Detroit, MI, United States

General Motors

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Detroit, MI, United States

General Motors Company, commonly known as GM, is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Detroit, Michigan, that designs, manufactures, markets and distributes vehicles and vehicle parts and sells financial services. General Motors produces vehicles in 37 countries under thirteen brands: Alpheon, Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, Cadillac, Holden, HSV, Opel, Vauxhall, Wuling, Baojun, Jie Fang, UzDaewoo. General Motors holds a 20% stake in IMM, and a 77% stake in GM Korea. It also has a number of joint-ventures, including Shanghai GM, SAIC-GM-Wuling and FAW-GM in China, GM-AvtoVAZ in Russia, Ghandhara Industries in Pakistan, GM Uzbekistan, General Motors India, General Motors Egypt, and Isuzu Truck South Africa. General Motors employs 212,000 people and does business in more than 120 countries. General Motors is divided into five business segments: GM North America , Opel Group, GM International Operations , GM South America , and GM Financial.General Motors led global vehicle sales for 77 consecutive years from 1931 through 2007, longer than any other automaker, and is currently among the world's largest automakers by vehicle unit sales.General Motors acts in most countries outside the U.S. via wholly owned subsidiaries, but operates in China through 10 joint ventures. GM's OnStar subsidiary provides vehicle safety, security and information services.In 2009, General Motors shed several brands, closing Saturn, Pontiac and Hummer, and emerged from a government-backed Chapter 11 reorganization. In 2010, the reorganized GM made an initial public offering that was one of the world's top 5 largest IPOs to date and returned to profitability later that year. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

- Forecasts & analysis of the 5 automotive big data submarket revenues between 2016 and 2026 - ADAS / Autonomous - User Experience / Feature Tracking - Diagnostics - Location - Others ·         Overview and analysis of the role of standards and regulations - Analysis of the solutions and applications for automotive big data - SWOT analysis of the automotive big data market - Profiles of 10 leading companies involved in the automotive big data market as well as their automotive telematics product portfolio. - BMW AG - Daimler AG - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles - Ford Motor - General Motors - Honda Motor - Tesla Motors - Toyota - Volkswagen - Volvo ·         Key technologies analysed which are driving growth in automotive big data - Connected Car - Vehicle to Everything Telematics (V2X, V2I, V2P, V2G, V2V Communications, - Self-Driving Autonomous Vehicles (AV) - Usage-Based Insurance (UBI) - Pay As You Drive (PAYD) - Infotainment - The Internet of Things (IoT) To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/automotive-big-data-market-revenue-accounted-to-exceed-47-billion-in-2016-300444714.html


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Now in its 17th year, the event unites 3000 executives from across automotive technology, specifically those working on connected and autonomous technologies. The conference features high level speakers from Ford Smart Mobility, General Motors, Porsche Digital, Volkswagen and more, addressing key questions shaping the future of mobility such as autonomous cars, smart cities and the IoT. See the full program & line-up here: http://www.tu-auto.com/detroit/conference-agenda-full.php The exhibition includes live demos and autonomous test drives from companies including Bosch, Panasonic, Perrone Robotics, TomTom, and RideCell, enabling attendees to test new technologies. See the list of exhibitors here: http://www.tu-auto.com/detroit/exhibit-list.php Annie Reddaway, senior project director for TU-Automotive Detroit, stated: “We have never had a more senior line-up or a more exciting exhibition, a testament to the exciting developments in the automotive industry and the importance of the effect these technologies will have on society.” NB: TU-Automotive will verify press credentials. Analysts and consultants do not qualify for a press pass. Follow the conversation at #TUDetroit or get involved via detroit(at)tu-auto(dot)com or + 44 (0) 207 375 7585 / 1 800 814 3459 ext. 7585 About TU-Automotive: TU-Automotive is a world leader in providing events and business intelligence to the automotive technology community, covering telematics, mobility, autonomous vehicles and legal & insurance. You can sign up to receive free weekly updates, including exclusive industry analysis, interviews and insights at: http://www.tu-auto.com


LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Technavio’s latest report on the global engineering services outsourcing (ESO) market provides an analysis on the most important trends expected to impact the market outlook from 2016-2020. Technavio defines an emerging trend as a factor that has the potential to significantly impact the market and contribute to its growth or decline. Organizations outsource several business processes to service providers to provide more focus on core business offerings. Outsourcing brings down costs and innovation in product development. The services can be availed for various phases of product development process. Outsourcing can be key to organizations operating in industry verticals like automotive. It helps industries keep up with the rapidly changing technological landscape. The outsourcing decisions in organizations are very strategic in nature. Project managers mainly opt to outsource engineering services such as 3D modeling and computer-aided design (CAD). Digitization has triggered organizations to demand for advanced IT solutions such as engineering analytics, internet of things (IoT), and artificial intelligence (AI) to gain an edge over their competitors and maintain the momentum of the company. Technavio’s sample reports are free of charge and contain multiple sections of the report including the market size and forecast, drivers, challenges, trends, and more. The top four emerging trends driving the global engineering services outsourcing according to Technavio information and communications technology research analysts are: “Automation in engineering services has triggered the usage of artificial intelligence technology. AI-powered engineering solutions help to resolve various stages of design and development of engineering products. Automation in engineering services helps an organization to reduce cost by 35%-45%. Leading vendors in the market have invested in the development of engineering services powered by artificial intelligence technologies,” says Amit Sharma, one of the lead analysts at Technavio for IT professional services research. Machine learning, which is a part of AI systems, is recognized in the engineering services industry. Machine learning solutions integrated with analytical tools are transforming the industrial manufacturers' decision-making pathways. These solutions are also being developed by leading cloud computing firms such as Amazon Web Services and Microsoft. Penetration of industrial IoT in several industry verticals has increased significantly. Smart connected devices are aiding manufacturers to enable M2M communications. Industrial IoT services provide real-time information exchange to help industrial manufacturers to design and develop products. The industrial IoT services for ER&D opt to bring innovation in engineered products. Leading automotive companies such as GM, Nissan, and BMW are investing in building next generation autonomous cars. GM has invested USD 500 million in Lyft, a ride-sharing firm, to provide on-demand autonomous vehicles. Autonomous cars are designed and tested with the help of IoT technologies. “Leading IT vendors are entering the consulting space to engage with customers as a part of building strategic relationships. Engineering Service Outsourcing vendors require smart talent management and a comprehensive understanding of the client’s business. This will aid them to move to higher value consulting and establish long-term engagements,” says Amit. In line with the growing adoption of technology and associated engineering services, engineering outsourcing services (ESO) vendors need to offer high-end consulting services. This also helps clients gain expertise in technology and engineering to an extent. Consulting services are advisory services that help companies analyze and improve business operational performance and technology strategies. With increased adoption of social networking, mobile computing, online collaboration, cloud computing, and data storage, there is also an increased need for consulting services to manage the large complex networks. Currently, India is the most preferred location for ESO because of the highly skilled labor force and cost advantages. The Indian service providers win contracts from western countries including the US, the UK, and Germany because these reasons. This is leading to a significant growth in number of multi-national companies (MNCs) in India. The trend of MNCs setting up their own operational centers despite their high costs is on the rise. This makes them across as centers of excellence and the creators of high-end employment opportunities as opposed to the cost-arbitrage model of the past. The idea behind setting up captive centers is to put the diverse talent pool of India to good use, retain key data and information within the company, and propagate R&D activities through partners. Do you need a report on a market in a specific geographical cluster or country but can’t find what you’re looking for? Don’t worry, Technavio also takes client requests. Please contact enquiry@technavio.com with your requirements and our analysts will be happy to create a customized report just for you. Technavio is a leading global technology research and advisory company. The company develops over 2000 pieces of research every year, covering more than 500 technologies across 80 countries. Technavio has about 300 analysts globally who specialize in customized consulting and business research assignments across the latest leading edge technologies. Technavio analysts employ primary as well as secondary research techniques to ascertain the size and vendor landscape in a range of markets. Analysts obtain information using a combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches, besides using in-house market modeling tools and proprietary databases. They corroborate this data with the data obtained from various market participants and stakeholders across the value chain, including vendors, service providers, distributors, re-sellers, and end-users. If you are interested in more information, please contact our media team at media@technavio.com.


