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News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Bold IP Law Firm (SEATTLE, WA) partners with General Practice and Transactional Business Attorneys and Firms around the nation to help them add the powerful practice area of Patent Law to their repertoire. This win-win arrangement allows the host law firm to take on Patent Law cases for the first time, helping their current clients be fully served by keeping the intellectual property representation in-house. Up until now, these firms have had to simply refer out those types of cases – losing control over the subject and losing valuable connection with a client. By keeping these clients in-house, Bold IP Host Firms are able to serve these new technology clients by helping them with a multitude of transactional and business representation including entity formations, contract drafting, membership agreements, employment agreements, and the like. Announcing two new Of Counsel Partnerships, who signed just this April, 2017: Palacios Law Firm (SANTA ANA, CA) – Highly-talented Principal Attorney, Elio Palacios, has a multi-faceted transactional and litigation practice covering the entire state of California. “We are excited about bringing in the expertise of Bold IP,” said Elio Palacios Jr., founding attorney of Palacios Law Office. “This will be a great way to better service our clients’ intellectual property needs.” Aharoni Business Law (OAKLAND, CA) – Innovative Principal Attorney, Galia Aharoni leads a team of passionate attorneys serving small businesses in the greater Bay area. “Working with Bold IP feels like opening up a new door in my legal practice” said Galia, “I'm excited for the opportunity to provide an even greater depth of service for my clients.” According to a Bold IP Law Firm Official, they hope to grow their Of Counsel Network to over 100 firms by the end of 2017. If you are an attorney and would like to learn how you might be a part of this network, call 1-800-849-1913 or email info(at)boldip(dot)com.


Receive press releases from Novation Holdings Inc: By Email Michael Gelmon, CEO of Novation Holdings Inc. commented, "We are extremely excited to enter the FinTech space in service of one of the fastest growing markets in the US. Health care occupations will add 2.3 million jobs in the next 7 years, more than any other growth sector. Our FinTech enabled programs position the healthcare professional to meet capital needs required for growth, new medical technologies, staff and expansion." Mr. Gelmon further remarked, “The world of healthcare sector finance is ripe for innovation. Financial Technology has proven to disrupt the models of traditional lenders in other sectors by delivering credit and capital access more efficiently. We are confident that our most recent acquisition unquestionably represents a catalyst that will further the trend and drive the future potential earnings for the Company.” The “point and click” efficiency of the FaaS Platform allows busy medical professionals to apply for and receive credit lines of up to $50,000 using their business EIN, not their personal credit and access to lenders that loan against revenue, equipment and borrower strength, when traditional banks say no. Capital access is paramount to any sector’s growth and based on the current upward trend within the Health Care industry, the current and future need for finance should only accelerate the Novation’s income potential. Mr. Gelmon further stated, “Essentially, the function of Capital Resource Authority, Inc.’s and the FinTech as a Service platform, (FaaS), is to evolve the art of starting or expanding a medical professional office into a systematic program that can be efficiently repeated to produce well-funded medical professional business modalities by offering immediate access to 2000+ Alternative Lenders who say yes, when banks say no. Our FaaS single enterprise solution is poised to transform the health care provider’s access to capital and finance experience.” Boca Raton, FL, May 15, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Novation Holdings Inc., (OTC PINK SHEETS - NOHO), (the "Company"), has acquired 100% of Capital Resource Authority, Inc. with ability to offer a first of its kind cash and credit access system for providing capital to Healthcare providers nationwide to include every imaginable medical or dental related office. General Practice, podiatry, ENT, dermatology, home healthcare companies, rehab clinics, etc. Virtually any medical and dental professional office can qualify for our working capital financing solutions, medical and dental practice loans, and medical equipment leasing programs.Michael Gelmon, CEO of Novation Holdings Inc. commented, "We are extremely excited to enter the FinTech space in service of one of the fastest growing markets in the US. Health care occupations will add 2.3 million jobs in the next 7 years, more than any other growth sector. Our FinTech enabled programs position the healthcare professional to meet capital needs required for growth, new medical technologies, staff and expansion."Mr. Gelmon further remarked, “The world of healthcare sector finance is ripe for innovation. Financial Technology has proven to disrupt the models of traditional lenders in other sectors by delivering credit and capital access more efficiently. We are confident that our most recent acquisition unquestionably represents a catalyst that will further the trend and drive the future potential earnings for the Company.”The “point and click” efficiency of the FaaS Platform