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News Article | May 28, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

In The Age Of Digital Medicine, The Humble Reflex Hammer Hangs On Receiving a diagnosis in 2017 — at least one made at a medical center outfitted with the latest clinical gadgetry — might include a scan that divides your body into a bread loaf of high-resolution digital slices. Your DNA might be fed through a gene sequencer that spits out your mortal code in a matter of hours. Even your smartphone might soon be used to uncover health problems. Yet nearly 130 years since its inception — after decades of science has mapped out our neuronal pathways — a simple knob of rubber with a metal handle remains one of medicine's most essential tools. I'm referring to the cheap, portable, easy-to-use reflex hammer. This unassuming device can be invaluable in diagnosing nervous and muscular disorders, and in determining whether a patient's pathology lies in the brain or elsewhere in the body. It can also help curtail healthcare spending by preventing unnecessary, often expensive testing. Yet like so many major medical and scientific discoveries, the reflex hammer has humble origins, in this case: the basement of a Viennese hotel. The inn was run by the father of Leopold Auenbrugger, an 18th century doctor who is considered to be among the founders of modern medicine. To gauge how much wine was left for customers, hotel employees would thump casks with their hands and listen for a dull thud or hollow tympany. Auenbrugger realized that the same technique — now called "percussing" — could be applied to the human torso to, say, determine how much fluid had built up around a diseased heart. He wrote as much in his 1761 paper New invention to detect diseases hidden deep within the chest. Thought to be more accurate than the human hand, it wasn't long before percussion hammers were being designed to more precisely diagnose disease. Competition ensued. Scottish physician Sir David Barry's model, released in the 1820s, was the first. German doctor Max A. Wintrich's came shortly after and was more popular, but was not without its critics: "[Wintrich's hammer] is inconvenient to hold, it is rigid ... it required education to use it, and even then it does not fulfill its purposes," a rival inventor commented. As neurologist Dr. Douglas J. Lanksa wrote in a 1989 paper on the many types of reflex hammers, "Some were T-shaped or L-shaped, others resembled battle axes, tomahawks, or even magic wands." He adds that no material was off limits: wood, ebony, whale bone, brass, lead, even "velvet-covered worsted" (a type of yarn). As percussion hammer warfare waged on, doctors and scientists were also beginning to understand the concept of reflexes, or involuntary, near-immediate responses to stimuli that occur before any sensory information reaches the brain. Muscular jerks. Blinking. Sneezing. Gagging. All of these are automatic feedback loops between sensory and motor neurons that help us navigate our environment and protect us from danger. In 1875, German neurologists Drs. Heinrich Erb and Carl Friedrich Otto Westphal were among the first to realize that eliciting a reflex by briskly tapping the tendons of major muscles might be useful. They felt the knee jerk — or "patellar-tendon" reflex — in particular could help assess nerve function. Hammers specifically suited to test reflexes were soon developed, the first of which had the now classic shape we're accustomed to — a thin metal handle with a triangular rubber head. Designed by American physician John Madison Taylor in Philadelphia in 1888 — and modified ever since by many — the simple device was heavy enough to elicit reflexes, and had round edges to ease impact. An entry level model runs just $2.25 on Amazon. The Krauss hammer, developed by German-American physician William Christopher Krauss, was designed around the same time. It had two rounded heads: a large one for knees and a smaller one for biceps. Dr. Ernst L.O. Trömner's did too, but it also tapered to a thin end to assess skin reflexes. There were also the Queen Square hammer, the Babinski hammer, the Buck hammer and the Berliner hammer. The Stookey hammer flaunted a camel hair brush to get a better sense of touch sensation. The list goes on. Daniella C. Sisniega is a third year medical student at the Boston University School of Medicine. Last month at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting, she presented a poster explicating the reflex hammer's past. "I'm fascinated by how the reflex hammer started out as a percussion hammer, but was [then] adapted to elicit reflexes and has been in every neurologist's tool box ever since," she told NPR. "I also did not know that the little rubber triangle was the first reflex hammer. I feel like I owe it an apology!" Sisniega jokes about the lackluster quality of the inexpensive Taylors. "The little tomahawk is included in the kit everyone receives when they enter medical school," she recalls. "The rubber is cheap and very light, while the other hammers are heavier on the head so that you can use the 'swing' of the hammer as opposed to the strength of the strike to test the reflex." While attending the AAN conference myself, I asked multiple sclerosis expert Dr. Stephen Krieger about the role of the reflex hammer in modern medical diagnosis. "We could argue about the nuances of the hammer — the Queens Square, the Tomahawk, plastic handle, metal handle, weighted, flexible or rigid — but the hammer itself is always in the hand. Reflexes tell the story of neurologic diseases of all sorts," he says. Krieger explains how disorders of the brain, like a stroke or brain tumor, result in hyperactive reflexes, while conditions affecting muscles and peripheral nerves usually result in reduced or non-existent reflexes. Reduced reflexes are, for example, a common symptom of back pain due to degenerative disk disease. Dr. Andrew Wilner, an assistant professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic, recounted the story of one of his patients, who had back pain, weakness and numbness of the legs. Wilner was leaning toward a diagnosis of either Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) — an autoimmune disorder of peripheral nerves — or a myelopathy, an injury of some kind to the spinal cord. Both conditions can lead to medical emergencies, but each requires drastically different treatment. "The reflex hammer was arguably our most important tool in narrowing down the differential diagnosis," he says. "Had we found diminished or absent deep tendon reflexes, GBS would have been more likely. As it turned out, the patient had brisk pathological knee jerks, pointing to a lesion in the brain or spinal cord." Based on these findings, Wilner ordered an imaging study of the patient's spinal cord, where a lesion was found — as opposed to pursuing the costly tests involved in a GBS diagnosis. Wilner feels that the simple art of interviewing and examining a patient can get overshadowed by the myriad new diagnostic technologies. When it comes to clinical tools, he feels, sometimes basic is better. "Technology is glorious," admits Krieger, "and [it] will teach us things about patients that we could never have known or imagined. But the simple, elegant, inexpensive almost plebeian swing of the reflex hammer has a cost/benefit ratio that I think no advanced technology will likely ever match." Bret Stetka is a writer based in New York and an editorial director at Medscape. His work has appeared in Wired and Scientific American, and on The Atlantic.com. He graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine in 2005. He's also on Twitter: @BretStetka


News Article | May 28, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

