Genclis SAS

Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France

Genclis SAS

Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France
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Favrot C.,University of Zürich | Linek M.,Tieraerztliche Spezialisten | Fontaine J.,Clinique Veterinaire | Beco L.,Cabinet Veterinaire | And 5 more authors.
Veterinary Dermatology | Year: 2017

Background: Food allergy is often suspected in dogs with clinical signs of atopic dermatitis. This diagnosis is confirmed with an elimination diet and a subsequent challenge with regular food. Laboratory tests for the diagnosis of food allergy in dogs are unreliable and/or technically difficult. Cyno-DIAL® is a Western blot method that might assist with the selection of an appropriate elimination diet. Hypothesis/Objectives: To evaluate the performance of Cyno-DIAL® for the selection of an elimination diet and diagnosis of food allergy. Animals/Methods: Thirty eight dogs with atopic dermatitis completed an elimination diet. Combining the results of the diet trials and the challenges, 14 dogs were classified as food allergic (FA), 22 as nonfood-allergic and two as ambiguous cases. Results: Amongst all dogs and amongst dogs with a clinical diagnosis of FA, 3% and 7% (respectively) were positive to Royal Canin Anallergenic®, Vet-Concept Kanguru® or Vet-Concept Dog Sana®; 8% and 7% to Hill's d/d Duck and Rice®; 8% and 21% to Hill's z/d Ultra Allergen Free®; 53% and 64% to Eukanuba Dermatosis FP®; and 32% and 43% to a home-cooked diet of horse meat, potatoes and zucchini. The specificity and sensitivity of Cyno-DIAL® for diagnosing food allergy were 73% and 71%, respectively. Conclusions and clinical importance: Although Cyno-DIAL® was considered potentially useful for identifying appropriate foods for elimination diet trials, it cannot be recommended for the diagnosis of food allergy. The Cyno-DIAL® test performed better than some previously evaluated ELISA-based tests. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD


Morisset M.,University of Lorraine | Richard C.,Genclis SAS | Astier C.,University of Lorraine | Jacquenet S.,Genclis SAS | And 8 more authors.
Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology | Year: 2012

Background: Carbohydrate-specific IgE antibodies present on nonprimate mammalian proteins were incriminated recently in delayed meat anaphylaxis. The aim of this study was to explore whether anaphylaxis to mammalian kidney is also associated with galactose-α-1,3-galactose (αGal)-specific IgE. Methods: Fourteen patients with anaphylaxis to pork or beef kidney underwent prick tests to meat and kidney. Some patients also underwent skin tests to Erbitux® (cetuximab). IgE antibodies to αGal, swine urine proteins, beef and pork meat, serum albumin proteins, cat, and rFel d 1 were measured by ImmunoCAP®. The αGal levels were estimated in meats and kidney by ELISA inhibition assay. Cross-reactivity between αGal and pork kidney was studied with the ImmunoCAP® inhibition assay. Results: Among the 14 patients, 12 presented with anaphylactic shock. Reactions occurred within 2 h from exposure in 67% of patients. Associated risk factors were observed in 10 cases, and alcohol was the main cofactor. Three patients underwent an oral challenge to pork kidney, and anaphylaxis occurred after ingestion of small quantities (1-2 g). Prick tests to kidney were positive in 54% of patients. All tested patients showed positive skin tests to Erbitux®. All patients tested positive for IgE to αGal, with levels ranging from 0.4 to 294 kU/l. IgE binding to αGal was inhibited by raw pork kidney extract (mean, 77%; range, 55-87%), which showed a high amount of αGal determinants. Conclusions: Pork or beef kidney anaphylaxis is related to αGal IgE. Its peculiar severity could be due to an elevated content of αGal epitopes in kidney. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Richard C.,Genclis SAS | Jacquenet S.,Genclis SAS | Sergeant P.,University of Lorraine | Moneret-Vautrin D.A.,University of Lorraine
European annals of allergy and clinical immunology | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND: Legume allergy is the fifth food allergy in Europe. The dun pea (Pisum sativum sativum var. arvense), a pea belonging to the same subspecies as green pea, has been recently introduced as an ingredient in the human food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the cross-reactivity between dun pea and other legumes and to search for modification of allergenicity induced by food technologies.METHODS: A series of 36 patients with legume and/or peanut allergy was studied. They underwent skin tests to peanut and a panel of legumes including dun pea. Specific IgE to dun pea and cross-reactivity to peanut allergens, particularly to Ara h 1, were evaluated by ELISA. Proteins and allergens of different pea extracts were studied by SDS-PAGE and immunoblots.RESULTS: In France and Belgium, 7.7% of severe food anaphylaxis cases were due to legumes. Patients with isolated legume allergy had positive prick tests to dun pea, whereas patients with isolated peanut allergy had negative prick tests. Cross-reactivity between sIgE to peanut and dun pea was observed, and more frequently than expected (96%) peanut-allergic patients with legume sensitization or allergy had sIgE to Ara h 1. Analysis of dun pea allergens suggested that protein epitopes were presented differently in dun pea seeds, isolate and flour.CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies, for the first time, a risk of dun pea allergy in legume-allergic patients and in a subset of peanut-allergic patients.


