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The mismatched pair of diamonds -- one pink and one blue -- were auctioned in separate lots, but were both sold to the same anonymous buyer. The pear-shaped diamonds were named for the Greek deities and twin brother and sister Apollo and Artemis. The 14.54-carat "Apollo Blue" sold for $42.1 million and the 16-carat "Artemis Pink" for $15.3 million. As a pair, they set a record for the most expensive earrings ever sold at auction. The prior record-holder was the Miroir de l'Amour earrings, which sold for $17.6 million through Christie's in 2016. "The Apollo is a true collector's gem," said Paragon International Wealth Management's Michael King. It's the largest internally flawless fancy vivid blue diamond ever auctioned. Less than 0.1 percent of diamonds have any blue coloring, and only a very small percentage of those are graded Fancy Vivid Blue, according to the Gemological Institute of America (GIA). The Artemis Pink is "the most chemically pure type," according to GIA. King and his colleagues at Paragon International Wealth Management had  high buyer interest in the pink and blue earrings earlier in May and cited the record-breaking sale of the "Pink Star" diamond for $71.2 million at Sotheby's in April 2017. King said that buyer interest and demand for fancy colored diamonds in the investment marketplace strong. "In the last five to 10 years, the price seems to be escalating rapidly," David Bennett, worldwide chairman of Sotheby's International Jewellery division, told . "Certainly people who own important colored diamonds are aware that the market is strong." Toronto-based is a leader in the acquisition and management of fancy colored diamonds as investments. Paragon International Wealth Management provides its clientele with unparalleled advice and guidance in assembling a successful hard asset investment portfolio. Over the last several years, fancy colored diamonds have shown significantly higher profit margins compared to other hard asset investments and are growing in popularity as an investment vehicle. Paragon International Wealth Management's combined experience in the colored diamond market enables clients to achieve the highest possible annual returns on their investments.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.gizmag.com

The world's most expensive earrings sold in Geneva on May 16, 2017, when the "Apollo and Artemis Diamonds" were sold to the same buyer for $41,255,566 and $15,035,061 respectively. The world's most expensive earrings sold in Geneva last night when the "Apollo and Artemis Diamonds" were snapped up by the same buyer for a total of $56,290,627. The Apollo earring is blue and much rarer than its pink Artemis partner, and hence the more expensive of the pair, which were sold as separate lots for $41,255,566 and $15,035,061, respectively. The paired gems sold at Sotheby's spring sale of Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels at the Mandarin Oriental in Geneva, with the Apollo Blue sold against an estimate of $38 to $50 million, and the Artemis Pink estimated at between $12.5 and $18 million. In the end, Apollo fetched CHF41,862,500 (US$41,255,566) and Artemis for CHF15,256,250 (US$15,035,061), for a total buy price of CHF57,118,750 (US$56,290,627). The sale of the world's most celebrated and valuable earrings follows closely on the sale of the world's most valuable gem stone on April 4, 2017, Sotheby's captured both records, selling the Pink Star for HK$553 million (US$71.2 million), and more than doubling the record for a fancy vivid pink diamond that was set at $31.56 million in Geneva in May 2016 for the 15.38-carat Unique Pink' diamond. The Pink Star was acquired by renowned jeweler Chow Tai Fook, and has joined a number of outstanding stones in the company's collection including the Aurora Green (a 5.03-carat vivid green diamond which set a new world record for a green diamond of US$16.8 million), and the Cullinan Heritage (a 507-carat rough diamond acquired for US$35.3 million in 2010). The Pink Star (now renamed the CTF Pink Star) is a 59.60-carat oval mixed-cut pink diamond, measuring 2.69 by 2.06 cm (1.06 by 0.81 in) and weighing 11.92 g (0.42 oz). It is the largest internally flawless fancy vivid pink diamond that the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has ever graded, and it received the highest color and clarity grades from the GIA for pink diamonds. Mined by De Beers in Africa in 1999, the 132.5-carat rough diamond was meticulously cut and polished over a period of two years and transformed into this stunning gemstone. The gem had been previously sold for a world record of $US83 million in 2013, but the buyer defaulted and Sotheby's had to buy it back the diamond. Not surprisingly, it claimed the record once more, though more than $10 million shy of the previous sale price. Gems and jewelry have, like art, long been considered an investment, but the gem marketplace has been returning excellent results of recent times and the prospects look good for both short and long term returns. The graphics above and below from the recently released Knight Frank Wealth Report clearly illustrate that colored diamonds and jewelry are performing exceptionally well compared to most alternative asset classes. The KFLII (Knight Frank Luxury Investment Index) is a composite index based on the weighted performance of existing indices for nine classes of collectable asset: fine art; Chinese ceramics; classic cars; coins; furniture; jewelry; stamps; watches; and fine wine. One of the advantages of these "investments of passion" is their low price volatility in comparison to standards such as the gold and shares. In the chart below, the volatility of various investment sectors is compared to gold and the FTSE (Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 Index) – a share index of the top 100 companies with the highest market capitalization on the London Stock Exchange, one of the most important market indices.