« Volvo Trucks used SuperTruck learnings to boost efficiency, performance in 2017 powertrains; wave piston, turbocompounding, injection | Main | DOE to offer up to $4.5M for research on methane hydrates » Three emerging and converging factors—connectivity, autonomy and transport-as-a-service—will fundamentally change the automotive industry over the next few decades, according to Mike Abelson, GM’s VP of Strategy and Global Portfolio Planning. These three factors, said Abelson in a panel talk at the 2016 SAE World Congress in Detroit, are changing how the vehicle interacts with the environment; how the user interacts with the vehicle; and the entire business structure around it. The basic DNA of the automotive industry—i.e., the way the vehicle operates and the supporting business structure—has remained more or less the same for the past 100 years. Automakers make most of their money by selling vehicles to individuals for personal transportation. I would ask you to think about the economic efficiency of our transportation system. An economist would make the point to all of us in this industry that an automobile is often-times the second-most valuable asset that a family owns and yet it sits unused 90% of the time. To an economist, that is a clear indication that there is an industry with a lot of potential for change. Sustainability and efficiency will continue to drive the industry, Abelson said. In his overview of the importance of electrification technologies, Abelson was much in alignment with Justin Ward from Toyota, with both of them referencing electrification as a spectrum of capabilities from stop-start to high-end battery-electric and fuel cell vehicles. While he touched on the “very geeky core engineering competencies talked about for number of years” of electrified propulsion and lightweighting, Abelson chose to focus more on the disruptors. Abelson noted that through OnStar, GM has been working with connectivity for some 20 years. The company now has 2.8 million vehicles on the road with 4G LTE connectivity. Last year, GM recorded some 133 million customer-OnStar interactions (100 million in North America, 33 million in China, 83,000 in Europe). More telling, however, is the growth: the 2015 data represented a doubling from 2014, which in turn represented a doubling from 2013. Here’s the sort of explosive growth that you hear talked about in the software industry, but not so much in our industry. I take this as a real indicator that this idea of connectivity, of giving customers connectivity to their vehicles but then going forward giving the vehicle connectivity to the wider Internet of Things is an important trend and one that will change how cars interact with their environment. Ridesharing is another disruptor. There are a lot of advantages to ridesharing, especially in urban areas, Abelson said, noting that the growth there has been explosive as well. Lyft in the US—in which GM recently made a $500-million investment (earlier post)—is up to 85 million rides in 2015. That pales in comparison to China’s DiDi, which supported 1.5 billion rides in 2015. Newcomer Ola in India is already up to 9 million rides, Abelson said. In September 2015, Lyft and DiDi announced a strategic partnership to enable Lyft users to use their Lyft app when they travel to China and Didi users to use their app when they travel to the US. DiDi also made a $100-million investment in Lyft. I emphasize that ridesharing is not going to replace personal vehicle ownership anytime soon. But it is sort of the point of the spear on the idea of transportation as a service and these changing business models. We think that the combination of these changing business models and some of these other technologies make for some very interesting opportunities going forward.