Clincke M.-F.,University of Lorraine | Clincke M.-F.,Genclis SAS | Guedon E.,University of Lorraine | Yen F.T.,University of Lorraine | And 3 more authors.
Biotechnology Progress | Year: 2011

The control of glycosylation to satisfy regulatory requirements and quality consistency of recombinant proteins produced by different processes has become an important issue. With two N-glycosylation sites, γ-interferon (IFN-γ) can be seen as a prototype of a recombinant therapeutic glycoprotein for this purpose. The effect of the nonionic surfactant Pluronic F-68 (PF-68) on cell growth and death was investigated, as well as production and glycosylation of recombinant IFN-γ produced by a CHO cell line that was maintained in a rich protein-free medium in the absence or presence of low agitation. Under these conditions, a dose-dependent effect of PF-68 (0-0.1%) was shown not only to significantly enhance growth but also to reduce cell lysis. Interestingly, supplementing the culture medium with PF-68 led to increased IFN-γ production as a result of both higher cell densities and a higher specific production rate of IFN-γ. If cells were grown with agitation, lack of PF-68 in the culture medium decreased the fraction of the fully glycosylated IFN-γ glycoform (2N) from 80% to 65-70% during the initial period. This effect appeared to be due to a lag phase in cell growth observed during this period. Finally, a global kinetic study of CHO cell metabolism indicated higher efficiency in the utilization of the two major carbon substrates when cultures were supplemented with PF-68. Therefore, these results highlight the importance of understanding how media surfactant can affect cell growth as well as cell death and the product quality of a recombinant glycoprotein expressed in CHO cell cultures. © 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.


Codreanu F.,University of Lorraine | Codreanu F.,Genclis S.A.S. | Collignon O.,Genclis S.A.S. | Collignon O.,University of Lorraine | And 19 more authors.
International Archives of Allergy and Immunology | Year: 2011

Background: Double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) is currently considered the gold standard for peanut allergy diagnosis. However, this procedure that requires the hospitalization of patients, mostly children, in specialized centers for oral exposure to allergens may cause severe reactions requiring emergency measures. Thus, a simpler and safer diagnosis procedure is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a new set of in vitro blood tests for peanut allergy. Methods: The levels of IgE directed towards peanut extract and recombinant peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, Ara h 6, Ara h 7, and Ara h 8 were measured in 3 groups of patients enrolled at 2 independent centers: patients with proven peanut allergy (n = 166); pollen-sensitized subjects without peanut allergy (n = 61), and control subjects without allergic disease (n = 10). Results: Seventy-nine percent of the pollen-sensitized patients showed IgE binding to peanut, despite their tolerance to peanut. In contrast, combining the results of specific IgE to peanut extract and to recombinant Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 yielded a peanut allergy diagnosis with a 98% sensitivity and an 85% specificity at a positivity threshold of 0.10 kU/l. Use of a threshold of 0.23 kU/l for recombinant Ara h 2 increased specificity (96%) at the cost of sensitivity (93%). Conclusion: A simple blood test can be used to diagnose peanut allergy with a high level of precision. However, DBPCFC will remain useful for the few cases where immunological and clinical observations yield conflicting results. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG.


Lefevre S.,University of Lorraine | Jacquenet S.,GENCLIS SA | Kanny G.,University of Lorraine | Kanny G.,Nancy University Hospital Center
Revue Francaise d'Allergologie | Year: 2016

Allergy due to peanuts is a frequent food allergy, involving about 1% of the population. It is a potentially severe allergy, usually persistent and having a strong impact on the quality of life of the patients and their entourage. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, the results of skin tests plus serum assays for peanut-specific IgEs and its allergens. Confirmation of the diagnosis is established by a double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation test. Based on a review of the literature, we evaluated the place of different tests used in the diagnostic workup and we propose a decisional algorithm for food allergy due to peanuts. The suspicion of this allergy is established on the basis of a compatible clinical history and a positive skin prick-test to peanut (either a real peanut or a peanut extract). The diagnostic algorithm depends on the initial level of IgE specific for rAra h2 and rAra h6, which if positive, establishes the diagnosis of food allergy due to peanuts with a sensibility of 98% and a specificity of 96%. If the results are negative, then IgE assays for rAra h1and rAra h3 and subsequently for rAra h9 are justified. The presence of anti-rAra h8 IgE is a sign of the existence of cross-reactivity with pollens. A repeat oral introduction test may be done, following the PRACTALL consensus recommendations. This allows us to determine the level of reactivity, to implement an avoidance regime, to follow the evolution of the food allergy and to define the details of a dietary regimen. © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS.


