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Lahore, Pakistan
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Lahore, Pakistan

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WILMINGTON, NC, December 01, 2016-- Rico Austin, author of 'My Bad Tequila', has been named as a finalist in the '50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading' Book Awards Contest. His honors came as a result of his appearance on The Authors Show. Rico Austin was chosen from a field of hundreds of authors through a public voting process. 'My Bad Tequila' details one man's epic journey across two continents and four countries with 50 years of adventure. But 1986 changed everything forever, when one event devastated the lives of 19 students, three chaperones and one bus driver. Was it the tequila?"I wrote this book," Austin stated, "because I had to purge myself of this fateful Spring Break trip of 1986. I felt the need to share the perils of binge drinking, engaging in irresponsible sex and what happens when college and high school students don't think twice about what happens when bad decisions are made and acted upon.""Thinking about sending your 'Kids' to paradise unsupervised? THINK AGAIN.""You'll see the true reflection of me when the tequila bottle is empty." - Rico AustinAustin has won numerous writing awards throughout his writing career:Hollywood Book Festival - Honorable Mention (Wild Card genre 2011)Readers Favorite Book Awards - Silver (Fiction - Mystery - General genre 2011)Amazon eKindle - #1 Top Rated Kindle eBooks (Mexico Travel genre 2011)"Five Parrots in a Palm Tree" - Superb Island Reading award 2011#1 Book to Read, June 2011 - NY Professional Reviewer, Fran LewisReaders Favorite Book Awards - Finalist (Fiction - General genre 2011)Arizona Authors Association - 3rd Place (Fiction Book of the Year 2011 - 2012)London Book Festival - Honorable Mention (Wild Card genre 2012)Los Angeles Book Festival - Honorable Mention (Wild Card genre 2011-2012)New York Beach Book Festival - Honorable Mention (General Non-Fiction genre 2012)New Mexico - Arizona Book Awards - Finalist (Fiction - Mystery genre 2012)Bibliocracy.com - Author of the Month (June 2012)Suspense Magazine - Review & Article (July 2012 issue)tBook Town - February's Book of the Month (March 2013)Austin is also the author of a number of other books:'In the Shadow of ELVIS, Perils of a Ghostwriter' - Autobiography, Memoir; This is the true story of how and when Rico met the legitimate, illegitimate son of the King of Rock 'n' Roll, Mr. Elvis Presley. These are the trials and tribulations of ghostwriting John Dennis Smith's epic and incredible mystery of being adopted and discovering his birthright.'ARIZONA Is Where I Live' - Children's book; ARIZONA Is Where I Live is a masterful and learning display of the Sonoran Desert, the mountains, the lakes, the Grand Canyon and of the animals that make Arizona one of the most unique and interesting states in the Union.'Son of the KING, an ELVIS Paradox Unveiled' - Biography; This biography is the true story of Elvis the King of Rock n' Roll and his legitimate, illegitimate son. This book explores the relationships of those closest to Elvis Presley and the influences each of them had that kept Elvis from claiming his first born John Smith Presley.'MEXICO Got LUCKY' - Non Fiction; Lucky, the most famous dog in all of Sonora, Mexico was dog napped on March 1st, 2014. Was it a prank gone bad by teenagers? Did it involve the ruthless, Sinaloa Drug Cartel, deadliest in the world? Or was it just a lowlife dog thief?'Author, Artist & Anyone's Personal Marketing Guide: Financial Success with 11 Proven Promotions Including Blogs & Social Media' is Rico's sixth book.'Entrepreneur, Realtor & Anyone's Personal Marketing Guide: Financial Success with 10 Proven Promotions Including Blogs & Social Media' was Rico's seventh book published.'BAJA LOCO, 4 Racing Days & Tequila Nights on the NORRA Mexican 1000' - Memoir: This is the true adventure of the Azunia Tequila / General Tire race team and author Rico Austin's journey of the 2014 Mexican BAJA 1000 which was published this last November 2016.Members of the public who want to vote for Rico Austin in the '50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading' Book Awards can access his entry and vote at The Authors Show site at http://www.TheAuthorsShow.com . Rico Austin is available for media interviews and can be reached using the information below, or by email at rico_thunderbird@yahoo.com . All of Austin's books are available at online retail book outlets. More information is available at Rico Austin's website at http://blog.mybadtequila.com Rico Austin earned an Associate Degree in Marketing and Sales from BSU. Rico moved to the Phoenix/Scottsdale area and continued his education receiving a Bachelors of Business Administration in International Business at Grand Canyon University, named the "Outstanding International Business Graduate of 1995." That same year he was also selected as "Mr. Future Business Executive" at the State Leadership Conference which included all universities in the State of Arizona.The summer before graduating, Rico went to Vilnius, Lithuania, and taught English (ESL). During fall semester of his senior year at GCU, Rico attended Staffordshire University in England where he also started on the American Football Team for the Staffordshire Stallions. Rico finished his Masters, an MBA in International Management at Thunderbird School of Global Management with a focus on the Latin America Region and the Spanish language. He appeared in a cameo appearance on Baywatch where he played the role of a drug lord.Rico was selected for the May 19th, 2013 issue to represent Arizona in fellow author, Annette Synder's popular blog, Fifty Authors from Fifty States, which spotlights writing professionals across the Fifty United States. He was again chosen to represent his home state of Idaho on March 23rd, 2014, and was named for writing about Arizona on January 17th, 2016. Rico was also chosen from among several hundred writers and bloggers to help compile a booklet with 13 other prominent authors. 'How to Create Credibility as a Freelancer - 70 Tips from a Collection of Experts' was published in December 2009.