Deep learning can disrupt the roadmap of self-driving cars by accelerating toward level 4 autonomous drive, finds Frost & Sullivan's Mobility Team LONDON, Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Self-learning artificial intelligence (AI) in cars is the key to unlocking the capabilities of autonomous cars and enhancing value to end users through virtual assistance. It offers original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) fresh revenue streams through licensing, partnerships and new mobility services. Simultaneously, the use-case scenarios of self-learning AI in cars are drawing several technology companies, Internet of Things (IoT) companies and mobility service providers to the automotive industry. The technology has also attracted attention and investments from the government due to its potential to elevate lifestyles and add economic value. Frost & Sullivan's Automotive & Transportation Growth Partnership Service program, which offers, among other things insights into powertrains, carsharing and smart mobility management has recently released the following analyses of artificial intelligence in cars: Frost & Sullivan's new, Executive Analysis of Self-learning Artificial Intelligence in Cars, Forecast to 2025, aims to analyze self-learning car technology and its value contribution to the automotive industry. For complimentary access to more information on this analysis and to register for a Growth Strategy Dialogue, a free interactive briefing with Frost & Sullivan's thought leaders click here (http://frost.ly/19c) or send an email to Jana Schoeneborn (jana.schoeneborn@frost.com). By 2025, four levels of self-learning technology will disrupt the automotive industry. Level 4 self-learning car ownership will be vital for new mobility companies, stoking partnerships with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). OEMs are already making strategic investments or acquisitions for Level 3 and Level 4 self-learning technology; there are several prominent startups in the market. "Technology companies are expected to be the new Tier I for OEMs for deep-learning technology," said Frost & Sullivan Intelligent Mobility Research Analyst Sistla Raghuvamsi. "Google and NVIDIA will be key companies within this space, dominating the market by 2025. Meanwhile, 13 OEMs will be investing over $7.0 billion in the development of various AI use cases. Hyundai, Toyota, and GM will account for 53.4 percent of the total investment share." The challenge for technology developers lies in gathering the data required to train the AI to support self-driving capabilities. This is prompting the development of artificial simulations to run trained AI, as well as the creation of low-cost level 2 systems for driver analytics and assistance that can eventually provide data for levels 3 and 4. "High processing capability with low power consumption will be critical to enable various levels of self-learning cars," noted Raghuvamsi. "By 2025, level 4 self-learning cars will integrate home, work and commercial networks, enhancing the value to end users." Executive Analysis of Self-learning Artificial Intelligence in Cars, Forecast to 2025 is part of the Automotive & Transportation Growth Partnership Service program, which also includes insights on disruptive satellite communication, commercial vehicle telematics, driver monitoring systems, automotive interiors, wearables integration and head-up displays. Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Contact us: Start the discussion. Executive Analysis of Self-learning Artificial Intelligence in Cars, Forecast to 2025 K053-18


LONDON, Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Self-learning artificial intelligence (AI) in cars is the key to unlocking the capabilities of autonomous cars and enhancing value to end users through virtual assistance. It offers original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) fresh revenue streams through licensing, partnerships and new mobility services. Simultaneously, the use-case scenarios of self-learning AI in cars are drawing several technology companies, Internet of Things (IoT) companies and mobility service providers to the automotive industry. The technology has also attracted attention and investments from the government due to its potential to elevate lifestyles and add economic value. Frost & Sullivan's Automotive & Transportation Growth Partnership Service program, which offers, among other things insights into powertrains, carsharing and smart mobility management has recently released the following analyses of artificial intelligence in cars: Frost & Sullivan's new, Executive Analysis of Self-learning Artificial Intelligence in Cars, Forecast to 2025, aims to analyze self-learning car technology and its value contribution to the automotive industry. For complimentary access to more information on this analysis and to register for a Growth Strategy Dialogue, a free interactive briefing with Frost & Sullivan's thought leaders click here (http://frost.ly/19c) or send an email to Jana Schoeneborn (jana.schoeneborn@frost.com). By 2025, four levels of self-learning technology will disrupt the automotive industry. Level 4 self-learning car ownership will be vital for new mobility companies, stoking partnerships with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs). OEMs are already making strategic investments or acquisitions for Level 3 and Level 4 self-learning technology; there are several prominent startups in the market. "Technology companies are expected to be the new Tier I for OEMs for deep-learning technology," said Frost & Sullivan Intelligent Mobility Research Analyst Sistla Raghuvamsi. "Google and NVIDIA will be key companies within this space, dominating the market by 2025. Meanwhile, 13 OEMs will be investing over $7.0 billion in the development of various AI use cases. Hyundai, Toyota, and GM will account for 53.4 percent of the total investment share." The challenge for technology developers lies in gathering the data required to train the AI to support self-driving capabilities. This is prompting the development of artificial simulations to run trained AI, as well as the creation of low-cost level 2 systems for driver analytics and assistance that can eventually provide data for levels 3 and 4. "High processing capability with low power consumption will be critical to enable various levels of self-learning cars," noted Raghuvamsi. "By 2025, level 4 self-learning cars will integrate home, work and commercial networks, enhancing the value to end users." Executive Analysis of Self-learning Artificial Intelligence in Cars, Forecast to 2025 is part of the Automotive & Transportation Growth Partnership Service program, which also includes insights on disruptive satellite communication, commercial vehicle telematics, driver monitoring systems, automotive interiors, wearables integration and head-up displays. Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Contact us: Start the discussion. Executive Analysis of Self-learning Artificial Intelligence in Cars, Forecast to 2025 K053-18