allows busy medical professionals to apply for and receive credit lines of up to $50,000 using their business EIN, not their personal credit and access to lenders that loan against revenue, equipment and borrower strength, when traditional banks say no. Capital access is paramount to any sector’s growth and based on the current upward trend within the Health Care industry, the current and future need for finance should only accelerate the Novation’s income potential.Mr. Gelmon further stated, “Essentially, the function of Capital Resource Authority, Inc.’s and the FinTech as a Service platform, (FaaS), is to evolve the art of starting or expanding a medical professional office into a systematic program that can be efficiently repeated to produce well-funded medical professional business modalities by offering immediate access to 2000+ Alternative Lenders who say yes, when banks say no. Our FaaS single enterprise solution is poised to transform the health care provider’s access to capital and finance experience.” Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Novation Holdings Inc


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study. Around two per cent of people over 40 -- up to half a million people in the UK -- have a raised blood platelet count -- known as thrombocytosis. Now, a study of 40,000 patient records led by the University of Exeter Medical School found that more than 11% of men and 6% of women over the age of 40 with thrombocytosis went on to be diagnosed with cancer within a year. This rose to 18% of men and 10% of women if a second raised platelet count was recorded within six months. In the general population, around 1% develop cancer in any one year. In the cohort analysed, of people who had been sent for a blood test by their GP, around 4% of men and 2% of women developed cancer. Lung and colorectal cancer were more commonly diagnosed with thrombocytosis. One-third of patients with thrombocytosis and lung or colorectal cancer had no other symptoms that would indicate to their GP that they had cancer. The paper, published in the British Journal of General Practice, calls for GPs to consider a diagnosis of cancer in patients with unexpected thrombocytosis, to increase early diagnosis which can save lives. Lead author Dr Sarah Bailey, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said: "We know that early diagnosis is absolutely key in whether people survive cancer. Our research suggests that substantial numbers of people could have their cancer diagnosed up to three months earlier if thrombocytosis prompted investigation for cancer. This time could make a vital difference in achieving earlier diagnosis." The research was carried out using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, which includes anonymised data from around 8% of UK general practices. The researchers compared records of patients aged 40 and over. They analysed 30,000 with thrombocytosis and 8,000 with normal blood platelet counts. They calculate that if only a conservative estimate of 5% of patients with cancer have thrombocytosis before a cancer diagnosis, one third of them have the potential to have their diagnosis expedited by at least three months by the identification of this risk marker, equating to 5,500 earlier diagnoses annually. The study has revealed the first new indicator of cancer to have been robustly identified in 30 years. The Exeter group specialises in identifying which symptoms predict cancer to aid early diagnosis, however most of their work centres around quantifying known risk markers. Thrombocytosis first arose when they were investigating other features, and the paper is the first to thoroughly investigate the association between thrombocytosis and undiagnosed cancer. Professor Willie Hamilton, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said: "The UK lags well behind other developed countries on early cancer diagnosis. In 2014, 163,000 people died of cancer in this country. Our findings on thrombocytosis show a strong association with cancer, particularly in men - far stronger than that of a breast lump for breast cancer in women. It is now crucial that we roll out cancer investigation of thrombocytosis. It could save hundreds of lives each year." Dr Ukoumunne is supported by the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care - South West Peninsula. The paper, 'Clinical relevance of thrombocytosis in primary care: a prospective cohort study of cancer incidence using English electronic medical records and cancer registry data' is published in the British Journal of General Practice. Authors are Sarah ER Bailey, Obioha C Ukoumunne, Elizabeth A Shephard and Willie Hamilton.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study. Around two per cent of people over 40 -- up to half a million people in the UK -- have a raised blood platelet count -- known as thrombocytosis. Now, a study of 40,000 patient records led by the University of Exeter Medical School found that more than 11% of men and 6% of women over the age of 40 with thrombocytosis went on to be diagnosed with cancer within a year. This rose to 18% of men and 10% of women if a second raised platelet count was recorded within six months. In the general population, around 1% develop cancer in any one year. In the cohort analysed, of people who had been sent for a blood test by their GP, around 4% of men and 2% of women developed cancer. Lung and colorectal cancer were more commonly diagnosed with thrombocytosis. One-third of patients with thrombocytosis and lung or colorectal cancer had no other symptoms that