The two diamonds were named after Greek deities Apollo and Artemis. "The Apollo and Artemis diamonds will be the stars of our May sale in Geneva -- by far the most important pair of earrings ever offered at auction," said David Bennett, worldwide chairman of Sotheby's International Jewellery Division. "These exquisite colored diamonds are enormously rare and each is a wonderful stone in its own right. Together, as a pair of earrings, they are breathtaking." The 14.54-carat "Apollo Blue" is classified as a fancy vivid blue diamond, which is the highest diamond color grading ranking. Color grading is one of the key criteria for appraising the value of colored diamonds. The "Apollo Blue" is the largest of its color and clarity to go to auction. In fact, less than 0.1 percent of diamonds sourced show any blue, according to the Gemological Institute of America, and only a small percentage of those fall into the fancy vivid blue category.  Sotheby's expects the "Apollo Blue" to sell for $38 million to $50 million. Meanwhile, the 16-carat "Artemis Pink" is classified as a fancy intense pink diamond with a high clarity rating. It's expected to fetch $12.5 million to $18 million. A pink diamond "of such rich color and impressive size can only be described as phenomenally rare," Sotheby's said. Toronto-based is a leader in the acquisition and management of fancy colored diamonds and is committed to offering its clients unparalleled advice and guidance in assembling a successful hard asset investment portfolio. Fancy colored diamonds are growing in popularity as an investment vehicle and have historically shown higher profit margins than other hard asset investments.


Consumers nowadays, especially millennials, are increasingly demanding transparency in what goes in and on their bodies. And for some—what goes on their finger. “We’re asking questions about everything we buy now: I want to know that my makeup isn’t full of toxins, my clothing wasn’t made by children, and my food is free of pesticides,” says Melissa Mock, a 30-year-old tech startup executive who got engaged last summer. “So of course, I wanted to know about the origins of my diamond.” She and her now-fiancé had talked about her wishes for a rock that wasn’t mined by exploited workers or used to fund endless internecine conflicts, as highlighted in the 2006 film starring Leo DiCaprio, Blood Diamond. On Labor Day, in the garden of the home they share in Santa Monica, Mock’s boyfriend proposed to her with an emerald-cut, “Pinterest-perfect” diamond designed by Vrai & Oro. The stone was created by Diamond Foundry, a San Francisco startup that makes diamonds using a machine that heats carbon to temperatures as high as the outer layer of the sun. We’re not talking cubic zirconia here. The stones are atomically identical to diamonds that come out of the ground, and conflict-free. Mock was thrilled. “I love the idea that a diamond is this beautiful, high-quality stone that will not scratch and really does last forever,” she says. “Diamond Foundry had found a way to replicate a process that was happening in nature—they found a hack.” Mock and others like her are rewriting the rules of engagement traditions. Some are even choosing alternative gemstones, such as sapphires and opals. But among those who want diamonds, a growing number are considering lab-grown diamonds, according to a Bain survey. While sales of manmade diamonds amount to only 1% of the market, there’s reason to believe there’ll be major growth over the next decade. For one thing, the production of mined diamonds is expected to peak in 2019, according to The Economist. At that point, supplies of new diamonds will begin to decrease by one to two percent a year. Demand is also slowing: Bain’s 2016 Global Diamond Industry Report said the outlook for the $200 billion sector is challenging and “uncertainties cloud the social, political and economic environments in key markets.” The other thing the man-made bling has going for it is the retail price. Depending on the jeweler, you can save between 20% and 40% on a lab-grown version. “For the most popular shapes and sizes, the savings is 35%,” says Krish Himmatramka, the founder of Do Amore, an ethical jewelry startup that sells both kinds. For a one-carat diamond that is near colorless and clean to the naked eye, the cost of a mined diamond is about $5,000 at Do Amore, while a lab-grown diamond is closer to $3,300. “With that extra money, you could purchase the engagement ring setting and still have money left over,” Himmatramka says. DiCaprio had a major role in getting the man-made diamond industry established in the U.S. after learning about mining conditions in Africa, where Blood Diamond was set, and the violence the gems fed. “I was pretty horrified about what went on in Sierra Leone in the late 1990s and how diamonds funded these warlords,” he told Time. “Amnesty International projected around 4 million people lost their lives as a result of these diamond sales.” Diamond Foundry was founded in San Francisco in 2012 with $100 million in funding from a range of investors, including DiCaprio. Engineers from Stanford, M.I.T, and Princeton were also on board. It was one of three in the world turning out what are also called conflict-free diamonds. The other two are Singapore-based Generic Diamond and Russia-based New Diamond Technology. Diamond Foundry’s first challenge was technical: building a plasma reactor that could create a high-quality diamond. After years of running thousands of physics simulations, they put together a machine made up of hundreds of precision-engineered parts that would generate extreme heat, explains CEO Martin Roscheisen, who earned a PhD in engineering from Stanford, graduating from the same program and class as Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page. In nature, diamonds are formed when carbon is exposed to very high pressure deep in the Earth and are then carried back to the surface by volcanic eruptions. Part of their appeal comes from the fact that it takes a rare combination of geographical and geological factors for them to exist. Back in 1941, G.E. developed a machine that would heat carbon under pressure to create diamonds that could be used for industrial purposes, but those diamonds tended to be brittle and unsuitable for jewelry. With the production  process perfected, the next hurdle was cracking the gem market. Diamond Foundry created a collection of jewelry studded with diamonds that are nearly colorless and contain only very slight inclusions. Each piece is certified and graded by the Gemological Institute of America. When word spread about the Diamond Foundry’s work, brands across the diamond industry started reaching out, asking to buy some of this output. “We discovered a large industry under distress,” says Roscheisen. “Mined diamond supplies are declining, miners are extremely profitable but everybody following that in the supply chain is extremely squeezed.” Diamond Foundry’s diamonds entered the market in November 2015 and since then, its revenues have doubled every quarter, except for last quarter, when they tripled, according to Roscheisen. It is now in the process of quadrupling its capacity. The company sells its own jewelry line on its website, but it also sells through retailers like Barneys and the direct-to-consumer startup Vrai & Oro that designed Melissa Mock’s ring. “A lot of retailers right now love the fact that they now have an origin story around where the diamond comes from,” Roscheisen explains. “In any luxury product, provenance is really key. In the case of a mined diamond, you can’t really know, since it has changed hands two dozen times before it gets to you.” For decades, the diamond industry has been tainted by the fact that the quest for diamonds has often led to violence, warfare, and human suffering. Karen DeVincent, 29, who recently got engaged, said DiCaprio’s movie influenced the story behind her ring. “I didn’t want to have such a special moment in my life tarnished by somebody else’s pain,” says DeVincent, whose fiancé presented her a ring sporting a pink sapphire, her gem of choice. Vanessa Stofenmacher, founder and creative director of Vrai & Oro, says DeVincent’s perspective is fairly typical of the millennial generation, her target consumer. She’s spoken to hundreds of couples in their twenties and thirties as she was launching a collection of engagement and wedding rings. In her focus groups, some couples favored alternative gems, but others were keen on diamonds, but wary of their same ethical baggage. “A diamond is still an instant symbol,” Stofenmacher says. “You can put it on Instagram and everyone knows you’re engaged.” Vrai & Oro exclusively uses diamonds grown by the Diamond Foundry and she’s found that millennials have been quick to adopt the idea of the synthetic diamond. “In most cases, they actually prefer them,” Stofenmacher says. “This is the first time they are being introduced to diamonds, so they are a lot easier to educate than someone who has been buying diamonds for 30 or 40 years.” Krish Himmatramka, the founder of Do Amore, gives buyers a wide range of choices: mined diamonds, lab-grown diamonds (from the Russian company New Diamond Technology), sapphires, and clear white gem called moissanites. “Millennials don’t believe that mined diamonds are somehow superior,” Himmatramka says. “Our brand tends to attract customers who care about ethics, but we’re finding that we don’t need to make the case that they should consider an alternative to a diamond.” But even though American millennials tend to be an easy sell when it comes to lab-grown diamonds, Diamond Foundry execs know there is a lot of work to be done to really disrupt the traditional diamond industry. For one thing, older generations have more money to spend on diamond jewelry and for another, the logic that convinces an American audience to buy man-made diamonds won’t necessarily convince Indian or Chinese consumers. Bain’s survey of millennials around the world found that the concept of lab-grown diamonds was slowly catching on. Young people in China, like those in the U.S., cited the lower price of synthetic diamonds as a key decision driver, while those in India appreciated the better ratio of price to quality. In both China and India, young people liked the cool technology that goes into making the diamonds. But there were also some negative associations with words like “fake,” “not real,” and “cheap” bandied about. “There is always a lot of education around any new technology,” Roscheisen says. “A big task that we have is introducing this new product category to the market. When people are not educated about lab-grown diamonds there is initial skepticism. We have to explain that the diamonds are literally the same (as those from the earth).”