In The Age Of Digital Medicine, The Humble Reflex Hammer Hangs On Receiving a diagnosis in 2017 — at least one made at a medical center outfitted with the latest clinical gadgetry — might include a scan that divides your body into a bread loaf of high-resolution digital slices. Your DNA might be fed through a gene sequencer that spits out your mortal code in a matter of hours. Even your smartphone might soon be used to uncover health problems. Yet nearly 130 years since its inception — after decades of science has mapped out our neuronal pathways — a simple knob of rubber with a metal handle remains one of medicine's most essential tools. I'm referring to the cheap, portable, easy-to-use reflex hammer. This unassuming device can be invaluable in diagnosing nervous and muscular disorders, and in determining whether a patient's pathology lies in the brain or elsewhere in the body. It can also help curtail healthcare spending by preventing unnecessary, often expensive testing. Yet like so many major medical and scientific discoveries, the reflex hammer has humble origins, in this case: the basement of a Viennese hotel. The inn was run by the father of Leopold Auenbrugger, an 18th century doctor who is considered to be among the founders of modern medicine. To gauge how much wine was left for customers, hotel employees would thump casks with their hands and listen for a dull thud or hollow tympany. Auenbrugger realized that the same technique — now called "percussing" — could be applied to the human torso to, say, determine how much fluid had built up around a diseased heart. He wrote as much in his 1761 paper New invention to detect diseases hidden deep within the chest. Thought to be more accurate than the human hand, it wasn't long before percussion hammers were being designed to more precisely diagnose disease. Competition ensued. Scottish physician Sir David Barry's model, released in the 1820s, was the first. German doctor Max A. Wintrich's came shortly after and was more popular, but was not without its critics: "[Wintrich's hammer] is inconvenient to hold, it is rigid ... it required education to use it, and even then it does not fulfill its purposes," a rival inventor commented. As neurologist Dr. Douglas J. Lanksa wrote in a 1989 paper on the many types of reflex hammers, "Some were T-shaped or L-shaped, others resembled battle axes, tomahawks, or even magic wands." He adds that no material was off limits: wood, ebony, whale bone, brass, lead, even "velvet-covered worsted" (a type of yarn). As percussion hammer warfare waged on, doctors and scientists were also beginning to understand the concept of reflexes, or involuntary, near-immediate responses to stimuli that occur before any sensory information reaches the brain. Muscular jerks. Blinking. Sneezing. Gagging. All of these are automatic feedback loops between sensory and motor neurons that help us navigate our environment and protect us from danger. In 1875, German neurologists Drs. Heinrich Erb and Carl Friedrich Otto Westphal were among the first to realize that eliciting a reflex by briskly tapping the tendons of major muscles might be useful. They felt the knee jerk — or "patellar-tendon" reflex — in particular could help assess nerve function. Hammers specifically suited to test reflexes were soon developed, the first of which had the now classic shape we're accustomed to — a thin metal handle with a triangular rubber head. Designed by American physician John Madison Taylor in Philadelphia in 1888 — and modified ever since by many — the simple device was heavy enough to elicit reflexes, and had round edges to ease impact. An entry level model runs just $2.25 on Amazon. The Krauss hammer, developed by German-American physician William Christopher Krauss, was designed around the same time. It had two rounded heads: a large one for knees and a smaller one for biceps. Dr. Ernst L.O. Trömner's did too, but it also tapered to a thin end to assess skin reflexes. There were also the Queen Square hammer, the Babinski hammer, the Buck hammer and the Berliner hammer. The Stookey hammer flaunted a camel hair brush to get a better sense of touch sensation. The list goes on. Daniella C. Sisniega is a third year medical student at the Boston University School of Medicine. Last month at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting, she presented a poster explicating the reflex hammer's past. "I'm fascinated by how the reflex hammer started out as a percussion hammer, but was [then] adapted to elicit reflexes and has been in every neurologist's tool box ever since," she told NPR. "I also did not know that the little rubber triangle was the first reflex hammer. I feel like I owe it an apology!" Sisniega jokes about the lackluster quality of the inexpensive Taylors. "The little tomahawk is included in the kit everyone receives when they enter medical school," she recalls. "The rubber is cheap and very light, while the other hammers are heavier on the head so that you can use the 'swing' of the hammer as opposed to the strength of the strike to test the reflex." While attending the AAN conference myself, I asked multiple sclerosis expert Dr. Stephen Krieger about the role of the reflex hammer in modern medical diagnosis. "We could argue about the nuances of the hammer — the Queens Square, the Tomahawk, plastic handle, metal handle, weighted, flexible or rigid — but the hammer itself is always in the hand. Reflexes tell the story of neurologic diseases of all sorts," he says. Krieger explains how disorders of the brain, like a stroke or brain tumor, result in hyperactive reflexes, while conditions affecting muscles and peripheral nerves usually result in reduced or non-existent reflexes. Reduced reflexes are, for example, a common symptom of back pain due to degenerative disk disease. Dr. Andrew Wilner, an assistant professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic, recounted the story of one of his patients, who had back pain, weakness and numbness of the legs. Wilner was leaning toward a diagnosis of either Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) — an autoimmune disorder of peripheral nerves — or a myelopathy, an injury of some kind to the spinal cord. Both conditions can lead to medical emergencies, but each requires drastically different treatment. "The reflex hammer was arguably our most important tool in narrowing down the differential diagnosis," he says. "Had we found diminished or absent deep tendon reflexes, GBS would have been more likely. As it turned out, the patient had brisk pathological knee jerks, pointing to a lesion in the brain or spinal cord." Based on these findings, Wilner ordered an imaging study of the patient's spinal cord, where a lesion was found — as opposed to pursuing the costly tests involved in a GBS diagnosis. Wilner feels that the simple art of interviewing and examining a patient can get overshadowed by the myriad new diagnostic technologies. When it comes to clinical tools, he feels, sometimes basic is better. "Technology is glorious," admits Krieger, "and [it] will teach us things about patients that we could never have known or imagined. But the simple, elegant, inexpensive almost plebeian swing of the reflex hammer has a cost/benefit ratio that I think no advanced technology will likely ever match." Bret Stetka is a writer based in New York and an editorial director at Medscape. His work has appeared in Wired and Scientific American, and on The Atlantic.com. He graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine in 2005. He's also on Twitter: @BretStetka