would indicate to their GP that they had cancer. The paper, published in the British Journal of General Practice, calls for GPs to consider a diagnosis of cancer in patients with unexpected thrombocytosis, to increase early diagnosis which can save lives. Lead author Dr Sarah Bailey, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said: "We know that early diagnosis is absolutely key in whether people survive cancer. Our research suggests that substantial numbers of people could have their cancer diagnosed up to three months earlier if thrombocytosis prompted investigation for cancer. This time could make a vital difference in achieving earlier diagnosis." The research was carried out using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, which includes anonymised data from around 8% of UK general practices. The researchers compared records of patients aged 40 and over. They analysed 30,000 with thrombocytosis and 8,000 with normal blood platelet counts. They calculate that if only a conservative estimate of 5% of patients with cancer have thrombocytosis before a cancer diagnosis, one third of them have the potential to have their diagnosis expedited by at least three months by the identification of this risk marker, equating to 5,500 earlier diagnoses annually. The study has revealed the first new indicator of cancer to have been robustly identified in 30 years. The Exeter group specialises in identifying which symptoms predict cancer to aid early diagnosis, however most of their work centres around quantifying known risk markers. Thrombocytosis first arose when they were investigating other features, and the paper is the first to thoroughly investigate the association between thrombocytosis and undiagnosed cancer. Professor Willie Hamilton, of the University of Exeter Medical School, said: "The UK lags well behind other developed countries on early cancer diagnosis. In 2014, 163,000 people died of cancer in this country. Our findings on thrombocytosis show a strong association with cancer, particularly in men -- far stronger than that of a breast lump for breast cancer in women. It is now crucial that we roll out cancer investigation of thrombocytosis. It could save hundreds of lives each year."


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Drugs such as statins that have the potential to prevent strokes and other types of cardiovascular disease have not been prescribed to a large proportion of people at risk in the UK, according to a research article by Grace Turner of the University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK and colleagues published in PLOS Medicine. Turner and colleagues studied data from THIN, a database that includes anonymized primary care health information for about 6% of the UK population. In an analysis of data from 29,043 people who had suffered a first-ever stroke or transient ischaemic attack during the period January 2009-December 2013, the authors compared the proportion of people prescribed one of three classes of drugs able to prevent strokes with the proportion of people who had a clinical need for one or more of the drugs. Among the patients, 17,680 were eligible to be prescribed at least one of the classes of drugs studied at the time of their stroke or transient ischaemic attack. The data indicate that 49% (7,836/16,028) of the patients were not prescribed a clinically-indicated lipid-lowering drug, such as a statin, 25% (1,740/7,008) were not prescribed anti-hypertensive drugs, and 52% (1,647/3,194) were not prescribed anticoagulant drugs. In this study, the reasons for drugs not being prescribed to individual patients--which could include those refusing medication -- were not available. However, the authors' findings suggest that improved prescribing could potentially avert up to 12,000 strokes per year in the UK. The study was funded by the National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research (NIHR SPCR). TM was partly funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) through the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for West Midlands (CLAHRC-WM). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. GMT reports grants from National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) School for Primary Care Research (SPCR), during the conduct of the study; TM reports funding from the NIHR through the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for West Midlands (CLAHRC-WM); MC reports funding from European Society of Cardiology & AFNET, and personal fees from Astellas Pharma, outside the submitted work. KC reports grants from Pfizer China, outside the submitted work. MGF and RR have nothing to disclose. Turner GM, Calvert M, Feltham MG, Ryan R, Fitzmaurice D, Cheng KK, et al. (2016) Under-prescribing of Prevention Drugs and Primary Prevention of Stroke and Transient Ischaemic Attack in UK General Practice: A Retrospective Analysis. PLoS Med 13(11): e1002169. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1002169 IN YOUR COVERAGE PLEASE USE THIS URL TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO THE FREELY AVAILABLE PAPER:


