General Building Research Corporation of Japan

of Japan, Japan

General Building Research Corporation of Japan

of Japan, Japan
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Masuo K.,Supporting Association for Building Structural Technology | Doushita W.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Adachi M.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan
AIJ Journal of Technology and Design | Year: 2014

Wide width beams are frequently designed in R/C moment resisting frame. Using mechanical anchorage for such beam reinforcements, development strength of a part which is not able to anchor in column section may be deteriorated. In order to solve this problem, the authors proposed new reinforcement detailing. In this study, R/C L-shaped joint connected with wide width beam using mechanical anchorage is tested. Consequently, the authors clarify ultimate strength and beam end ductility of these L-shaped joints.


Masuo K.,Supporting Association for Building Structural Technology | Doushita W.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Adachi M.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan
AIJ Journal of Technology and Design | Year: 2014

Effective utilization of 590N/mm2 class high-strength reinforcement is able to reduce number of footing beam reinforcements. However its validity is not verified by experiment. In this study, R/C L-shaped joint using 590 N/mm2 class high-strength reinforcement and mechanical anchorage is tested. Consequently, the authors clarified that the proposed design formula can be applied for estimation ultimate strength of such joint as well as using normal-strength reinforcement.


Tsuchihashi T.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Harada K.,Kyoto University
Journal of Environmental Engineering (Japan) | Year: 2015

To investigate the specimen's surface heat balance of the ISO 5660 cone calorimeter (CCM) and ISO 5657 ignitability test apparatus, galvanized thin steel plate (0.27mm) was heated. CCM tests were carried out in horizontal and vertical orientations. The steady state surface temperatures were measured for heating intensities up to 60kW/m2. The corresponding surface temperatures were up to 720°C. The specimen's surface heat balance was estimated by measured surface temperatures. In all the results, re-radiation by surface dominated the heat loss. Convection and conduction heat loss are relatively small. In comparison of horizontal and vertical CCM results, there was no obvious difference if the heating intensity is below 40kW/m2. Above 40kW/m2, when the surface temperature is higher than 600°C, the convection heat loss was larger in vertical orientation. In case of ignitability test apparatus, convection heat loss is smaller than horizontal CCM, but the conduction heat loss was about six times larger. The estimated convective heat transfer coefficient was around 0.013-0.015 kW/(m2·K) in CCM for the surface temperature range of 200 to 400°C. Above 600°C, the coefficient tends to increase in vertical CCM. On the other hand, the convective heat transfer coefficient in ignitability test apparatus is about 0.006 kW/(m2·K), which is about half to one third of the values in CCM.


Shimizu T.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Toyoda M.,Kansai University | Takahashi D.,Kyoto University | Kawai Y.,Kansai University
Applied Acoustics | Year: 2013

The phenomenon of mass-air-mass resonance between multiple panes of a window degrades the noise insulation performance. In this study, a prediction method for the effect of this resonance is proposed by using the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and its countermeasure by a sound-absorbing treatment for the perimeter of the air cavity on the insulation performance are also discussed. Additionally, the purpose of this paper is to explain the detail of the analysis for prediction of sound transmission of double-pane windows, and to expand this method to triple-pane windows. For simplicity in the analysis and to make clear both the phenomenon of mass-air-mass resonance and the effect of its countermeasure, each pane is modeled as a limp panel that depends only on the mass law, therefore neither the modal effect nor coincidence effect due to elasticity of each pane is considered. In this study, the effect of pane size on sound transmission is evaluated by using the same limp-panel model of infinite extent, which has the essence of mass-air-mass resonance and may express the effect of the phenomenon noticeably.Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Shimozawa K.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Nagayama M.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Imamoto K.,Tokyo University of Science | Yamasaki J.,Asanuma Corporation
Life-Cycle of Structural Systems: Design, Assessment, Maintenance and Management - Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE 2014 | Year: 2015

Durability of reinforced concrete structure depends on the quality of the concrete cover that inhibits the rebar corrosion in concrete. Hence, for evaluating the performance of concrete cover to resist the rebar corrosion in concrete, authors proposed “Drill-PR method” using the permeability velocity and resistivity measured by the hole drilled in the surface of concrete. In this paper, several kinds of concrete were prepared for an experimental study on the application of Figg’s intrusive method and resistivity test method (Wenner method) to the Drill-PR method. The Student’s t-statistical analysis of the test results indicates a good capability of the air-permeability by Figg’s intrusive method for evaluating the performance of concrete cover to resist the rebar corrosion. It was also known that the resistivity test method was significantly affected by the water cement ratio, moisture content of concrete and relative humidity. Based on the results of these experiments, authors proposed a classification for the performance of concrete cover to resist the rebar corrosion in concrete. © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


Ryu J.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Sato H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Kurakata K.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Hiramitsu A.,Japan Building Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Acoustical Science and Technology | Year: 2010