News Article | March 31, 2016
Site: phys.org

Starting from the four innermost letters and working to the outermost ring, this table shows shows which three-letter base sequence or codon encodes which amino acid. In the journal Angewandte Chemie International Ed., researchers from the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and Yale University have discovered that microorganisms recognize more than one codon for the rare, genetically encoded amino acid selenocysteine. Credit: Wikimedia Commons A, C, G and T - stand in for the four chemical bases that store information in DNA. A sequence of these same four letters, repeating in a particular order, genetically defines an organism. Within the genome sequence are shorter, three-letter codons that represent one of the 20 regularly used amino acids, with three of the possible 64 three-letter codons reserved for stop signals. These amino acids are the building blocks of proteins that carry out a myriad of functions. For example, the amino acid alanine can be represented by the three-letter codon GCU and the amino acid cysteine by the three-letter codon UGU. In some organisms, the three-letter codon UGA, which normally signals the end of a protein-coding gene, is hijacked to code for a rare genetically encoded amino acid called selenocysteine. Published ahead online March 16, 2016 in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Ed., researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and Yale University have discovered that microorganisms recognize more than one codon for selenocysteine. The finding adds credence to recent studies indicating that an organism's genetic vocabulary is not as constrained as had been long held. The work is a follow-up to two 2014 publications; a Science paper by the JGI group finding that some organisms interpret the three "stop" codons which terminate translation to mean anything but. A synthetic biology experiment of the Yale group published in an Angewandte Chemie International Ed. paper revealed the astonishing fact that almost all codons in Escherichia coli could be replaced by selenocysteine. This posed the question whether the same phenomenon can also occur in nature. "Access to the tremendous resources at the JGI allowed us to quickly test challenging hypotheses generated from my research projects that have been supported over the long-term by DOE Basic Energy Sicences and the National Institutes of Health," said Dieter Soll, Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry Professor of Chemistry at Yale, the lead author of the paper. Thus a fruitful collaboration resulted; the combined team scanned trillions of base pairs of public microbial genomes and unassembled metagenome data in the National Center for Biotechnology Information and the DOE JGI's Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) data management system to find stop codon reassignments in bacteria and bacteriophages. Delving into genomic data from uncultured microbes afforded researchers the opportunity to learn more about how microbes behave in their natural environments, which in turn provides information on their management of the various biogeochemical cycles that help maintain the Earth. From approximately 6.4 trillion bases of metagenomic sequence and 25,000 microbial genomes, the team identified several species that recognize the stop codons UAG and UAA, in addition to 10 sense codons, as acceptable variants for the selenocysteine codon UGA. The findings, the team reported, "opens our minds to the possible existence of other coding schemes... Overall our approach provides new evidence of a limited but unequivocal plasticity of the genetic code whose secrets still lie hidden in the majority of unsequenced organisms." This finding also illustrates the context-dependency of the genetic code, that accurately "reading" the code (and interpreting DNA sequences) and ultimately "writing" DNA (synthesizing sequences to carry out defined functions in bioenergy or environmental sciences) will require study of the language of DNA past the introductory course level. Explore further: Simplifying genetic codes to look back in time More information: Takahito Mukai et al. Facile Recoding of Selenocysteine in Nature, Angewandte Chemie International Edition (2016). DOI: 10.1002/anie.201511657


Lin X.,Capital Medical University | Farooqi A.A.,Laboratory for Translational Oncology and Personalized Medicine | Qureshi M.Z.,GCU | Romero M.A.,Autonomous University of Guerrero | And 2 more authors.
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis | Year: 2016

It is becoming characteristically more understandable that within tumor cells, there lies a sub-population of tumor cells with “stem cell” like properties and remarkable ability of self-renewal. Many features of these self-renewing cells are comparable with normal stem cells and are termed as “cancer stem cells”. Accumulating experimentally verified data has started to scratch the surface of spatio-temporally dysregulated intracellular signaling cascades in the biology of prostate cancer stem cells. We partition this multicomponent review into how different signaling cascades operate in cancer stem cells and how bioactive ingredients isolated from natural sources may modulate signaling network. © 2016, L. Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Wroclaw, Poland.