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SALT LAKE CITY, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Basin Scientific, Inc. (OTCQB:GBSN), a molecular diagnostics company, today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued U.S. Patent 9,657,353 for the Company’s amplification suppressor. This patent is the second U.S. patent relating to Great Basin’s amplification suppressor technology, expanding the Company’s protection to assays, kits, and products. The protection afforded by this patent allows the Company to explore licensing of the technology to applications such as medical research, food safety, veterinary, and more. “Environmental contamination by Staphylococcus species or any other bacteria environmental contaminant of clinical samples—producing false positive results—is a problem that has stymied the molecular diagnostics industry since its beginning, which was the impetus for our development of this technology,” said Robert D. Jenison, chief technology officer of Great Basin Scientific. “We believe our amplification suppressor is an important scientific advancement in its ability to fully suppress non-life-threatening environmental contaminants from a clinical sample. This important technology enables us to seek licensing opportunities with molecular diagnostics companies that operate outside of our market niche, and aligns with our growth strategy to broaden our revenue stream.” The technology, currently utilized in the Company’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, distinguishes between Staphylococcus species present in a clinical sample from a Staphylococcus contamination that is introduced during the sample collection or testing process. While not negatively impacting the appropriate clinical assay limit of detection, Great Basin’s technology completely blocks detection of contaminants present in the environment that may lead to a false positive result and potential misdiagnosis of a patient.  A study, which was led by Jenison and published in the April issue of PLOS ONE, showed that the Company’s amplification suppressor completely blocked environmental contaminants in a clinical sample that were detected at rates as high as 40%. The full study can be accessed here. The new patent protects Staphylococcus-based products, including nasal swabs and pre-surgical screens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screens. Great Basin’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel is the Company’s first commercial embodiment of the patented amplification suppressor technology. In addition to being used in its Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, the amplification suppressor technology is being utilized in the Company’s in-development SA Nasal Screen Test, and is expected to be used in future tests and panels. With this patent, Great Basin has eight U.S. patents issued, with 11 additional patents pending. Great Basin’s molecular diagnostics system offers low-, mid-plex and multiplex testing, with commercial assays available for the detection of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Group B Streptococcus (GBS), Toxigenic Clostridium difficile (C. diff), Bordetella pertussis, and a Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel (SIDR) for identifying bloodstream infections caused by MRSA and other Staphylococcus species. Additionally, the Company is awaiting 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) on a Stool Bacterial Pathogens Panel. Other tests in development include a direct-from-blood Candida Blood Infections Panel, a CT/NG/TV Test, and a Nasal S. aureus Pre-surgical Screen Test. Great Basin Scientific is a molecular diagnostics company that commercializes breakthrough chip-based technologies. The Company is dedicated to the development of simple, yet powerful, sample-to-result technology and products that provide fast, multiple-pathogen diagnoses of infectious diseases. The Company's vision is to make molecular diagnostic testing so simple and cost-effective that every patient will be tested for every serious infection, reducing misdiagnoses and significantly limiting the spread of infectious disease. More information can be found on the Company's website at www.gbscience.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements regarding events, trends and business prospects, which may affect our future operating results and financial position, including but not limited to statements regarding our ability to license our technology, the ability to add revenue from such license arrangements and our ability to expand the use of our amplification suppressor technology in future tests and panels. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially, and reported results should not be considered as an indication of future performance. These risk and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: (i) our limited operating history and history of losses; (ii) our ability to develop and commercialize new products and the timing of commercialization; (iii) our ability to obtain capital when needed; and (iv) other risks set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the risks set forth in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 and in the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended March 31, 2017. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof, and Great Basin Scientific specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SALT LAKE CITY, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Basin Scientific, Inc. (OTCQB:GBSN), a molecular diagnostics company, today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued U.S. Patent 9,657,353 for the Company’s amplification suppressor. This patent is the second U.S. patent relating to Great Basin’s amplification suppressor technology, expanding the Company’s protection to assays, kits, and products. The protection afforded by this patent allows the Company to explore licensing of the technology to applications such as medical research, food safety, veterinary, and more. “Environmental contamination by Staphylococcus species or any other bacteria environmental contaminant of clinical samples—producing false positive results—is a problem that has stymied the molecular diagnostics industry since its beginning, which was the impetus for our development of this technology,” said Robert D. Jenison, chief technology officer of Great Basin Scientific. “We believe our amplification suppressor is an important scientific advancement in its ability to fully suppress non-life-threatening environmental contaminants from a clinical sample. This important technology enables us to seek licensing opportunities with molecular diagnostics companies that operate outside of our market niche, and aligns with our growth strategy to broaden our revenue stream.” The technology, currently utilized in the Company’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, distinguishes between Staphylococcus species present in a clinical sample from a Staphylococcus contamination that is introduced during the sample collection or testing process. While not negatively impacting the appropriate clinical assay limit of detection, Great Basin’s technology completely blocks detection of contaminants present in the environment that may lead to a false positive result and potential misdiagnosis of a patient.  