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

NEW YORK - Dec. 15, 2016 - Breakthrough research led by GIA Postdoctoral Research Fellow Evan Smith examines diamonds of exceptional size and quality to uncover clues about Earth's geology. The researchers studied the unique properties of diamonds with similar characteristics to famous stones such as the Cullinan, Constellation and Koh-i-Noor to advance our understanding of Earth's deep mantle, hidden beneath tectonic plates and largely inaccessible for scientific observation. The study is published in the most recent issue of Science magazine. "Some of the world's largest and most valuable diamonds, like the Cullinan or Lesotho Promise, exhibit a distinct set of physical characteristics that have led many to regard them as separate from other, more common diamonds. However, exactly how these diamonds form and what they tell us about the Earth has remained a mystery until now," explains Dr. Wuyi Wang, GIA's director of research and development, and an author of the study. Large gem diamonds like the Cullinan have a set of physical characteristics that distinguish them from other kinds of diamonds. The new research shows these Cullinan-like gems sometimes have small metallic inclusions - or internal characteristics - trapped within them. The metallic inclusions coexist with traces of fluid methane and hydrogen. In addition to the metallic inclusions, some of these exceptional diamonds contain mineral inclusions that show the diamonds formed at extreme depths, likely within 360-750 km (approximately 224-466 miles) in the convecting mantle. This is much deeper than most other gem diamonds, which form in the lower part of continental tectonic plates at depths of 150-200 km (approximately 93-124 miles). "This new understanding of these large, type IIa diamonds resolves one of the major enigmas in the study of diamond formation - how the world's largest and most valuable diamonds formed," says Smith. "The composition of the inclusions, however, provides the story." The metallic inclusions are a solidified mixture of iron, nickel, carbon and sulfur, also containing traces of fluid methane and hydrogen in the thin tiny space between the metallic phases and the encasing diamond. Pure carbon crystallized in this mix of molten metallic liquid in Earth's deep mantle to form diamonds. Small droplets of this metallic liquid were occasionally trapped within the diamonds as they grew. During cutting and polishing, parts of the diamond that contain inclusions are often cut off or polished away to craft exquisite polished gems with minimal flaws. These cut diamond pieces are not normally available for research, but because of GIA's unique position as an independent, nonprofit research organization, Dr. Smith and his coauthors were able to study the inclusions for this investigation. "Previous experiments and theory predicted for many years that parts of the deep mantle below about 250 km depth contain small amounts of metallic iron and have limited available oxygen. Now, the metallic inclusions and their surrounding methane and hydrogen jackets in these diamonds provide consistent, systematic physical evidence to support this prediction," explains Smith. Though the extent of metal distribution is uncertain, this key observation has broad implications for understanding the behavior of the deep Earth, including the recycling of surface rocks into the convecting mantle, and the deep storage and cycling of carbon and hydrogen in the mantle through geologic time. Smith's team included GIA's Wuyi Wang; Steven Shirey, Emma Bullock and Jianhua Wang from the Carnegie Institution for Science; Fabrizio Nestola from Department of Geosciences at the University of Padova; and Stephen Richardson from the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Cape Town. Smith, an expert in diamond geology, began his postdoctoral research fellowship with GIA in 2015. His work focuses on systematically characterizing the inclusions he sees in rare types of diamonds to fill in some of the missing pieces in our understanding of how diamonds form and what they mean for the evolution of the planet. He holds a Ph.D. in geology from the University of British Columbia and a Bachelor of Applied Science and Master of Engineering from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. An independent nonprofit organization, GIA (Gemological Institute of America), established in 1931, is recognized as the world's foremost authority in gemology. GIA invented the famous 4Cs of Color, Cut, Clarity and Carat Weight in the early 1950s and in 1953, created the International Diamond Grading SystemT which, today, is recognized by virtually every professional jeweler in the world. Through research, education, gemological laboratory services, and instrument development, the Institute is dedicated to ensuring the public trust in gems and jewelry by upholding the highest standards of integrity, academics, science, and professionalism. Visit www.gia.edu.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Katherine Jetter announces the opening of an exhibition of opals from around the globe at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science on Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, of which she is the guest curator. The Wonderful World of Opals features cut and uncut stones from Australia, Mexico, Ethiopia and Peru, as well as some set opal jewels from Jetter’s own collection. A one-of-a-kind rough opal specimen from Australia that weighs over 160 pounds is also part of the show. Grand opening events for the public include short talks, displays, and demonstrations at the museum on Feb. 10, and Feb. 11, 2017. Jetter was approached by the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs in 2016 and worked to produce a collection of over 50 specimens, some of the finest in the world, one of which is encased