PubMed | Autonomous University of Guerrero, Institute of Biomedical and Genetic Engineering IBGE, GCU, Laboratory for Translational Oncology and Personalized Medicine and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Archivum immunologiae et therapiae experimentalis | Year: 2016

It is becoming characteristically more understandable that within tumor cells, there lies a sub-population of tumor cells with stem cell like properties and remarkable ability of self-renewal. Many features of these self-renewing cells are comparable with normal stem cells and are termed as cancer stem cells. Accumulating experimentally verified data has started to scratch the surface of spatio-temporally dysregulated intracellular signaling cascades in the biology of prostate cancer stem cells. We partition this multicomponent review into how different signaling cascades operate in cancer stem cells and how bioactive ingredients isolated from natural sources may modulate signaling network.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Researchers, including several University of Otago academics, have conducted the first trial of pelvic floor muscle training for the prevention of prolapse symptoms in women with early signs of prolapse several years after childbirth, publishing their findings in the world's leading medical journal The Lancet. Pelvic organ prolapse - when the bladder, womb or bowel moves downward from its normal position - is common and is associated with childbirth and increasing age. The symptoms of prolapse, such as a feeling of something 'coming down', urinary and bowel issues, affect up to 30% of women. Led by Professor Suzanne Hagen, Programme Director at the Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit at Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU), and funded by Wellbeing of Women - the UK's only charity that funds medical research into women's reproductive and gynaecological health, researchers conducted a trial with 414 women in the UK and New Zealand to identify the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training on the development of prolapse symptoms. The study compared women who were provided with one-to-one pelvic floor muscle training (five physiotherapy appointments over 16 weeks, including tailored lifestyle advice) plus Pilates-based pelvic floor muscle training classes and a DVD for guided home exercise, with the other half of the group, who received only a prolapse lifestyle advice leaflet. The study found the intervention led to fewer prolapse symptoms. Within two years, a significantly higher proportion (14.4% compared to 6%) of the women who did not have the pelvic floor muscle training reported having had prolapse treatment, which includes surgery, pessaries, physiotherapy or GP consultation. "Taking part has helped me realise some of the effects childbirth and ageing has had on my body and how I need to look after myself to ensure I keep fit and healthy. I feel more positive about ageing /menopause - it is always good to know that you are not the only one going through something. I have benefited physically and mentally." "Since taking part in the study and attending both 1:1 physiotherapy sessions and group Pilates there has been a noticeable difference to the incontinence I was experiencing. I am now more confident when going out, no longer need to plan journeys around toilets. This has made so much difference to my quality of life. Talking to friends and work colleagues, it's amazing how many other women are suffering in silence as they are too embarrassed to go to their GP." The researchers, from GCU, the universities of Aberdeen and Birmingham and the University of Otago, claimed women should be recommended to undertake pelvic floor muscle training even before they have bothersome symptoms. Professor Hagen said: "Knowing that these exercises and lifestyle advice can help to avoid symptoms in the future will allow women to be proactive about maintaining their pelvic floor health. Wellbeing of Women has provided invaluable support for an important, but often overlooked and difficult to fund area of research, which has undoubtedly helped many women who are at risk of these problems." Professor Hagen is also author of the Cochrane review of conservative prevention and management of prolapse. The review, first published in 2006, identified no existing prolapse prevention trials, informing her present research. One of the study's co-authors, Professor Don Wilson of Otago's Department of Women's and Children's Health, said pelvic floor muscle training is a unique form of treatment for pelvic floor dysfunction in women. "It has clear benefits with very few side effects, which is different from other interventions - surgery and drugs - used in medicine. It has been shown to be an effective treatment for urinary incontinence and some forms of symptomatic prolapse and now we have shown that these exercises can help prevent prolapse symptoms developing in the future. "I currently recommend all my patients to carry out regular pelvic floor muscle training."


Masood N.,Fatima Jinnah Women University | Qureshi M.Z.,GCU | Yasmin A.,Fatima Jinnah Women University
Cellular and Molecular Biology | Year: 2015

Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide with an alarming increase in Asian countries. Overwhelmingly increasing cell culture and preclinical studies are identifying wide ranging mechanisms which are instrumental in disease development, progression and resistance against different therapeutics. The scientists are unable to differentiate whether expressional mutation is a cause or a consequence of some other alterations occurring in the body. We partition this review into how NOTCH1 and p16 contribute in cancer development and how microRNAs quantitatively control NOTCH1 expression. Future studies must converge on identification of miRNAs which negatively regulate p16 and targeted inhibition of p16 targeting miRNAs will be helpful in inhibiting tumor growth, cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Detailed mechanistic insights related to miRNA mediated Notch regulation will also be useful in delivery of tumor suppressor miRNAs or mimics to effectively inhibit cancer. © 2015. All rights reserved.