Dano D.,University of Lorraine | Dano D.,Genclis SAS | Remington B.C.,Applied Scientific Research | Astier C.,University of Lorraine | And 5 more authors.
Food and Chemical Toxicology | Year: 2015

Background: Sesame is a relevant food allergen in France. Compared to other allergens there is a lack of food challenge data and more data could help sesame allergy risk management. The aim of this study is to collect more sesame challenge data and investigate the most efficient food challenge method for future studies. Method: Records of patients at University Hospital in Nancy (France) with objective symptoms to sesame challenges were collected and combined with previously published data. An estimation of the sesame allergy population threshold was calculated based on individual NOAELs and LOAELs. Clinical dosing schemes at Nancy were investigated to see if the optimal protocol for sesame is currently used. Results: Fourteen patients (10 M/4 F, 22 ± 14.85 years old) with objective symptoms were added to previously published data making a total of 35 sesame allergic patients. The most sensitive patient reacted to the first dose at challenge of 1.02 mg sesame protein. The ED05 ranges between 1.2 and 4.0 mg of sesame protein (Log-Normal, Log-Logistic, and Weibull models) and the ED10 between 4.2 and 6.2 mg. The optimal food challenge dosing scheme for sesame follows semi-log dose increases from 0.3 to 3000 mg protein. Conclusion: This article provides a valuable update to the existing clinical literature regarding sesame NOAELs and LOAELs. Establishment of a population threshold for sesame could help in increasing the credibility of precautionary labelling and decrease the costs associated with unexpected allergic reactions. Also, the use of an optimal dosing scheme would decrease time spent on diagnostic and thereafter on the economic burden of sesame allergy diagnosis. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | University of Lorraine, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Applied Scientific Research and Genclis SAS
Type: | Journal: Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association | Year: 2015

Sesame is a relevant food allergen in France. Compared to other allergens there is a lack of food challenge data and more data could help sesame allergy risk management. The aim of this study is to collect more sesame challenge data and investigate the most efficient food challenge method for future studies.Records of patients at University Hospital in Nancy (France) with objective symptoms to sesame challenges were collected and combined with previously published data. An estimation of the sesame allergy population threshold was calculated based on individual NOAELs and LOAELs. Clinical dosing schemes at Nancy were investigated to see if the optimal protocol for sesame is currently used.Fourteen patients (10 M/4 F, 22 14.85 years old) with objective symptoms were added to previously published data making a total of 35 sesame allergic patients. The most sensitive patient reacted to the first dose at challenge of 1.02 mg sesame protein. The ED05 ranges between 1.2 and 4.0 mg of sesame protein (Log-Normal, Log-Logistic, and Weibull models) and the ED10 between 4.2 and 6.2 mg. The optimal food challenge dosing scheme for sesame follows semi-log dose increases from 0.3 to 3000 mg protein.This article provides a valuable update to the existing clinical literature regarding sesame NOAELs and LOAELs. Establishment of a population threshold for sesame could help in increasing the credibility of precautionary labelling and decrease the costs associated with unexpected allergic reactions. Also, the use of an optimal dosing scheme would decrease time spent on diagnostic and thereafter on the economic burden of sesame allergy diagnosis.


PubMed | University of Lorraine, Emile Durkheim Hospital and Genclis SA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: European annals of allergy and clinical immunology | Year: 2016

The growing worldwide prevalence of food allergies is drawing attention to the risk of allergenic proteins found in intravenous medicinal products, particularly anaesthetics. Propofol induced anaphylaxis has been described. The presence of soybean oil and egg lecithins in the lipid emulsion highlights their suspected responsibility in certain cases. We report a case of anaphylaxis to propofol in an adult patient without food allergy to soy, but with a latent sensitization to soy. An IgE-dependent allergy to propofol was established by a basophil activation test. Here, we document for the first time the existence of specific IgEs to a 65kDa protein, found in soybean oil and soy flour. In the absence of data on the reactogenic threshold for allergenic food proteins injected intravenously, a risk appears to be established and leads us to recommend a systematic detection for proteins in the refined soybean oil used in the pharmaceutical industry for intravenous products.


PubMed | Nancy University Hospital Center, University of Lorraine, French Institute of Health and Medical Research and GENCLIS SA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Allergy | Year: 2016

Argan is used worldwide in numerous cosmetic products, as this fruit is supposed to have many beneficial properties on health. New cases of allergy can be expected with the growing use of argan. We investigated all workers (9) employed by a cosmetic factory and exposed to argan powder to identify possible allergies related to exposure to argan powder.Patients were investigated in the occupational disease department and, according to their symptoms, underwent pulmonary function testing, methacholine challenge, specific inhalation challenge to argan powder, skin prick tests, and immunoblotting analysis.We report three cases of occupational asthma to argan powder and a probable case of rhinitis. Fifteen argan proteins were recognized by the patients IgE. Identification of proteins, cross-reactions to nuts, and ELISA inhibition tests suggested that some argan allergens can cross-react in vitro with hazelnut allergens, including 11S globulin and vicilin.High-level exposure to argan powder should be considered to be a potential cause of IgE-mediated allergy, and workers handling argan powder should be carefully investigated.

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