in a fossilized dinosaur bone. Jetter collaborated with some of the world’s foremost opal miners, two of who will be present at a private reception on February 9: Bill Kasso of Eagle Creek Opals and Charlie Alsen of Opal Country. Other contributing miners include Andrew and Damien Cody of Cody Opal, Juergen Schuetz of Emil Weis and Susan Cooper of Broken River Mining. Jetter was recently selected by jewelry historian Olivier Dupon as one of his top picks of 35 contemporary jewelers in the world, featured in his newly launched book Fine Jewelry Couture: Contemporary Heirlooms. "This is an exceptional collection of opals curated by a leader in the opal industry,” said Margie Marino, director of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science. “The Museum is very proud to be able to work with world-wide partners to bring this exhibition to the people of New Mexico. This is a rare opportunity for visitors to the Museum to see a whole opal in its raw state and examine how it is formed,” she said. A number of collaborative and educational events have been scheduled for the opening weekend to enhance the visitor experience. Events Scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017 Free with Museum Admission 10am to 3pm: Rock, mineral and gem demonstrations and displays by the Albuquerque Gem and Mineral Club/Museum Lapidary Studio FOR MEDIA INQUIRIES (including images and information about the private reception on February 9): Jennifer Hobson-Hinsley Jennifer(@)jlhmedia(.)com 505 603 8643 ### ABOUT KATHERINE JETTER LTD: Katherine Jetter was born in Melbourne, Australia and spent her youth in England, Germany, Italy, and Switzerland. After attending SevenOaks School in Kent, UK, Katherine received a Bachelors Degree in Clinical Psychology from University College of London followed by an analyst position at JP Morgan. After attending the globally renowned Gemological Institute of America (GIA) and receiving certification as a Graduate Gemologist and Jewelry Designer, Katherine put her expertise to use by working for various international, high-end designer jewelers, including De Beers. Launching Katherine Jetter Ltd. in 2008, her collection was immediately picked up by Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus after showcasing at the prestigious Couture Jewelry Show in 2009. Katherine’s beautiful collections are featured in numerous retailers worldwide from Moscow to China including a selection of Neiman Marcus stores and high profile independent retailers across the U.S. Katherine and her husband, Daniel Burrell, moved to Santa Fe in 2010. They are active philanthropists in the community, with a key focus on furthering education for young people in New Mexico and have formed a foundation to support these efforts, the New Mexico Leadership Institute (NMLI), of which Katherine is President. NMLI partners with The University of New Mexico (UNM), New Mexico State University (NMSU) and top business leaders to provide New Mexico high school students with training and mentoring designed to develop effective leadership skills. Katherine is also on the Executive Board for NDI (New Mexico Dance Institute), and ran the Garfield Street Foundation on behalf of Rosemont Realty for 3 years. Katherine and Daniel have a daughter, Dylan, who is two years old. ABOUT THE NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY & SCIENCE: The New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science is a Division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. The Department of Cultural Affairs is New Mexico’s cultural steward and is charged with preserving and showcasing the state’s cultural riches. With its eight museums, eight historic monuments, arts, archaeology, historic preservation and library programs, the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs is the largest state cultural agency in the nation.


News Article | March 3, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

HONG KONG, March 3, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- The JNA Awards, one of the world's most prestigious awards in the jewellery and gemstone industry, is now calling for entries for its sixth edition. Organised by JNA, the annual JNA Awards is set to further advance and propel Asia's jewellery and gemstone sector by recognising and honouring companies and individuals that have exhibited innovation, excellence, best business practices and outstanding business performance. There is no fee to enter the prestigious international award. Qualified companies and individuals, including past entrants, from around the world are invited to self-nominate or nominate others in the following categories: 1.   Brand of the Year -- Retail 2.   Industry Innovation of the Year 3.   Manufacturer of the Year -- Jewellery 4.   Outstanding Enterprise of the Year -- ASEAN 5.   Outstanding Enterprise of the Year -- Greater China 6.   Outstanding Enterprise of the Year -- India 7.   Retailer of the Year (450 outlets and below) 8.   eSupplier of the Year 9.   Sustainability Initiative of the Year 10. Young Entrepreneur of the Year (Age 40 and below) The Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient will be nominated by the Awards organiser and further announcement will be made at a later date. Entries will be evaluated by an esteemed panel of judges comprised of five international industry experts, namely Albert Cheng, Advisor to the World Gold Council and former Managing Director, Far East (WGC); James Courage, former Chief Executive of Platinum Guild International (PGI) and former Chairman of the Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC); Lin Qiang, President and Managing Director of the Shanghai Diamond Exchange (SDE); Nirupa Bhatt, Managing Director of the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) in India and the Middle East; and Yasukazu Suwa, Chairman of Suwa & Son, Inc. Since the Awards is gaining wider recognition and higher participation rate, the organiser said more interviews or site visits will be conducted as part of the judging process.  