A study, which was led by Jenison and published in the April issue of PLOS ONE, showed that the Company’s amplification suppressor completely blocked environmental contaminants in a clinical sample that were detected at rates as high as 40%. The full study can be accessed here. The new patent protects Staphylococcus-based products, including nasal swabs and pre-surgical screens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screens. Great Basin’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel is the Company’s first commercial embodiment of the patented amplification suppressor technology. In addition to being used in its Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, the amplification suppressor technology is being utilized in the Company’s in-development SA Nasal Screen Test, and is expected to be used in future tests and panels. With this patent, Great Basin has eight U.S. patents issued, with 11 additional patents pending. Great Basin’s molecular diagnostics system offers low-, mid-plex and multiplex testing, with commercial assays available for the detection of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Group B Streptococcus (GBS), Toxigenic Clostridium difficile (C. diff), Bordetella pertussis, and a Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel (SIDR) for identifying bloodstream infections caused by MRSA and other Staphylococcus species. Additionally, the Company is awaiting 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) on a Stool Bacterial Pathogens Panel. Other tests in development include a direct-from-blood Candida Blood Infections Panel, a CT/NG/TV Test, and a Nasal S. aureus Pre-surgical Screen Test. Great Basin Scientific is a molecular diagnostics company that commercializes breakthrough chip-based technologies. The Company is dedicated to the development of simple, yet powerful, sample-to-result technology and products that provide fast, multiple-pathogen diagnoses of infectious diseases. The Company's vision is to make molecular diagnostic testing so simple and cost-effective that every patient will be tested for every serious infection, reducing misdiagnoses and significantly limiting the spread of infectious disease. More information can be found on the Company's website at www.gbscience.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements regarding events, trends and business prospects, which may affect our future operating results and financial position, including but not limited to statements regarding our ability to license our technology, the ability to add revenue from such license arrangements and our ability to expand the use of our amplification suppressor technology in future tests and panels. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially, and reported results should not be considered as an indication of future performance. These risk and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: (i) our limited operating history and history of losses; (ii) our ability to develop and commercialize new products and the timing of commercialization; (iii) our ability to obtain capital when needed; and (iv) other risks set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the risks set forth in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 and in the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended March 31, 2017. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof, and Great Basin Scientific specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SALT LAKE CITY, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Basin Scientific, Inc. (OTCQB:GBSN), a molecular diagnostics company, today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued U.S. Patent 9,657,353 for the Company’s amplification suppressor. This patent is the second U.S. patent relating to Great Basin’s amplification suppressor technology, expanding the Company’s protection to assays, kits, and products. The protection afforded by this patent allows the Company to explore licensing of the technology to applications such as medical research, food safety, veterinary, and more. “Environmental contamination by Staphylococcus species or any other bacteria environmental contaminant of clinical samples—producing false positive results—is a problem that has stymied the molecular diagnostics industry since its beginning, which was the impetus for our development of this technology,” said Robert D. Jenison, chief technology officer of Great Basin Scientific. “We believe our amplification suppressor is an important scientific advancement in its ability to fully suppress non-life-threatening environmental contaminants from a clinical sample. This important technology enables us to seek licensing opportunities with molecular diagnostics companies that operate outside of our market niche, and aligns with our growth strategy to broaden our revenue stream.” The technology, currently utilized in the Company’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, distinguishes between Staphylococcus species present in a clinical sample from a Staphylococcus contamination that is introduced during the sample collection or testing process. While not negatively impacting the appropriate clinical assay limit of detection, Great Basin’s technology completely blocks detection of contaminants present in the environment that may lead to a false positive result and potential misdiagnosis of a patient.  A study, which was led by Jenison and published in the April issue of PLOS ONE, showed that the Company’s amplification suppressor completely blocked environmental contaminants in a clinical sample that were detected at rates as high as 40%. The full study can be accessed here. The new patent protects Staphylococcus-based products, including nasal swabs and pre-surgical screens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screens. Great Basin’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel is the Company’s first commercial embodiment of the patented amplification suppressor technology. In addition to being used in its Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, the amplification suppressor technology is being utilized in the Company’s in-development SA Nasal Screen Test, and is expected to be used in future tests and panels. With this patent, Great Basin has eight U.S. patents issued, with 11 additional patents pending. Great Basin’s molecular diagnostics system offers low-, mid-plex and multiplex testing, with commercial assays available for the detection of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Group B Streptococcus (GBS), Toxigenic Clostridium difficile (C. diff), Bordetella pertussis, and a Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel (SIDR) for identifying bloodstream infections caused by MRSA and other Staphylococcus species. Additionally, the Company is awaiting 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) on a Stool Bacterial Pathogens Panel. Other tests in development include a direct-from-blood Candida Blood Infections Panel, a CT/NG/TV Test, and a Nasal S. aureus Pre-surgical Screen Test. Great Basin Scientific is a molecular diagnostics company that commercializes breakthrough chip-based technologies. The Company is dedicated to the development of simple, yet powerful, sample-to-result technology and products that provide fast, multiple-pathogen diagnoses of infectious diseases. The Company's vision is to make molecular diagnostic testing so simple and cost-effective that every patient will be tested for every serious infection, reducing misdiagnoses and significantly limiting the spread of infectious disease. More information can be found on the Company's website at www.gbscience.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements regarding events, trends and business prospects, which may affect our future operating results and financial position, including but not limited to statements regarding our ability to license our technology, the ability to add revenue from such license arrangements and our ability to expand the use of our amplification suppressor technology in future tests and panels. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially, and reported results should not be considered as an indication of future performance. These risk and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: (i) our limited operating history and history of losses; (ii) our ability to develop and commercialize new products and the timing of commercialization; (iii) our ability to obtain capital when needed; and (iv) other risks set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the risks set forth in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 and in the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended March 31, 2017. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof, and Great Basin Scientific specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.