Khokhar A.,G.C.U. | Siddique Z.,G.C.U.
Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering | Year: 2015

The Pb(II) and Fe(III) biosorption capacity of chemically treated leaves of Melia azedarach L. (MAL) was carried in batch mode. The optimum sequestration of these metal ions with NaOH and HCl treated MAL biosorbents was observed at 5-7 pH of solution, 0.09 g of adsorbent dose, 250 rpm shaking speed, 75 μm biosorbent sizes, 60 min of contact time and 5 mg L-1 initial metal ion concentration. Pseudo first order, pseudo second order, Elovich and intra particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. The high values of regression constant 0.99 revealed that sorption of Pb(II) and Fe(III) was best fitted by pseudo second order kinetic model. The equilibrium study was investigated by Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Florry-Huggins isotherms. The removal of Pb(II) and Fe(III) with NaOH and HCl treated MAL biosorbents was best described by the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum sorption capacity by NaOH treated biosorbent for Pb(II) and Fe(III) was 35.06 and 38.46 mg g-1, respectively and by HCl treated biosorbent for Pb(II) and Fe(III) was 28.5 and 28.57 mg g-1, respectively. Characterization of the treated MAL biosorbents was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. To check the efficiency of NaOH and HCl treated biosorbents, experiment was conducted on textile industrial effluents. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Kausar F.,GCU | Hayyat M.U.,GCU | Siddiq Z.,GCU | Mahmood R.,GCU
Pakistan Journal of Botany | Year: 2012

In the present study effects of different dilutions of municipal waste water were investigated on the physiological aspects of Eichornia crassipes Solms. There were five different concentrations of municipal waste water (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) which were labeled as T0, T1, T2, T3 and T4 respectively. Vegetative growth effected by the waste water was monitored at the end of the experiment. Vegetative reproduction of the plants was also studied by observing number of baby plants per plant. Rate of photosynthesis and rate of transpiration of the plants growing in different concentrations of municipal waste water were studied as physiological parameters. Before start of experiment and after harvesting the plants waste water samples were also analyzed. T4 showed highest rate of physiological parameters among all the treatments while T0 had the lowest rate of physiological parameters among all the treatments. These physiological activities were responsible for higher root shoot length in T4.


Butt G.,GCU | Hussain E.,GCU | Rehman A.,Rashid Latif Medical College
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences | Year: 2013

Aim: To evaluate wide ranging bioactive ingredients using in-vitro assays for a better understanding of the protein networks which are targeted by natural agents. Methods: Sargassum sp and Iyengaria sp were collected from southeast coast of Karachi. The powdered seaweed samples (500 g of Sargassum sp and Iyengaria sp) were extracted with methanol in conical flasks at room temperature for three weeks. The samples were filtered using Whatman filter paper to obtain clarified filtrates. ABTS radical scavenging assay and FRAP assays were used to analyze antioxidant potential. Results: The methanolic extract of Sargassum sp showed higher potential of antioxidant activity as evidenced by ABTS radical scavenging assay. Methanolic extract of Iyengaria sp show the highest FRAP value 26.5 mM, indicating to highest antioxidant potential as evidenced by FRAP assay. Conclusion: Identification of bioactive ingredients having considerable antioxidant potential will be helpful in better and deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms inhibited or activated by natural agents to suppress carcinogenesis.


Ghazala B.,GCU | Ejaz H.,GCU | Abdur R.,Rashid Latif Medical College
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences | Year: 2014

Aim: To analyse antioxidant potential of Sargassum sp and lyengaria sp by using ferrous ion chelating assay. Methods: Sargassum sp and Iyengaria sp were collected from southeast coast of Karachi. The powdered seaweed samples (500g of Sargassum sp and Iyengaria sp) were extracted with methanol in conical flasks at room temperature for three weeks. The samples were filtered using Whatman filter paper to obtain clarified filtrates. Ferrous ion-chelating assay was used for evaluation of antioxidant potential. Results: The methanolic extract of Sargassum sp showed higher potential as evidenced by Ferrous ion-chelating Assay. Conclusion: This is a preliminary study highlighting potential of Sargassum sp and future studies must converge on in-vitro analysis of these species for a better understanding of the biological mechanisms regulated by Sargassum sp to control cellular activities.

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