Entrants who submit their nominations or register early would likely increase their chances of being interviewed or visited by members of the judging panel to gain a better understanding of their operations and business models. Letitia Chow, Founder of JNA, Chairperson of the JNA Awards and Director of Business Development -- Jewellery Group at UBM Asia, said, "The JNA Awards is a powerful channel for companies to showcase their businesses. We find it very promising to see past Recipients and Honourees leveraging the value of the Awards to raise their profile among the most respected and admired names in the industry, and gain recognition within the trade." The JNA Awards 2017 is supported by Headline Partners Rio Tinto Diamonds and Chow Tai Fook (CTF), together with the Shanghai Diamond Exchange (SDE), Guangdong Gems & Jade Exchange, and Guangdong Land Holdings Limited (GDLAND) serving as Honoured Partners. Rita Maltez, Director of Rio Tinto Diamonds for Greater China, said, "The JNA Awards has become an important platform for the gem and jewellery industry to come together, share successes and generate new ideas. Rio Tinto is delighted to have been a supporter of the Awards from the beginning, and to help nurture its growth, together with the organisers and the other awards partners, into one of the most important events in the industry calendar. We look forward to another successful year for the Awards in 2017." "Over the last few years, it has been exciting to witness various innovations from our peers to enhance their competitiveness, which have resulted in tremendous advancements in the jewellery industry amid a challenging operating environment. We look forward to having more outstanding participants bringing new insights to the industry and striving together to drive the jewellery industry forward," said Kent Wong, Managing Director of Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group. To enter the JNA Awards, interested parties must complete and submit the entry form on or no later than midnight (Hong Kong time) of 5 May 2017. The Honourees or shortlisted entrants will be announced on 22 June 2017 at the June Hong Kong Jewellery & Gem Fair. JNA is the organiser of the JNA Awards and is the flagship publication of UBM Asia's Jewellery Group. First published in 1983, the title is the leader in providing up-to-date international jewellery trade news with an Asian insight. It features original, in-depth reports by experienced journalists covering the latest developments in the diamond, pearl, coloured gemstone, jewellery manufacturing, and equipment and supplies sectors. Rio Tinto Diamonds is one of the world's leading diamond producers and operates a globally integrated mine-to-market diamond business. For over three decades, the company has been an important participant in the international diamond market with two world-class underground diamond mines in Australia (Argyle) and Canada (Diavik). Rio Tinto's diamond sales and marketing activities, headquartered in Antwerp, Belgium, are supported by a network of representative offices in Hong Kong, Mumbai and New York. Rio Tinto believes in supporting consumer confidence in its diamonds and plays an active role in addressing key industry issues surrounding product integrity and sustainable development. It is a leading supporter of the Kimberley Process, as well as a founding member of the Responsible Jewellery Council and the Diamond Producers Association. Chow Tai Fook Jewellery Group Limited (Stock Code: 1929) was listed on the Main Board of The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong in December 2011. The iconic brand "Chow Tai Fook" of the Group has been widely recognised for its trustworthiness and authenticity, and renowned for product design, quality and value. The acquisition of Hearts On Fire, an internationally acclaimed U.S. premium diamond brand, in August 2014 has further underpinned the Group's stature as a diamond expert in the industry. The Group boasts an extensive retail network comprising over 2,300 POS of Chow Tai Fook and Hearts On Fire spanning more than 500 cities in Greater China, Singapore, Malaysia, Korea and the United States, as well as a fast growing e-tail network through operating its Chow Tai Fook e-shop and other e-tail accounts on major online shopping platforms. The Group's sophisticated vertically integrated business model provides it with an effective and tight control over the entire operation chain from raw material procurement, design, production, to marketing and sales through its extensive distribution channels. Authorised by the State Council, the Shanghai Diamond Exchange (SDE) is the only diamond exchange in China and provides diamond dealers a fair and safe transaction venue under close supervision. It also enjoys a favourable taxation policy and is operated in accordance with international best practices of the diamond industry. Established in 2000, the SDE is a non-profit, self-regulating membership organisation and a member of the World Federation of Diamond Bourses. Founded in February 2016, the Guangdong Gems & Jade Exchange is one of two provincial jewellery trading platforms authorised by the People's Government of Guangdong Province. Aggregating resources from key industrial hubs across Guangdong including Guangzhou, Pingzhou of Foshan, Yangmei of Jieyang and Sihui of Zhaoqing, the Guangdong Gems & Jade Exchange joins hands with world-renowned jewellery brands in setting up an international supply chain integrated service platform that offers a secure and convenient trading experience for domestic and overseas jewellers. The Guangdong Gems & Jade Exchange is set to benefit China's jewellery industry in a variety of areas, such as the promotion of