TYSONS, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--DXC Technology Company (NYSE: DXC) today reported results on behalf of Computer Sciences Corporation ("CSC") for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2017. “In fiscal 2017, CSC took major steps toward our goal of establishing a leadership position in digital transformation,” said Mike Lawrie, chairman, president and CEO. “Beyond successfully bringing together CSC and the Enterprise Services business of Hewlett Packard Enterprise into DXC Technology, we maintained significant next-gen offerings and Business Process Services momentum, and established key strategic partnerships. As we invested into digital and IP, we delivered revenue growth and margin expansion, as well as earnings and free cash flow growth in fiscal 2017, and have positioned DXC Technology to deliver margin expansion in fiscal 2018.” GBS revenues of $1,043 million in the quarter compares with $941 million in the year ago quarter, an increase of 10.8%. GBS revenues increased 14.2% year-over-year in constant currency to $1,075 million. GBS revenues growth was driven by the contributions of our recent acquisitions, as well as momentum in our business process services offerings. GBS consolidated segment operating margin in the quarter, excluding the impact of certain items, was 13.8% up from 11.1% in the prior year. New business awards for GBS were $1.1 billion in the fourth quarter. GIS revenues of $846 million in the quarter compares with $866 million in the year ago quarter, a decrease of 2.3%. GIS revenues increased 0.2% year-over-year in constant currency to $868 million. The GIS revenues increase was driven by the contributions of our recent acquisitions and the growth in our next generation offerings. GIS consolidated segment operating margin in the quarter, excluding the impact of certain items, was 12.3% up from 6.0% in the prior year, reflecting a shift in mix toward cloud-based software solutions. New business awards for GIS were $1.0 billion in the fourth quarter. During the fourth quarter, CSC returned $20 million to shareholders in the form of common stock dividends. As previously disclosed, effective April 1, 2017, CSC became a wholly owned subsidiary of DXC Technology Company, an independent public company formed in connection with the spin-off and combination with CSC of the Enterprise Services business of the Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company ("HPES"). CSC common stock was suspended from trading on the NYSE effective as of the opening of trading on April 3, 2017. CSC filed a Form 15 with the SEC on April 18, 2017 to deregister the shares of CSC common stock. DXC common stock began regular-way trading under the symbol “DXC” on the New York Stock Exchange on April 3, 2017. This press release is the earnings release of CSC, and the financial information set forth herein relates only to CSC and its subsidiaries, as of and for the two years ended March 31, 2017 and as of and for the three-month periods ended March 31, 2017 and April 1, 2016, which predate the April 1, 2017 effective date of the previously disclosed merger transaction involving CSC. This press release does not include the financial results of HPES for any periods. Accordingly, unless the context otherwise requires, references herein to “CSC,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” or “our” refer only to CSC and its pre-combination subsidiaries and not to DXC, HPES or their pre-combination subsidiaries. Beginning with the first quarter press release for the quarter ending June 30, 2017, DXC will report on a consolidated basis representing the combined operations of CSC and HPES and their respective subsidiaries. Because CSC is deemed the acquirer in this combination for accounting purposes under U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), CSC is considered DXC's predecessor, and the historical financial statements of CSC prior to April 1, 2017 will be reflected in DXC's future quarterly and annual reports as DXC's historical financial statements. DXC senior management will host a conference call and webcast to discuss these results today at 5 p.m. EDT. The dial-in number for domestic callers is 888-428-9480. Callers who reside outside of the United States or Canada should dial +1-719-457-2621. The passcode for all participants is 9327678. The webcast audio and any presentation slides will be available on DXC’s Investor Relations website. A replay of the conference call will be available from approximately two hours after the conclusion of the call until June 1, 2017. The replay dial-in number is 888-203-1112 for domestic callers and +1-719-457-0820 for callers who reside outside of the United States and Canada. The replay passcode is also 9327678. A replay of this webcast will also be available on DXC’s Investor Relations website. In an effort to provide investors with supplemental financial information, in addition to the preliminary and unaudited financial information presented on a GAAP basis, we have also disclosed in this press release preliminary non-GAAP information including: constant currency, consolidated segment operating income and margin, consolidated segment adjusted operating income and margin, consolidated segment commercial operating income and margin, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) and margin, adjusted EBIT and margin, non-GAAP income from continuing operations before taxes, non-GAAP net income from continuing operations, non-GAAP EPS from continuing operations and adjusted free cash flow. Reconciliations of the preliminary non-GAAP measures to the respective most directly comparable GAAP measures, as well as the rationale for management’s use of non-GAAP measures, are included below. DXC Technology Company ("DXC" or "DXC Technology") is the world’s leading independent, end-to-end IT services company, helping clients harness the power of innovation to thrive on change. Created by the merger of CSC and the Enterprise Services business of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, DXC serves nearly 6,000 private and public sector clients across 70 countries. The company’s technology independence, global talent and extensive partner network combine to deliver powerful next-generation IT services and solutions. DXC is recognized among the best corporate citizens globally. For more information, visit DXC's website at www.dxc.technology. All statements in this press release that do not directly and exclusively relate to historical facts constitute “forward-looking statements.” These statements represent current expectations and beliefs, and no assurance can be given that the results described in such statements will be achieved. Such statements are subject to numerous assumptions, risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in such statements, many of which are outside of our control. For a written description of these factors, see the section titled “Risk Factors” in CSC’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended April 1, 2016 and DXC's (formerly named Everett SpinCo, Inc.) Form S-4 filed on February 24, 2017 and any updating information in subsequent SEC filings. No assurance can be given that any goal or plan set forth in any forward-looking statement can or will be achieved, and readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such statements which speak only as of the date they are made. We do not undertake any obligation to update or release any revisions to any forward-looking statement or to report any events or circumstances after the date of this press release or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events except as required by law. We present non-GAAP financial measures of performance which are derived from the consolidated financial information of CSC. These non-GAAP financial measures include constant currency, consolidated segment operating income and margin, consolidated segment adjusted operating income and margin, consolidated segment commercial operating income and margin, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) and margin, adjusted EBIT and margin, non-GAAP income from continuing operations before taxes, non-GAAP net income from continuing operations, non-GAAP EPS from continuing operations and adjusted free cash flow. We present these non-GAAP financial measures to provide investors with meaningful supplemental financial information, in addition to the financial information presented on a U.S. GAAP basis. Non-GAAP financial measures exclude certain items otherwise required by U.S. GAAP which management believes are not indicative of core operating performance. We believe these non-GAAP measures allow investors to better understand the financial performance of CSC exclusive of the impacts of corporate wide strategic decisions. We