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Ammaar Abidi, DDS, General Dentist and Oral Surgeon to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Ammaar Abidi is a highly trained and qualified dentist with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially oral surgery, general, pediatric, and cosmetic dentistry, periodontal disease, endodontics, prosthodontics, and TMJ disorders. Dr. Abidi has been in practice for four years and is currently serving patients within American Family Dentistry in Germantown, Tennessee. Dr. Abidi attended the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry, where he graduated with his Doctor of Dental Surgery Degree in 2013, and is currently a PhD candidate for 2017. Dr. Abidi is certified by the American Board of General Dentistry, and keeps up to date with the latest advances and developments in his field by maintaining professional memberships with the International Association for Dental Research, the American Association for Dental Research, and the American Dental Association. Furthermore, Dr. Abidi serves as an Assistant Professor in the Department of General Practice Dentistry at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. In his free time, Dr. Abidi enjoys playing cricket. Learn more about Dr. Abidi by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews, and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit:http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The NHS Health Check program in England may have prevented an estimated 4,600 to 8,400 heart attacks, strokes, or death from these causes in its first five years, according to an independent review of the programme led by Queen Mary University of London The NHS Health Check programme in England may have prevented an estimated 4,600 to 8,400 heart attacks, strokes, or death from these causes in its first five years, according to an independent review of the programme led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The programme, which has in the past been considered 'controversial', led to an increase in diagnoses of 30 per cent for diabetes, 50 per cent for hypertension and 80 per cent for chronic kidney disease, and 40 per cent more statins were prescribed, but researchers say there is still room for improvement for treating those at higher risk. NHS Health Check started in 2009 and is the first programme in the world to tackle prevention of heart attacks and strokes by offering a free check to every adult aged 40-74 years. The scheme offers professional advice on lifestyle changes and treatments, including statins, to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. This study, published in the British Journal of General Practice, looked at the first five years of the NHS Health Check programme in three London areas (City & Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham) and found that: The introduction of this scheme was controversial, say study authors. Statins received adverse publicity and the programme's effectiveness was contested. This was largely based on a review of 16 trials of health checks, of which 12 were conducted before 1994 when neither statins nor modern antihypertensive drugs were in use. Study lead Dr John Robson from QMUL said: "Those who attended NHS Health Checks were substantially more likely to be found with a diagnosis of a new disease, including hypertension, diabetes and chronic kidney disease. We saw a 30 to 80 per cent increase in the number of disease cases found, compared to those who did not attend, and 40 per cent more people were prescribed statins, so these are very substantial gains in public health terms. "If you compare attendance levels with other programmes, such as the bowel screening programme, the coverage here is much better, so one would hope that would translate into earlier opportunities for greater protection for those people. However, there is still room for improvement for NHS Health Checks, especially in terms of ensuring even better treatments for those at higher risk." The study was funded by the Department of Health, but independently conducted. Joel Winston Public Relations Manager (School of Medicine and Dentistry) Queen Mary University of London j.winston@qmul.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 7943 / +44 (0)7970 096 188 Research paper: 'NHS Health Check comorbidity and management: an observational matched study in primary care'. John Robson, Isabel Dostal, Vichithranie Madurasinghe, Aziz Sheikh, Sally Hull, Kambiz Boomla, Chris Griffiths and Sandra Eldridge. British Journal of General Practice. Paper will appear online here after embargo lifts: http://bjgp. Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is one of the UK's leading universities, and one of the largest institutions in the University of London, with 21,187 students from more than 155 countries. A member of the Russell Group, we work across the humanities and social sciences, medicine and dentistry, and science and engineering, with inspirational teaching directly informed by our research. In the most recent national assessment of the quality of research, we were placed ninth in the UK (REF 2014). As well as our main site at Mile End - which is home to one of the largest self-contained residential campuses in London - we have campuses at Whitechapel, Charterhouse Square, and West Smithfield dedicated to the study of medicine, and a base for legal studies at Lincoln's Inn Fields. We have a rich history in London with roots in Europe's first public hospital, St Barts; England's first medical school, The London; one of the first colleges to provide higher education to women, Westfield College; and the Victorian philanthropic project, the People's Palace at Mile End. Today, as well as retaining these close connections to our local community, we are known for our international collaborations in both teaching and research. QMUL has an annual turnover of £350m, a research income worth £125m (2014/15), and generates employment and output worth £700m to the UK economy each year.