a healthier and more balanced international division of labour, foreign trade development, cross-border resource management and consumer market growth. As part of this effort, it will take full advantage of the base and influence of Guangdong's jewellery industry and the benefits stemming from the Belt and Road Initiative to establish linkages with national and global gemstone and jewellery markets. The Guangdong Land Holdings Limited (GDLAND), with its headquarters in Hong Kong, is listed on The Stock Exchange of Hong Kong Limited, and is a subsidiary of GDH Limited, which is Guangdong Province's largest conglomerate operating outside Mainland China. The principal business of GDLAND is property development and investment, including but not limited to the development and operational management of the innovative commercial real estate, urban complex and industrial business complex. As the strategic arm of GDH Limited, GDLAND engages in the business development of commercial real estate, as well as the projects of urban and industrial complex. GDLAND's flagship project, namely the "Buxin Project", is planned to become the biggest and most advanced jewellery mart in the world, including a large-scale jewellery trading and exhibition centre along with other facilities, with a lot size of over 87,000 square metres and the construction scale (floor area) is expected to be more than 700,000 square metres. The Buxin Project, which is located in the Buxin area of Luohu district in Central Shenzhen, close to the Shuibei Gold and Jewellery Base, is expected to develop the area into one of the most influential gold and jewellery trading and exchange platforms in China and around the world. Owned by UBM plc listed on the London Stock Exchange, UBM Asia is the largest trade show organiser in Asia and the largest commercial organiser in China, India, Thailand and Malaysia. Established with its headquarters in Hong Kong and subsidiary companies across Asia and in the US, UBM Asia has a strong global presence in 24 major cities with 32 offices and 1,300 staff. With a track record spanning over 30 years, UBM Asia operates in 19 market sectors with 230 events, 28 targeted trade publications, 18 round-the-clock online products for over 2,000,000 quality exhibitors, visitors, conference delegates, advertisers and subscribers from all over the world. We provide a one-stop diversified global service for high-value business matching, quality market news and online trading networks. UBM Asia has extensive office networks in China, Southeast Asia and India, three of the world's fastest growing B2B events markets. UBM China has 12 offices in the major cities in mainland China, including Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Guzhen and Shenzhen, where we organise 90 events. In ASEAN, UBM Asia operates from its offices in Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam and the Philippines with 70 events in this region. UBM India teams in Mumbai, New Delhi, Bengaluru and Chennai organise over 20 events every year across the country. UBM Asia was awarded 'Asia's Most Reliable Trade Show Organizer Award' in Hong Kong's Most Valuable Companies Awards (HKMVCA) 2016.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Leo Hamel Fine Jewelers joined other well-established companies at the 2016 Jewelry Career Fair & Open House, organized annually by the Gemological Institute of America. The event was held at the Institute’s Robert Mouawad campus in Carlsbad, California. The event traditionally attracts job seekers and jewelry lovers alike, and 2016 was no exception. Visitors could participate in one-on-one career coaching sessions, attend two panel presentations and demonstrations, and also enjoy more than 1,000 gems on display at the GIA Museum. Leo Hamel Fine Jewelers was one of the industry recruiters at the fair, seeking candidates for the following positions: Estate Buyer, Sales Assistant, Sales Professional, Processor and Master Bench Jeweler. As a recurrent recruiter at GIA’s Jewelry Career Fair, Leo Hamel Fine Jewelers is happy to reach out to Graduate Gemologists and other gem and jewelry specialists from the area. Faithful to its credo, the company employs Graduate Gemologists and other personnel with relevant experience so as to ensure all work stays in-house, from price estimation to repairs. ‘’We always look for dedicated professionals to join our team. We nurture a sense of togetherness and familiarity, both within the company and towards our customers. Just like our master jewelers have been instrumental in the company’s long-lasting success, so was our sales team. That is why each new staff member is like a family member here at Leo Hamel's,’’ said Leo Hamel, owner and CEO. About Leo Hamel Fine Jewelers: Leo Hamel Fine Jewelers is one of the leading full-service jewelry stores in San Diego. Family-owned and operated for 36 years, the company adopts a fully personalized approach to customers throughout San Diego, welcoming them to the Leo Hamel family. The company reaches out to the wider community through its jewelry buying locations in San Diego, La Mesa, Solana Beach, Oceanside and Rancho Bernardo. Leo Hamel Fine Jewelers boasts honors such as San Diego’s Best Wedding Rings in 2013 and 2014 in the San Diego A-List contest, San Diego’s Best Jeweler in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 and Best Pawn/Resale Shop in 2014 and 2015 in the Union Tribune’s San Diego’s BEST polls, as well as Best Jewelry Store in Citybeat’s 2013, 2014 and 2015 Readers Poll.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

PLANO, Texas, Nov. 17, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Epsilon®, an Alliance Data (NYSE: ADS) company, today announced that it has been named agency of record for GIA (Gemological Institute of America), the world's foremost authority in gemology, for its consumer outreach campaign following a...