believe that adjusting for these items provides investors with additional measures to evaluate the financial performance of our core business operations on a comparable basis from period to period. We believe the non-GAAP measures provided are also considered important measures by financial analysts covering CSC as equity research analysts publish estimates and research notes based on our non-GAAP commentary, including our guidance around non-GAAP EPS. There are limitations to the use of the non-GAAP financial measures we present. One of the limitations is that they do not reflect complete financial results. We compensate for this limitation by providing a reconciliation between our non-GAAP financial measures and the respective most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP. Additionally, other companies, including companies in CSC's industry, may calculate non-GAAP financial measures differently than we do, limiting the usefulness of those measures for comparative purposes between companies. Consolidated segment operating income and consolidated segment adjusted operating income are useful measures in evaluating the financial performance of CSC's core segment business operations on a more comparable basis year-over-year. However, these measures could limit one’s ability to assess CSC's financial performance by excluding corporate G&A and certain other items. To compensate for this limitation, we provide a reconciliation between these measures and income from continuing operations, before taxes, which is the most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with U.S. GAAP. We define consolidated segment operating income as revenues less costs of services, associated depreciation and amortization expense, restructuring costs, and segment SG&A expenses. Consolidated segment operating income excludes pension and OPEB actuarial and settlement losses and corporate G&A, which is largely associated with centrally managed overhead and shared-services functions which are not controlled by segment level leadership nor directly related to CSC's core segment business operations. Consolidated segment adjusted operating income further excludes the impacts of corporate wide strategic decisions, such as segment related restructuring and other transaction costs. We define consolidated segment operating margin and consolidated segment adjusted operating margin as consolidated segment operating income and consolidated segment adjusted operating income as a percentage of revenues. A reconciliation of consolidated segment operating income and consolidated segment adjusted operating income to income from continuing operations, before taxes is as follows:


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SALT LAKE CITY, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Basin Scientific, Inc. (OTCQB:GBSN), a molecular diagnostics company, today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued U.S. Patent 9,657,353 for the Company’s amplification suppressor. This patent is the second U.S. patent relating to Great Basin’s amplification suppressor technology, expanding the Company’s protection to assays, kits, and products. The protection afforded by this patent allows the Company to explore licensing of the technology to applications such as medical research, food safety, veterinary, and more. “Environmental contamination by Staphylococcus species or any other bacteria environmental contaminant of clinical samples—producing false positive results—is a problem that has stymied the molecular diagnostics industry since its beginning, which was the impetus for our development of this technology,” said Robert D. Jenison, chief technology officer of Great Basin Scientific. “We believe our amplification suppressor is an important scientific advancement in its ability to fully suppress non-life-threatening environmental contaminants from a clinical sample. This important technology enables us to seek licensing opportunities with molecular diagnostics companies that operate outside of our market niche, and aligns with our growth strategy to broaden our revenue stream.” The technology, currently utilized in the Company’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, distinguishes between Staphylococcus species present in a clinical sample from a Staphylococcus contamination that is introduced during the sample collection or testing process. While not negatively impacting the appropriate clinical assay limit of detection, Great Basin’s technology completely blocks detection of contaminants present in the environment that may lead to a false positive result and potential misdiagnosis of a patient.  A study, which was led by Jenison and published in the April issue of PLOS ONE, showed that the Company’s amplification suppressor completely blocked environmental contaminants in a clinical sample that were detected at rates as high as 40%. The full study can be accessed here. The new patent protects Staphylococcus-based products, including nasal swabs and pre-surgical screens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screens. Great Basin’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel is the Company’s first commercial embodiment of the patented amplification suppressor technology. In addition to being used in its Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, the amplification suppressor technology is being utilized in the Company’s in-development SA Nasal Screen Test, and is expected to be used in future tests and panels. With this patent, Great Basin has eight U.S. patents issued, with 11 additional patents pending. Great Basin’s molecular diagnostics system offers low-, mid-plex and multiplex testing, with commercial assays available for the detection of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Group B Streptococcus (GBS), Toxigenic Clostridium difficile (C. diff), Bordetella pertussis, and a Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel (SIDR) for identifying bloodstream infections caused by MRSA and other Staphylococcus species. Additionally, the Company is awaiting 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) on a Stool Bacterial Pathogens Panel. Other tests in development include a direct-from-blood Candida Blood Infections Panel, a CT/NG/TV Test, and a Nasal S. aureus Pre-surgical Screen Test. Great Basin Scientific is a molecular diagnostics company that commercializes breakthrough chip-based technologies. The Company is dedicated to the development of simple, yet powerful, sample-to-result technology and products that provide fast, multiple-pathogen diagnoses of infectious diseases. The Company's vision is to make molecular diagnostic testing so simple and cost-effective that every patient will be tested for every serious infection, reducing misdiagnoses and significantly limiting the spread of infectious disease. More information can be found on the Company's website at www.gbscience.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements regarding events, trends and business prospects, which may affect our future operating results and financial position, including but not limited to statements regarding our ability to license our technology, the ability to add revenue from such license arrangements and our ability to expand the use of our amplification suppressor technology in future tests and panels. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially, and reported results should not be considered as an indication of future performance. These risk and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: (i) our limited operating history and history of losses; (ii) our ability to develop and commercialize new products and the timing of commercialization; (iii) our ability to obtain capital when needed; and (iv) other risks set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the risks set forth in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 and in the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended March 31, 2017. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof, and Great Basin Scientific specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

