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Sato H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Hiramitsu A.,Japan National Institute for Land and Infrastructure Management | Tanaka M.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan
INTERNOISE 2014 - 43rd International Congress on Noise Control Engineering: Improving the World Through Noise Control | Year: 2014

This paper presents the subjective difference of floor impact sound of wood-frame floors with different floor-ceiling systems. All impact sounds of wood-frame floors were measured in reverberation chamber with standardized rubber ball. The impact sound of concrete floor was also measured. Sheffe's paired comparison method was used to obtain psychological scale values of each impact sound. The listening test confirmed that all wood-frame test floors are quieter than the RC floor, performance of larch plywood floor without resilient channel was lower than standard plywood floor but the performance of larch floor can be improved greatly with resilient channel. Furthermore, there are some cases those psychological scale value can differentiate conditions but the A-weighted maximum level cannot present differences between them. Source


Ryu J.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Sato H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Kurakata K.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Hiramitsu A.,Japan Building Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Acoustical Science and Technology | Year: 2010

The subjective ratings of heavy-weight floor impact sounds in wood frame construction were examined. Heavy-weight floor impact sounds were recorded in a mock-up building, which had four floors and two rooms each floor. The different insulation treatments were installed in the floors of each room and walls separating rooms. The stimuli consisted of 48 sounds (4 types × 2 receiver positions × 6 rooms) recorded in the mock-up building, which had 49-78 dB in the single number rating index (Li i,Fmax,r). Low pass filter with cutoff frequency 1.5 kHz was applied to remove electrical noise components in higher frequency range. The pink noise was produced from 8 loud speakers at every each 45 degree at the 1.75 m from subject and at the height of subject's ear positions. The results showed that sound insulations in higher frequency octave bands are more effective to decrease annoyance than those in lower frequency octave bands for the heavy-weight impact sound. Source


Shimizu T.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan | Toyoda M.,Kansai University | Takahashi D.,Kyoto University | Kawai Y.,Kansai University
Applied Acoustics | Year: 2013

The phenomenon of mass-air-mass resonance between multiple panes of a window degrades the noise insulation performance. In this study, a prediction method for the effect of this resonance is proposed by using the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and its countermeasure by a sound-absorbing treatment for the perimeter of the air cavity on the insulation performance are also discussed. Additionally, the purpose of this paper is to explain the detail of the analysis for prediction of sound transmission of double-pane windows, and to expand this method to triple-pane windows. For simplicity in the analysis and to make clear both the phenomenon of mass-air-mass resonance and the effect of its countermeasure, each pane is modeled as a limp panel that depends only on the mass law, therefore neither the modal effect nor coincidence effect due to elasticity of each pane is considered. In this study, the effect of pane size on sound transmission is evaluated by using the same limp-panel model of infinite extent, which has the essence of mass-air-mass resonance and may express the effect of the phenomenon noticeably.Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Hirose T.,Kansai University | Ito A.,Kansai University | Shimohira Y.,General Building Research Corporation of Japan
Journal of Structural and Construction Engineering | Year: 2015

For estimating the bearing capacity of press-in concrete pile which are used for the small building foundations, we collected the loading test data and statistically examined the relations between the ultimate bearing capacity and the conversion N-value by the SWS tests. Correlation was comparatively high in the ultimate point bearing capacity with the average conversion N-value within above and below 1D (D : equivalent diameter) of pile tip in case of sandy soil, within above 1D and below 2D of pile tip in case of cohesive soil. In addition, the press-in force to complete penetration of pile was almost equal to the allowable bearing capacity for the short time loading obtained by the vertical loading test. Source


Ryu J.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Sato H.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Kurakata K.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Hiramitsu A.,Japan Building Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America | Year: 2011

This study investigated the relation between annoyance and single-number quantities to rate heavy-weight floor impact sound insulation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the subjective response of annoyance resulting from heavy-weight floor impact sounds recorded in wooden houses. Stimuli had two typical spectra and their modified versions, which simulate the precise change in frequency response resulting from insulation treatments. Results of the first experiment showed that the Zwicker's percentile loudness (N5) was the quantity to rate most well annoyance of heavy-weight impact sound over a wide sound level range. The second experiment revealed that arithmetic average (LiFavg,Fmax) of octave-band sound pressure levels measured using the time constant fast and Zwicker's percentile loudness (N 5) much better described annoyance by the precise change in the sound spectrum attributable to insulation treatments than Japanese standardized single-number quantities (Li,Fmax,r, LiA,Fmax, and L i,Fmax,Aw) do. Japanese standardized single-number quantities using the A-weighting curve as a rating curve were found to be excessively influenced by the 63 Hz octave-band sound level and have the great sound level-dependences in the relation with subjective ratings. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America. Source

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