News Article | January 6, 2016
Site: phys.org

Bejeweled smartphone cases shared space with vibrating forks, Wi-Fi-connected washing machines were displayed alongside the latest pair of celebrity-backed headphones. The weeklong convention lacked focus, and the reasons for skipping it began to mount. This year's CES is slated to be the biggest ever, taking up more than 2.4 million square feet of exhibit space, about a 7 percent increase from a year earlier, when it officially kicks off Wednesday after two days of media previews. Despite its gargantuan footprint, show organizers say the convention will be more manageable and relevant. There will be less emphasis on the typical CES electronics like televisions, tablets and smartphones, and more attention paid to industry-changing innovations such as connected, electric and driverless cars; the Internet of Things ; drones; virtual reality and gaming; and entertainment tech. To reflect that shift, the Consumer Electronics Association, which produces CES, recently changed its name to the Consumer Technology Association - a small but symbolic move. After several years of muted interest, that's spurring renewed optimism about the annual trade show, held every January in Las Vegas. CES is one of the world's biggest technology gatherings, and an estimated 150,000 to 170,000 people are expected to attend. Don't expect to see a groundbreaking new product category among the 3,600 exhibitors. But as fledgling tech sectors have matured, the incremental advancements should be more compelling. Once again, automakers will command a heavy presence at CES, which in recent years has become almost as much of a car show as a consumer electronics one. Gary Shapiro, president of the Consumer Technology Association, said auto-tech companies will occupy more than 200,000 square feet of exhibit space, up from 150,000 square feet last year. Although cars weren't historically part of the CES lineup, the auto industry's participation "is an absolute natural fit" as cars have become important platforms to house technology, said James Pillar, head of marketing for Bentley Motor Inc.'s Americas division. "The car is very much a consumer product, and the level of technology in cars now is exceptional," Pillar said. "They're not mutually exclusive, they're very much one and the same." Auto brands including BMW, Ford, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz USA, Porsche and Toyota are attending. Mary Barra, chief executive of General Motors, and Herbert Diess, head of Volkswagen Passenger Cars, are giving keynote addresses. Another big trend at CES will be the Internet of Things , as exhibitors show off a plethora of Web-connected, sensor-loaded, app-driven clothing, kitchen appliances, jewelry and thermostats. But the explosion of "smart" items has left many consumers feeling Internet of Things fatigue, so exhibitors are under pressure to prove that their gizmos are truly solving a problem and adding value. One company hoping to tap into the wearables trend is Chronos, which makes a tiny device that transforms an ordinary wristwatch into a smartwatch that can track steps and other activity. Founder and Chief Executive Mark Nichol said the San Francisco company chose CES for the device's public debut because "it's where you have to be - everyone is there." "We think we have such a unique take on what a wearable is that we'll really stand out," he said. "This is the one pure wearable tech show that we're definitely doing." As CES has broadened its scope, organizers have tried several strategies to manage the sprawl. Startups have gained greater prominence with their own dedicated exhibit area called Eureka Park that this year will be 33 percent larger than in 2015, with 500 exhibitors and a waiting list to join. And Shapiro said those startups have to offer a worthwhile, tech-driven product. "They can't just be a plastic case accessories company," he said. Of course, not everything that is heavily touted at CES goes on to become a life-changing product. Take, for instance, 3-D televisions, which were the "it" innovation of CES six years ago but quickly flamed out because of high prices, a lack of content and skeptical consumers. Shapiro didn't mince words when he spoke of the ultimate disappointment of 3-D TVs. "It was overhyped and I think there were those in the industry that were delusional, frankly, and they believed their own hyperbole," he said. "Yes, it was the talk of the show for one year because a lot of the set-makers were very excited about it, but it was definitely a mistake and it hurt industry credibility." Explore further: ' Internet of Things ' to take CES center stage