Salisbury, Maryland Jewelry Retailer now offers its customers “Experiences that last a Lifetime™” Salisbury, MD, March 02, 2017 --( First established in 1853, then purchased in 1923 by John A. Kuhn and renamed “Kuhn’s Jewelers,” the business has been family run for nearly 100 years and is currently owned and operated by Susan Purnell, daughter of the late Jack Purnell. Susan, a graduate gemologist from the Gemological Institute of America, heads up an experienced staff that offers services including Rolex watch repair and appraisals, jewelry repair, name brand watch repairs, as well as estate and insurance appraisals. A glimpse inside the Kuhn’s Jewelers showcases tells you everything you need to know about what sets Kuhn’s apart from many of the other “Here today, gone tomorrow” discount jewelry businesses. The quality and selection of merchandise available at Kuhn’s Jewelers, which ranges from fine diamond merchandise, pearls, and estate pieces, as well as the large collection of giftware, makes Kuhn’s Jewelers a unique shopping destination for many upscale Maryland shoppers looking for the perfect something special. As the newest member of Preferred Jewelers International™, Kuhn’s Jewelers joins an elite international network of independent retail jewelers who are dedicated to providing excellence in service, support and value. Kuhn’s Jewelers now offers the Preferred Lifetime Nationwide Warranty, which is included, when applicable, in customer’s purchases at no additional charge. The Preferred Warranty fully guarantees workmanship and materials on customer purchases. If service is required, the customer would simply go to a Preferred Jeweler and it will be repaired and serviced at no charge. The Lifetime Nationwide Warranty program also includes the replacement of any missing diamonds up to 0.20 ctw. With the addition of the Preferred Lifetime Nationwide Warranty, Kuhn’s Jewelers customers have the benefit of nationwide protection and assurance and trust for all their fine jewelry purchases. For more information about Kuhn’s Jewelers, and the new Preferred Lifetime Nationwide Warranty Program, please call (410) 742-3256 or visit their website at: www.KuhnsJewelers.com Salisbury, MD, March 02, 2017 --( PR.com )-- If you are a history buff who loves a business with a story to tell, then you will love Kuhn’s Jewelers! This gem of a jewelry and giftware store, located in Salisbury, Maryland, is not only the city’s oldest jewelry store, it also happens to be the sixth oldest, continuously operated business of its kind in the United States.First established in 1853, then purchased in 1923 by John A. Kuhn and renamed “Kuhn’s Jewelers,” the business has been family run for nearly 100 years and is currently owned and operated by Susan Purnell, daughter of the late Jack Purnell. Susan, a graduate gemologist from the Gemological Institute of America, heads up an experienced staff that offers services including Rolex watch repair and appraisals, jewelry repair, name brand watch repairs, as well as estate and insurance appraisals.A glimpse inside the Kuhn’s Jewelers showcases tells you everything you need to know about what sets Kuhn’s apart from many of the other “Here today, gone tomorrow” discount jewelry businesses. The quality and selection of merchandise available at Kuhn’s Jewelers, which ranges from fine diamond merchandise, pearls, and estate pieces, as well as the large collection of giftware, makes Kuhn’s Jewelers a unique shopping destination for many upscale Maryland shoppers looking for the perfect something special.As the newest member of Preferred Jewelers International™, Kuhn’s Jewelers joins an elite international network of independent retail jewelers who are dedicated to providing excellence in service, support and value. Kuhn’s Jewelers now offers the Preferred Lifetime Nationwide Warranty, which is included, when applicable, in customer’s purchases at no additional charge.The Preferred Warranty fully guarantees workmanship and materials on customer purchases. If service is required, the customer would simply go to a Preferred Jeweler and it will be repaired and serviced at no charge. The Lifetime Nationwide Warranty program also includes the replacement of any missing diamonds up to 0.20 ctw.With the addition of the Preferred Lifetime Nationwide Warranty, Kuhn’s Jewelers customers have the benefit of nationwide protection and assurance and trust for all their fine jewelry purchases.For more information about Kuhn’s Jewelers, and the new Preferred Lifetime Nationwide Warranty Program, please call (410) 742-3256 or visit their website at: www.KuhnsJewelers.com Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Preferred Jewelers International

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