The subjective ratings of heavy-weight floor impact sounds in wood frame construction were examined. Heavy-weight floor impact sounds were recorded in a mock-up building, which had four floors and two rooms each floor. The different insulation treatments were installed in the floors of each room and walls separating rooms. The stimuli consisted of 48 sounds (4 types × 2 receiver positions × 6 rooms) recorded in the mock-up building, which had 49-78 dB in the single number rating index (Li i,Fmax,r). Low pass filter with cutoff frequency 1.5 kHz was applied to remove electrical noise components in higher frequency range. The pink noise was produced from 8 loud speakers at every each 45 degree at the 1.75 m from subject and at the height of subject's ear positions. The results showed that sound insulations in higher frequency octave bands are more effective to decrease annoyance than those in lower frequency octave bands for the heavy-weight impact sound.


Hirose T.,Kansai University | Ito A.,Kansai University | Shimohira Y.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan
Journal of Structural and Construction Engineering | Year: 2015

For estimating the bearing capacity of press-in concrete pile which are used for the small building foundations, we collected the loading test data and statistically examined the relations between the ultimate bearing capacity and the conversion N-value by the SWS tests. Correlation was comparatively high in the ultimate point bearing capacity with the average conversion N-value within above and below 1D (D : equivalent diameter) of pile tip in case of sandy soil, within above 1D and below 2D of pile tip in case of cohesive soil. In addition, the press-in force to complete penetration of pile was almost equal to the allowable bearing capacity for the short time loading obtained by the vertical loading test.


Ryu J.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Sato H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Kurakata K.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Hiramitsu A.,Japan Building Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America | Year: 2011

This study investigated the relation between annoyance and single-number quantities to rate heavy-weight floor impact sound insulation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the subjective response of annoyance resulting from heavy-weight floor impact sounds recorded in wooden houses. Stimuli had two typical spectra and their modified versions, which simulate the precise change in frequency response resulting from insulation treatments. Results of the first experiment showed that the Zwicker's percentile loudness (N5) was the quantity to rate most well annoyance of heavy-weight impact sound over a wide sound level range. The second experiment revealed that arithmetic average (LiFavg,Fmax) of octave-band sound pressure levels measured using the time constant fast and Zwicker's percentile loudness (N 5) much better described annoyance by the precise change in the sound spectrum attributable to insulation treatments than Japanese standardized single-number quantities (Li,Fmax,r, LiA,Fmax, and L i,Fmax,Aw) do. Japanese standardized single-number quantities using the A-weighting curve as a rating curve were found to be excessively influenced by the 63 Hz octave-band sound level and have the great sound level-dependences in the relation with subjective ratings. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America.


Nishino T.,Kobe University | Suzuki H.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Tsuchihashi T.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan
Fire Safety Science | Year: 2014

This paper describes an effort to model the heat release rate curve of a tsunami fire. A tsunami fire is defined as a fire that breaks out in coastal areas inundated by a tsunami following an earthquake. Tsunami fires may result in the ignition of tsunami refuge buildings. One type of tsunami fire is a fire where fuel oil spilled from tanks and an enormous amount of debris such as timber, broken houses and expanded polystyrene are burning together on the sea surface. We conducted basic combustion experiments for this type of fire using a pool with a size of 600 mm square where heat release rates were measured by varying the types of debris and the exposed surface areas of fuel oil. Furthermore, a model for heat release rate at the fully developed phase and time to the beginning of fire decay was proposed. The predictions of the proposed model are shown to be more conservative in comparison with the experimental data. © Copyright 2014 International association for fire safety science.


Yoshida N.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Matsunami Y.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Nagayama M.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Sakai E.,Tokyo Institute of Technology
Journal of Advanced Concrete Technology | Year: 2010

When a residential concrete foundation is constructed on sulfate-bearing ground, scaling of the concrete surface often arises from the crystallization and hydration pressure of the sodium sulfate that crystallizes in the pores of the concrete. Similar deterioration has been confirmed in stones and rocks and so on. This deterioration phenomenon is called "salt weathering." We have confirmed several deterioration cases of residential concrete foundation and it is clear that such cases are widely distributed across Japan. This paper describes the results of field investigations and laboratory experiments on salt weathering of concrete. The laboratory experiment using mortar specimen shows the deterioration of mortar similar to residential concrete foundations was reproduced. We focused on the influences of the dry-wet cycle and the carbonation of the cement matrix, presuming that these are one of influential factors for salt weathering. With regard to the influence of the mix proportion of mortar, we established that low water-cement ratio has good resistance against salt weathering. However, additions to the mix proportion were not found to be effective, and the decrease in pH and the decomposition of C-S-H by carbonation are thought to affect the salt weathering resistance. Copyright © 2010 Japan Concrete Institute.

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