News Article | November 12, 2015
Site: www.techtimes.com

If you're tired of sitting in your car frustrated over traffic congestions or just too sleepy and plain tired at the end of the day, Kevin Ashton has a technological forecast that will surely excite you. The man who coined the term " Internet of Things" himself predicted that by the year 2030, you'll be able to put your feet up on your dashboard because cars will do the driving for you. That's right, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Auto-ID Center founder Kevin Ashton believes that the technology of the future is predictable when you base it on past trends and he wrote a book titled "How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery" which is currently a finalist for Best Innovation & Creativity Book of the Year in the 800-CEO-READ Business Book Awards for 2015. "Expect self-driving features in most new cars by 2020 and cars without steering wheels between 2025-2030, varying by country. What's the point? They will be safer, faster, more fuel efficient, and you'll be able to get things done, or take a nap, while you move from place to place," he wrote. He anchored the predictability of future technology on three specific laws that technological progress seems to abide by: Moore's Law or the idea that every two years, microprocessors half in size; Metcalfe's Law which determines that a network's value is dependent on the number of users squared; and Koomey's Law which establishes the idea that every 18 months, the energy spent for computation is halved. Basically, what this means is that computer technology becomes smaller, constantly connected to the Internet and more energy efficient. Ashton's predictions may just be on its way to the streets as more and more car manufacturers are investing in technology to produce a self-driving vehicle. Toyota, Nissan, General Motors and Google are racing to perfect their technology as they all announced their plan to get autonomous vehicles cruising the streets by 2020. We have five years of waiting time for car manufacturers to make good on their plans and 15 years to see if Ashton's predictions are correct. To pique your interest on his ideas more, Ashton also predicted that we will discover extra-terrestrial life and gives his take on the reality of Climate Change and how humans would cope with it.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.acnnewswire.com

Trillium and NXP join forces to boost auto cybersecurity as IoT takes to the highway Trillium Inc. today announced joint development efforts with NXP Semiconductors (NASDAQ: NXPI) for next-generation automotive cybersecurity applications. The announcement was made at the Munich opening of ESCAR Europe, the leading global conference series on automotive cybersecurity. The initiative involves non-invasive in-vehicle testing of Tokyo-based Trillium's SecureCAR software on the next-generation S32K microcontroller (MCU)* platform by NXP, the world's leading semiconductor supplier for the automotive industry. Focused on optimizing SecureCAR performance, the initial phase of research demonstrates the performance of Trillium's software on NXP's S32K MCUs. Follow-up efforts will expand the scope to include NXP's Smart Secure Transceivers, and implement the complete solution in a production vehicle with a major Japanese OEM. The cooperative effort aims to deliver a combined hardware and software security solution to meet the demands of the automotive security market. "NXP's engagement with Trillium extends our leadership position in automotive cybersecurity. Trillium's SecureCAR software nicely complements NXP's hardware-based solutions as part of our expanding security solution ecosystem," said Manuel Alves, VP and GM, Product Line General Purpose Automotive MCUs at NXP. "This is an important step forward in a critical mission for the auto industry," said David M. Uze, President and CEO of Trillium. "The connected car is the key to progress in safety, entertainment, and environmental performance. But until cybersecurity can be guaranteed with certainty, progress will stop in its tracks." Trillium's SecureCAR software provides patent pending Authentication, Encryption, Dynamic Key Lock Pairing (symmetric session key exchange management) and Asymmetric master key generation for securely protecting vehicle network payloads. The S32K offers a Cryptographic Services Engine (CSE) which includes a true random number generator plus secure flash for key storage among other innovative security features. The combined S32K plus SecureCAR software solution enables real-time secure applications by reducing the security burden on automotive networks. The optimized approach requires up to three times lower bandwidth than standard approaches. * NXP S32K MCU : http://bit.ly/2fXImuO About Trillium Inc. Trillium was established in 2014 to pursue development of advanced IoT and automotive cybersecurity software technology, including lightweight encryption, authentication, cryptographic key management, IDS/IPS and secure OTA software update technology. The Tokyo-based start-up plans to expand its scope to include cybersecurity for robotics, factory automation, medical, aerospace and other transport systems. To learn more, see: www.trillium.co.jp Media please contact: Ms Miki Irie,