SALT LAKE CITY, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Basin Scientific, Inc. (OTCQB:GBSN), a molecular diagnostics company, today announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued U.S. Patent 9,657,353 for the Company’s amplification suppressor. This patent is the second U.S. patent relating to Great Basin’s amplification suppressor technology, expanding the Company’s protection to assays, kits, and products. The protection afforded by this patent allows the Company to explore licensing of the technology to applications such as medical research, food safety, veterinary, and more. “Environmental contamination by Staphylococcus species or any other bacteria environmental contaminant of clinical samples—producing false positive results—is a problem that has stymied the molecular diagnostics industry since its beginning, which was the impetus for our development of this technology,” said Robert D. Jenison, chief technology officer of Great Basin Scientific. “We believe our amplification suppressor is an important scientific advancement in its ability to fully suppress non-life-threatening environmental contaminants from a clinical sample. This important technology enables us to seek licensing opportunities with molecular diagnostics companies that operate outside of our market niche, and aligns with our growth strategy to broaden our revenue stream.” The technology, currently utilized in the Company’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, distinguishes between Staphylococcus species present in a clinical sample from a Staphylococcus contamination that is introduced during the sample collection or testing process. While not negatively impacting the appropriate clinical assay limit of detection, Great Basin’s technology completely blocks detection of contaminants present in the environment that may lead to a false positive result and potential misdiagnosis of a patient.  A study, which was led by Jenison and published in the April issue of PLOS ONE, showed that the Company’s amplification suppressor completely blocked environmental contaminants in a clinical sample that were detected at rates as high as 40%. The full study can be accessed here. The new patent protects Staphylococcus-based products, including nasal swabs and pre-surgical screens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screens. Great Basin’s Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel is the Company’s first commercial embodiment of the patented amplification suppressor technology. In addition to being used in its Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel, the amplification suppressor technology is being utilized in the Company’s in-development SA Nasal Screen Test, and is expected to be used in future tests and panels. With this patent, Great Basin has eight U.S. patents issued, with 11 additional patents pending. Great Basin’s molecular diagnostics system offers low-, mid-plex and multiplex testing, with commercial assays available for the detection of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Group B Streptococcus (GBS), Toxigenic Clostridium difficile (C. diff), Bordetella pertussis, and a Staph ID/R Blood Culture Panel (SIDR) for identifying bloodstream infections caused by MRSA and other Staphylococcus species. Additionally, the Company is awaiting 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) on a Stool Bacterial Pathogens Panel. Other tests in development include a direct-from-blood Candida Blood Infections Panel, a CT/NG/TV Test, and a Nasal S. aureus Pre-surgical Screen Test. Great Basin Scientific is a molecular diagnostics company that commercializes breakthrough chip-based technologies. The Company is dedicated to the development of simple, yet powerful, sample-to-result technology and products that provide fast, multiple-pathogen diagnoses of infectious diseases. The Company's vision is to make molecular diagnostic testing so simple and cost-effective that every patient will be tested for every serious infection, reducing misdiagnoses and significantly limiting the spread of infectious disease. More information can be found on the Company's website at www.gbscience.com. This press release includes forward-looking statements regarding events, trends and business prospects, which may affect our future operating results and financial position, including but not limited to statements regarding our ability to license our technology, the ability to add revenue from such license arrangements and our ability to expand the use of our amplification suppressor technology in future tests and panels. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially, and reported results should not be considered as an indication of future performance. These risk and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: (i) our limited operating history and history of losses; (ii) our ability to develop and commercialize new products and the timing of commercialization; (iii) our ability to obtain capital when needed; and (iv) other risks set forth in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the risks set forth in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 and in the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended March 31, 2017. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof, and Great Basin Scientific specifically disclaims any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as required by law.


CHICAGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--USG Corporation (NYSE: USG) (“USG”) today announced the early results of the previously announced cash tender offer (the “Tender Offer”) for any and all of its outstanding 7.75% Senior Notes due 2018 (the “Notes”). The Tender Offer is being made on the terms and subject to the conditions set forth in the Offer to Purchase dated May 1, 2017 (the “Offer to Purchase”) and the related Letter of Transmittal (the “Letter of Transmittal”). The Tender Offer is scheduled to expire at 11:59 p.m., New York City time, on May 26, 2017, unless extended or earlier terminated as described in the Offer to Purchase (such time and date, as the same may be extended, the “Expiration Time”). As of 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on May 12, 2017 (the “Early Tender Time”), according to Global Bondholder Services Corporation (“GBS”), the Depositary and Information Agent in connection with the Tender Offer, tenders were received from holders of Notes and not validly withdrawn as outlined in the following table: Subject to the terms and conditions of the Tender Offer, holders of Notes who validly tendered and did not withdraw their Notes at or prior to the Early Tender Time will be entitled to receive $1,044.30 per $1,000 principal amount of Notes tendered, which includes the early tender premium of $30.00 per $1,000 principal amount of Notes tendered (the “Early Tender Premium”). Holders of Notes who validly tender their Notes after the Early Tender Time but at or prior to the Expiration Time will be entitled to receive $1,014.30 per $1,000 principal amount of Notes tendered, subject to the terms and conditions of the Tender Offer, and will not be entitled to receive the Early Tender Premium. In addition, holders whose Notes are accepted for purchase in the Tender Offer will be entitled to receive accrued interest up to, but not including, the applicable settlement date of the Notes, payable in cash. Payment for Notes tendered at or prior to the Early Tender Time is expected to be May 15, 2017 (such acceptance and payment, an “Early Settlement”). Payment for Notes validly tendered after the Early Tender Time but at or prior to the Expiration Time and accepted for purchase will be made promptly after the Expiration Time. Withdrawal rights with respect to the Notes tendered expired at 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on May 12, 2017, and holders who validly tender Notes after the Early Tender Time do not have withdrawal rights. The Tender Offer is subject to the satisfaction or waiver of a number of conditions as set forth in the Offer to Purchase, including the receipt by USG of proceeds from a proposed debt financing on terms reasonably satisfactory to USG, in its sole discretion, generating net proceeds in an amount that USG deems sufficient, together with cash on hand, to effect the repurchase of the Notes validly tendered and accepted for purchase pursuant to the Tender Offer, including payment of any premiums, Accrued Interest (as defined in the Offer to Purchase) and costs and expenses incurred in connection therewith. If USG proceeds with an Early Settlement, all conditions to the Tender Offer will be deemed to be waived, and USG will thereafter accept for purchase and pay for any Notes validly tendered in the Tender Offer To the extent that any Notes are not validly tendered in the Tender Offer, USG intends to redeem such remaining Notes pursuant to the redemption provisions of the indenture governing the Notes at the “make-whole” redemption price specified for the Notes, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, to, but not including, the redemption date. USG intends to deliver an irrevocable notice of redemption to the trustee at the completion of the debt financing. However, no assurance can be given that such untendered Notes will be redeemed as contemplated or at all. USG has retained Wells Fargo Securities, LLC to serve as dealer manager for the Tender Offer. USG has appointed GBS to serve as the depositary and