General Hospital of Peoples Armed Police Forces

Beijing, China

General Hospital of Peoples Armed Police Forces

Beijing, China

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Ke Y.,Institute of Disease Control and Prevention | Li W.,Jilin University | Wang Y.,General Hospital of Peoples Armed Police Forces | Yang M.,Institute of Disease Control and Prevention | And 8 more authors.
International Journal of Medical Microbiology | Year: 2016

Brucella spp. avoid host immune recognition and thus, weaken the immune response to infection. The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella spp. is thought to be involved in blocking host innate immune responses by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. In this study, based on the observation that TcpB binds to the host target proteins, MAL, through the TIR domain, we examined decoy peptides from TcpB TIR domains and found that TB-8 and TB-9 substantially inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced signaling in vitro and in vivo. Both these peptides share a common loop, the DD loop, indicating a novel structural region mediating TIR interactions. The inhibition of LPS signaling by TB-8 and TB-9 shows no preference to MyD88-dependent cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β or TRIF-dependent cytokines including IFN-β and IL-6. Furthermore, these two peptides rescue the virulence of Brucella δ. tcpB mutants at the cellular level, indicating key roles of the DD loop in Brucella pathogenesis. In conclusion, identification of inhibitors from the bacterial TIR domains is helpful not only for illustrating interacting mechanisms between TIR domains and bacterial pathogenesis, but also for developing novel signaling inhibitors and therapeutics for human inflammatory diseases. © 2016 Elsevier GmbH.


Li W.,Jilin University | Li W.,Test Methoddology Teaching and Research Secretion | Ke Y.,Institute of Disease Control and Prevention | Wang Y.,General Hospital of Peoples Armed Police Forces | And 10 more authors.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2016

Brucella spp. are known to avoid host immune recognition and weaken the immune response to infection. Brucella like accomplish this by employing two clever strategies, called the stealth strategy and hijacking strategy. The TIR domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella melitensis is thought to be involved in inhibiting host NF-κB activation by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. However, of the five TIR domain-containing adaptors conserved in mammals, whether MyD88 or MAL, even other three adaptors, are specifically targeted by TcpB has not been identified. Here, we confirmed the effect of TcpB on B.melitensis virulence in mice and found that TcpB selectively targets MAL. By using siRNA against MAL, we found that TcpB from B.melitensis is involved in intracellular survival and that MAL affects intracellular replication of B.melitensis. Our results confirm that TcpB specifically targets MAL/TIRAP to disrupt downstream signaling pathways and promote intra-host survival of Brucella spp. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Construction Engineering Research Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital of General Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army, Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Shihezi University and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of medical microbiology : IJMM | Year: 2016

Brucella spp. avoid host immune recognition and thus, weaken the immune response to infection. The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella spp. is thought to be involved in blocking host innate immune responses by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. In this study, based on the observation that TcpB binds to the host target proteins, MAL, through the TIR domain, we examined decoy peptides from TcpB TIR domains and found that TB-8 and TB-9 substantially inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced signaling in vitro and in vivo. Both these peptides share a common loop, the DD loop, indicating a novel structural region mediating TIR interactions. The inhibition of LPS signaling by TB-8 and TB-9 shows no preference to MyD88-dependent cytokines, such as TNF- and IL-1 or TRIF-dependent cytokines including IFN- and IL-6. Furthermore, these two peptides rescue the virulence of Brucella tcpB mutants at the cellular level, indicating key roles of the DD loop in Brucella pathogenesis. In conclusion, identification of inhibitors from the bacterial TIR domains is helpful not only for illustrating interacting mechanisms between TIR domains and bacterial pathogenesis, but also for developing novel signaling inhibitors and therapeutics for human inflammatory diseases.


PubMed | Jilin University, Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, The First Affiliated Hospital of General Hospital of Peoples Liberation Army, General Hospital of Peoples Armed Police Forces and Shihezi University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biochemical and biophysical research communications | Year: 2016

Brucella spp. are known to avoid host immune recognition and weaken the immune response to infection. Brucella like accomplish this by employing two clever strategies, called the stealth strategy and hijacking strategy. The TIR domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella melitensis is thought to be involved in inhibiting host NF-B activation by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. However, of the five TIR domain-containing adaptors conserved in mammals, whether MyD88 or MAL, even other three adaptors, are specifically targeted by TcpB has not been identified. Here, we confirmed the effect of TcpB on B.melitensis virulence in mice and found that TcpB selectively targets MAL. By using siRNA against MAL, we found that TcpB from B.melitensis is involved in intracellular survival and that MAL affects intracellular replication of B.melitensis. Our results confirm that TcpB specifically targets MAL/TIRAP to disrupt downstream signaling pathways and promote intra-host survival of Brucella spp.


Guan K.,Beijing Institute of Biotechnology | Zheng Z.,Beijing Institute of Biotechnology | Song T.,Beijing Institute of Biotechnology | He X.,Beijing Institute of Disease Control and Prevention | And 11 more authors.
Molecular and Cellular Biology | Year: 2013

The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein MAVS (IPS-1, VISA, or Cardif) plays an important role in the host defense against viral infection by inducing type I interferon. Recent reports have shown that MAVS is also critical for virus-induced apoptosis. However, the mechanism of MAVS-mediated apoptosis induction remains unclear. Here, we show that MAVS binds to voltagedependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and induces apoptosis by caspase-3 activation, which is independent of its role in innate immunity. MAVS modulates VDAC1 protein stability by decreasing its degradative K48-linked ubiquitination. In addition, MAVS knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) display reduced VDAC1 expression with a consequent reduction of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-induced apoptosis response. Notably, the upregulation of VDAC1 triggered by VSV infection is completely abolished in MAVS knockout MEFs. We thus identify VDAC1 as a target of MAVS and describe a novel mechanism of MAVS control of virus-induced apoptotic cell death ©2013, American Society for Microbiology.


Xia X.-Y.,Capital Medical University | Xia Y.-X.,General Hospital of Peoples Armed Police Forces
Chinese Medical Sciences Journal | Year: 2011

Objective: To investigate the effect of graded hypothermia on neuropathologic alterations of neonatal rat brain after exposed to hypoxic-ischemic insult at 37°C, 33°C, 31°C, and 28°C, respectively, and to observe the effect of hypothermia on 72-kDa heat shock protein (HSP72) expression after hypoxic-ischemic insult. Methods: Seven days old Wistar rats were subjected to unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to hypoxia in 8% oxygen for 2 hours at 37°C, 33°C, 31°C, and 28°C, respectively. The brain temperature was monitored indirectly by inserting a mini-thermocouple probe into the temporal muscle during hypoxia. After hypoxia-ischemia their mortality was assessed. Neuronal damage was assessed with HE staining 72 hours after hypoxia. HSP72 expression at 0.5, 24, and 72 hours of recovery was immunohistochemically assessed using a monoclonal antibody to HSP72. Results: Hypoxia-ischemia caused 10.5% (2/19) of mortality in rat of 37°C group, but no death occurred in 33°C, 31°C or 28°C groups. HE staining showed neuropathologic damage was extensive in rats exposed to hypoxia-ischemia at 37°C (more than 80.0%). The incidence of severe brain damage was significantly decreased in 33°C (53.3%) and 31°C groups (44.4%), and no histologic injury was seen in the 28°C group of rats. Expression of HSP72 was manifest and persistent in the rat brain of 37°C group, but minimum in the rat brain of 28°C group. Conclusion: Mild and moderate hypothermia might prevent cerebral visible neuropathologic damage associated with hypoxic-ischemic injury by decreasing stress response.

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