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

International standards are needed for the Internet of Things (IoT) in order to accelerate growth in industrial and manufacturing environments, particularly among small to medium-sized businesses. "We need to get to global standards in the Industrial Internet Consortium [IIC]. Ensure the architectures are aligned and ideas and standards are being promoted at the same time," said Hans Jörg Stotz, senior vice president of IoT products and innovation at SAP. Earlier this year, SAP announced that it partnered with Bosch to create a European IoT testbed to try to develop standards to connect sensors, machines, moving assets, and facilities to permeate all layers of the industrial IoT stack. Other partners in the testbed are Dassault Systemes of France and Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) of India. TCS is doing the data acquisition, and Bosch provides energy components, and is continuously collecting data from all the machinery in the plant, generating a stream of information about the electricity consumed in the process of manufacturing. Dassault 3D Experience Platform brings a multidimensional representation of all the plant's machinery and functions, and SAP provides a platform and database for predictive analytics and big data. SEE: AT&T launches $99 IoTStarter Kit to push innovation to market faster (TechRepublic) Having international standards in place will mean that data coming from the IoT machines will be consistently identified, and mapped in the same way, whether that's data about usage, or when the machine needs maintenance. Right now, most companies are mapping data manually, and it takes so much time and costs so much in personnel labor that many small to medium-sized companies aren't able to afford it, Stotz said. "We're pushing hard for semantic standards, so that machines identify themselves. The trick is at the end of the day to identify the vast amount of things out there which could at some point talk to the system," Stotz said. Matt Jennings, regional president of the Americas for Bosch Software Innovations, said, "There are probably thousands of standards. I think as we look at IoT going forward, we want to eliminate some complexity of connectivity, and we need to discuss ways to do this." Jennings explained that developing standards is really about "developing best practices," and the more complex standards are, the more it can cost a company to follow all of them, particularly in a manufacturing environment. "Having common reference architecture for various types of industry use cases or solutions would speed up the opportunities for the organization to implement these types of solutions and it will make them less expensive to maintain," Jennings said. "I also think it will probably speed innovation because there will be a common way to look at things." Nils Herzberg, senior vice president and global co-lead for the Internet of Things at SAP, said, "Most sensors are stupid. They do not describe themselves to the Internet of Things . Most cars do not say, 'I'm a Chrysler 200 and my serial number is...'. It would be helpful if the machines could volunteer this information, and the Internet of Things would describe itself to itself." A standardized language would help make sense of industrial data. Sanjay Khatri, director of product marketing and IoT services for Jasper, which was acquired by Cisco earlier this year, said, "Those sensors and those devices that are being embedded into the industrial assets and all of the equipment that's being used in an industrial context, you want to make sure that those are standardized. If you're a car manufacturer like GM, you have manufacturing equipment on the factory floor, but you also have forklifts and you have various different types of other equipment within your manufacturing operation that you're using to run your entire operation. You want to make sure that there is some level of standardization so that when you collect all that data into a central repository you can get a consistent view." While there are some standards in place, such as the OPC UA, an industrial M2M communication protocol, they aren't sufficient for international IoT use. Stotz said, "What we are developing here isn't new and unrelated to all standards. OPC UA is a standard that could easily implement the ideas that are currently being discussed in the German platform industry. We believe that existing standards could extend and adopt the ideas being brought forward." "From a Cisco perspective, we totally agree," said Paul Didier, solutions architect manager for Cisco's IoT solutions group. "We're working really hard to make sure that those standards exist." Didier said, "It's really clear there's a lot of value in IoT. A lot of people will say, 'f I had the data, I could do this, I could do that, I could do a lot of amazing things.' That first part of the sentence, 'if I had the data,' is one of the biggest hurdles. Many of these industrial environments are using segmented, proprietary networks that don't communicate with other networks. Anything in there is a challenge to deliver with industrial IoT networks if they remain unmerged." "Even in sub-verticals like manufacturing for industrial IoT there's a lot of work that needs to be done about trying to simplify and make sense of all these different protocols," he said. Stotz said, "At the end of the day, I think IoT will only become real if we have standards. Otherwise the small suppliers will not be able to enter the game."

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