a fast electronic nose system (Cyranose 320) for detecting foodborne bacteria. The system proved to be very efficient in detecting microbes in beef and sausage samples. In the first part of the study, the total viable counts (TVC) from fresh and frozen beef samples were determined using the standard microbiological method and by the application of the electronic nose. The second part applied the electronic nose to beef before and after contamination with different bacterial pathogens separately: E. coli O157: H7, Salmonellatyphimurium 857, Staphylococcus aureus 29213 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27853. The results revealed that the Cyranose 320 can detect the TVC in different beef and sausage samples and quantify the volatile organic compounds produced at concentrations from 50 ppb to > 350 ppb. The concentrations of gases collected from the samples before and after separate contamination with these pathogenic bacteria were highly significantly correlated (P < 0.005). From this study one can conclude that the electronic nose system is a rapid way for detecting volatile organic compounds produced by foodborne bacteria that contaminate beef. © 2013 Abdallah et al.; licensee Springer.


PubMed | General Science Unit
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of water and health | Year: 2011

Microorganisms that have been identified in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) are of concern because they can cause infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. This study aimed to assess the incidence of microbial contamination in DUWLs before and after intervention to reduce contamination, and to investigate the presence of coliforms, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Water samples were collected aseptically from the waterlines. The high-speed hand-piece and dental chair units were served by one distillation apparatus, which was fed by the potable tap water of four dental clinics. Different interventions were used: chlorination, flushing before clinics and between patients, draining at the end of the day, and freshly distilled water on a daily basis. There was a significant difference between the level of contamination in the high-speed hand-piece (1.5-2.7 log CFU/ml) and dental chair unit water (2.0-3.5 log CFU/ml). Coliforms (0.9%) E. coli (0.9%) and Pseudomonas (1.8%) were detected during 2008. This study indicates the need to monitor water quality regularly and prevent stagnation in DUWLs to reduce the number of viable bacteria to <100 CFU/ml. We recommend flushing the DUWL for 2 min before the first patient and for 10-20 s between patients, flushing the dental unit at the end of the day and draining it overnight to reduce the development of biofilms, and chlorination of the DUWLs.

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