LEEDS, 16-Feb-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — GPs want more support when offering drugs that lower the risk of certain cancers, a new report by the University of Leeds and Cancer Research UK reveals. The report explores how much GPs know about two drugs that can reduce the risk of cancer – tamoxifen for women at high risk of breast cancer and aspirin for people with Lynch Syndrome, a condition that increases the risk of several types of cancer. It finds that GPs are more comfortable in discussing, and more willing to prescribe or recommend these drugs, if supported by secondary care clinicians. Since 2013, NICE has recommended tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer among women with a clear family history of the disease. But the report revealed that only around half of the 1,000 GPs surveyed knew that tamoxifen could be used in this way. Only 24 per cent were aware of the NICE familial breast cancer guidelines and 20 per cent of Scottish GPs were aware of similar Healthcare Innovation Scotland guidelines. Even with this low awareness, the report reveals that more than three-quarters of GPs were willing to prescribe tamoxifen, and many would be more comfortable if they knew a secondary care clinician had written the first prescription. In contrast, 73 per cent of GPs knew that aspirin could reduce the risk of bowel cancers in people who are not at high risk. But among GPs who had heard of Lynch Syndrome, just under half knew that aspirin could reduce the risk of cancers linked to the syndrome. The report makes a number of recommendations to ensure cancer preventing drugs are routinely discussed with, and offered, to the people who may benefit. It calls on NICE and NHS England (and national equivalents) to promote the evidence and existing guidance on chemoprevention along with the potential benefits and harms of these drugs. It highlights the role of Cancer Alliances in providing resources on chemoprevention for their regions – ensuring accurate information is provided for patients. The report’s author, Dr Samuel Smith – a Cancer Research UK fellow in the School of Medicine at the University of Leeds – said: “Our report helps us to understand GP attitudes towards the use of cancer preventing drugs. “It’s clear that more needs to be done to promote the evidence and guidance associated with these drugs, particularly as research reveals GPs are lacking the support to discuss effectively the risks and benefits of preventive therapy.” Professor Arnie Purushotham, Cancer Research UK’s senior clinical adviser, said: “Cancer-preventing drugs have the potential to have a huge impact by reducing the risk of cancer developing in the first place. “This report reveals that it’s vital that GPs are given the right support and information so they are confident to explore the value of these drugs with those who would benefit from them, wherever they are in the UK.” To help raise awareness of NICE guidelines, the Cancer Research UK Facilitator programme is highlighting them in their work with GPs on preventing cancer. Professor Purushotham added: “While this study focuses on reducing cancer risk, chemoprevention can also be used to reduce the risk of some cancers returning or spreading. “It’s essential that the NHS provides a clear steer to doctors to ensure all patients have equal access to treatments that could benefit them.” The findings looking at tamoxifen awareness are also published in the British Journal of General Practice. Dr Samuel Smith is available for interview. Please contact Sophie Freeman in the University of Leeds press office on 0113 343 8059 or email s.j.freeman@leeds.ac.uk


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Olugbenga Ayodeji Afilaka, MBBS, FRACGP, General Practitioner, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Olugbenga Ayodeji Afilaka is a highly trained and qualified physician with an extensive expertise in all facets of his work, especially family medicine. Dr. Afilaka has been in practice for more than 25 years and is currently serving patients within the Aveley Medical Center in Perth, Western Australia. Dr. Olugbenga Ayodeji Afilaka gained his Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery Degree in 1991. To keep up to date with the latest advances and developments in his field, Dr. Afilaka maintains a professional membership with the Australian Medical Association-General Practice and the Australian Wound Management Association. He has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, and is dedicated to providing the highest level of quality and compassionate care to his patients. Dr. Afilaka attributes his success to God and his hard work. In his free time, he enjoys traveling, as well as playing tennis and basketball. Learn more about Dr. Afilaka by reading his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In a new campaign, launched today (Thursday 23 February) in a special issue of The Lancet, the Academy of Medical Sciences will recognise the different people and diverse working styles currently operating in medical research in the UK. The campaign, called #MedSciLife, brings together the personal stories of those working in medical sciences to promote different working practices and inspire the next generation of scientists to develop dynamic, creative, and forward thinking approaches to the way they work. In doing this, the Academy is also urging researchers not to neglect outside interests when pursuing a career in science. Writing in a special issue of The Lancet timed to the Academy's spring meeting, Professor Robert Lechler