information agent for the Tender Offer. For additional information regarding the terms of the Tender Offer, please contact Wells Fargo Securities, LLC at (866) 309-6316 (toll free) or (704) 410-4760 (collect). Requests for documents and questions regarding the Tender Offer should be directed to GBS at (212) 430-3774 (banks and brokers) or (866) 470-4200 (all others). None of USG, its board of directors, the dealer manager, GBS or the trustee for the Notes, or any of their respective affiliates, is making any recommendation as to whether Holders should tender any Notes in response to the Tender Offer. Holders must make their own decision as to whether to tender any of their Notes and, if so, the principal amount of Notes to tender. Documents for the Tender Offer, including the Offer to Purchase and the related Letter of Transmittal, are available at www.gbsc-usa.com/USG/, and may also be obtained by contacting GBS by telephone. This announcement is for informational purposes only and does not constitute an offer to buy or the solicitation of an offer to sell securities. The Tender Offer is being made solely by means of the Offer to Purchase and the related Letter of Transmittal. The Tender Offer is not being made to holders of Notes in any jurisdiction in which the making or acceptance thereof would not be in compliance with the securities, blue sky or other laws of such jurisdiction. In those jurisdictions where the securities, blue sky or other laws require any tender offer to be made by a licensed broker or dealer, the Tender Offer will be deemed to be made on behalf of USG by the dealer manager or one or more registered brokers or dealers licensed under the laws of such jurisdiction. USG Corporation is an industry-leading manufacturer of building products and innovative solutions. Headquartered in Chicago, USG serves construction markets around the world through its United States Gypsum Company and USG Interiors, LLC subsidiaries and its international subsidiaries, including its USG Boral Building Products joint venture. Its wall, ceiling, flooring, sheathing and roofing products provide the solutions that enable customers to build the outstanding spaces where people live, work and play. Its USG Boral Building Products joint venture is a leading plasterboard and ceilings producer across Asia, Australasia and the Middle East. This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 related to management’s expectations about future conditions, including but not limited to, the terms and timing of the Tender Offer and the redemption of any remaining Notes. Actual business, market or other conditions may differ materially from management’s expectations and, accordingly, may affect USG’s sales and profitability or other results and liquidity. Any forward-looking statements represent USG’s views only as of today and should not be relied upon as representing USG’s views as of any subsequent date and USG undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement. Actual results may differ materially due to various other factors, including: economic conditions, such as employment, household formation, home ownership rate, existing home price trends, availability of mortgage financing, interest rates, consumer confidence, job growth and discretionary business investment; USG’s ability to maintain or achieve price increases; the loss of one or more major customers; the impact on USG’s performance and financial results due to the disposition of L&W Supply, one of USG’s largest customers; competitive conditions, such as price, quality and range of products; unexpected operational difficulties or catastrophic events at USG’s facilities; an increasing number of USG’s customers having significant buying power; increased costs, or decreased availability, of key raw materials or energy; USG’s ability to successfully operate the joint venture with Boral Limited, including risks that USG’s joint venture partner, Boral Limited, may not fulfill its obligations as an investor or may take actions that are inconsistent with USG’s objectives; exposure to risks of operating internationally; USG’s ability to innovate and protect USG’s intellectual property and other proprietary rights; USG’s ability to make capital expenditures and achieve the expected return on investment; a disruption in USG’s information technology systems; significant changes in factors and assumptions used to measure USG’s defined benefit plan obligations; changes in laws or regulations, including environmental and safety regulations; the outcome in legal and governmental proceedings; the ability of a small number of stockholders to influence USG’s business and stock price; USG’s ability to successfully pursue and complete acquisitions, joint ventures and other transactions to complement or expand USG’s businesses; USG’s ability to return capital to stockholders; the occurrence of an “ownership change” within the meaning of the Internal Revenue Code; ability to incur substantial additional indebtedness; the effects of acts of terrorism or war upon domestic and international economies and financial markets; and acts of God. USG assumes no obligation to update any forward-looking information contained in this press release. Additional information concerning these and other factors may be found in USG’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the “Risk Factors” in USG’s most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

JPD Financial is sponsoring the 17th Shared Services for Finance & Accounting. JPD Financial will be joined by top industry leaders, June 21-23 at the Highlands in Dallas, Texas. In its 17th installment, Shared Services for F&A offers greater interactivity and has an 80% new speaker faculty. The 2017 program will be premiering a series of hour-long clinics to help attendees optimize their 3rd-party provider relationships, master data management, and integrate Smart Technology into their automation roadmaps. Speakers include Jonathan Kepets, Global Head of Business Analysis & Reporting, Cantor Fitzgerald; Bryan Ternes, Vice President of Finance – GBS, Levi Strauss & Co.; Brenda McCoy, Americas R2R, Global Finance Shared Services, Apple, Inc.; John Nderitu, Staff VP, Business Improvement Group, Anthem; Scott Gillan, Executive Director of Transformation & Service Management, Enterprise Financial Services, Warner Bros.; and Misty Thorpe, Business Leader, GBSC Accounting Services, and MasterCard. “With an impressive line-up of speakers and hands-on clinics, this year’s event Shared Services for F & A promises attendees exceptional opportunities to learn and network with experts,” said Alexa Bradley, Vice President of Business Development and Marketing for JPD Financial. “We look forward to contributing to the program and helping attendees learn how to transform their service delivery into the indispensable backbone of the business.” The event is designed to include a four pre-conference workshops, 2 main conference days, Process Improvement Clinics, Quickfire Intelligence Labs, and more than 7 hours of networking to discuss the most important challenges and most effective strategies and solutions within the industry. JPD Financial will be featured in the comprehensive expo hall that is showcasing innovative solutions and services for the industry. JPD is a professional service provider that employs a team of highly skilled individuals who communicate directly with their client’s suppliers. As the audit landscape continues to evolve, JPD has become proficient in rebalancing expectations and offering a solution that is advantageous to its clients. About JPD Financial: For more than 30 years, JPD Financial has worked behind the scenes on behalf of Fortune 1000 clients to research and uncover funds that would otherwise be lost in today’s automated systems and written off due to accounting miscommunications. They work with their clients’ suppliers to research credits, overpayments, and misapplied or duplicate payments that appear on their records, but which may not appear on the standard statements their clients receive. JPD Financial is headquartered in Santa Clara, California with a European office in Harpenden, UK to serve its global clients. JPD Financial’s client base includes major vertical industries such as healthcare, telecommunications, energy, consumer goods, oil and gas, and manufacturing. For more information, visit http://www.JPDFinancial.com. About IQPC: IQPC produces 1,500 global events that are custom-tailored to the unique needs of business executives. Founded in 1973, IQPC leverages an office network that spans six continents and a wealth of intellectual capital to provide an unparalleled portfolio of conferences and seminars. For more information, please visit http://www.iqpc.com.

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