PMedSci, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences said: "It is the Academy's view that time outside of work has the potential to nourish creativity, build resilience, and give fresh perspectives on existing problems, precisely the skills that result in the best quality research. A life outside science is not an extra, but an integral part of who we are as scientists." A new #MedSciLife website will provide a hub for medical researchers to describe their personal journeys and attempts to blend their work and home lives - providing a valuable resource for those currently working in the field and those considering medical science as a career. The Academy has also commissioned a series of photographic portraits of Fellows and early career researchers in their work and personal lives, which will be exhibited in the Academy's prestigious headquarters at 41 Portland Place, London. The positive impact of having interests outside of work on a research career was an important theme of the case studies collected for the #MedSciLife web resource, and is also highlighted as important by research in 2008 (Root-Bernstein 2008 and 1989)[4] that showed that Nobel prize winners were more likely than members of the public or other scientists to have long term hobbies. Professor Lechler, stresses the need for the #MedSciLife resource in his Lancet Comment: "Medical sciences are at the forefront of efforts to solve some of the biggest problems facing our society, including our ageing population, global poverty and health inequalities, and the impacts of climate change and antibiotic resistance. "If we are going to solve the problems facing us, more than ever we will need to attract and support the brightest and best minds. These scientists will need to be dynamic, creative, and forward thinking to deal with the complex challenges they face. "They will also work in an increasingly competitive landscape, and they will be tempted to believe that the key to success lies in working longer hours, and at the cost of sacrificing other interests. "I hope that MedSciLife will help those at all stages of their career to embrace the philosophy of celebrating different ways to blend life and work--giving us the chance to be the best we can now, and pave the way for an even better future." Professor Ann-Louise Kinmonth CBE FMedSci, Emeritus Professor of General Practice and Honorary Director of Research at the University of Cambridge, anther contributor, told us about ways she balances work and life and helps others doing so: "I tended to keep work and home pretty separate but now I invite students home more often. When they face a big loss or a big opportunity; talking things through and throwing a ball for my dog seem good antidotes to the stress." Professor Paul Martin FMedSci, Professor of Cell Biology at the University of Bristol, also offered an insight into how he found his work-life balance: "I find science pretty stressful and so I have several hobbies to 'escape' work; my pals who I fish with for bass, or at my Kung Fu club have no idea what REF or an impact factor is - and this is very good! "You have to love your science because the commitment required to be good and competitive is considerable - but you mustn't love it more than more important things like family and friends! "It is so easy to get caught up in the whirligig of a science career which is all consuming of as much of your time as you allow it, and some." Professor Catherine Law CBE FMedSci, Professor of Public Health and Epidemiology at the University College London, shared her advice to contribute to #MedSciLife: "Don't plan everything - leave some flexibility, at least in attitude, for the unexpected opportunity, the irresistible challenge, the slightly scary (but also exciting) request. Doing the next thing that is interesting and worthwhile is rarely a mistake." The #MedSciLife campaign supports the Academy of Medical Sciences' ongoing work to nurture the next generation of medical scientists. The Academy is committed to increasing diversity within medical science and have number of projects to support women researchers at critical points in their career, such as our pioneering SUSTAIN career development programme. Case studies, including for potential interviews, and the picture set are available under embargo upon request. For further information contact Giorgio De Faveri, Senior Press Officer, Academy of Medical Sciences, Giorgio.defaveri@acmedsci.ac.uk, 02031413206, 07885903528. 1. The Lancet Comments are available under the same embargo as the release upon request, and will be available online once the embargo lifts. 2. All #MedSciLife resources will be available at http://www. once the embargo lifts. 3. The Academy of Medical Sciences is the independent body in the UK representing the diversity of medical science. Our mission is to promote medical science and its translation into benefits for society. The Academy's elected Fellows are the United Kingdom's leading medical scientists from hospitals, academia, industry and the public service. We work with them to promote excellence, influence policy to improve health and wealth, nurture the next generation of medical researchers, link academia, industry and the NHS, seize international opportunities and encourage dialogue about the medical sciences. http://www. 4. References Robert S. Root-Bernstein, How scientists really think, Perspectives in biology and medicine, 32(4), Summer 1989. And Robert S. Root-Bernstein, Journal of Psychology of Science and Technology, 1 (2), 2008.

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