Moscow, Russia
Moscow, Russia

Open Joint Stock Company Gazprom is the largest extractor of natural gas in the world and one of the world's largest companies. Its name is a contraction of the Russian words Gazovaya Promyshlennost . Its headquarters are in Moscow. Gazprom was created in 1989 when the Soviet Ministry of Gas Industry converted to a corporation, retaining all its assets. The company was later partly privatised, although the Russian government currently holds a majority stake. In 2011, the company produced about 513.2 billion cubic metres of natural gas, amounting to more than 17% of worldwide gas production. In addition, Gazprom produced about 32.3 million tons of crude oil and nearly 12.1 million tons of gas condensate. Gazprom's activities accounted for 8% of Russia's gross domestic product in 2011.Gazprom's major production fields are located around the Gulf of Ob in Western Siberia, and the Yamal Peninsula is expected to become the company's main gas producing region in the future. Gazprom possesses the largest gas transport system in the world, with approximately 158,200 kilometres of gas trunk lines. Major new pipeline projects include Nord Stream and South Stream. The company has a number of subsidiaries in various industrial sectors, including finance, media and aviation, as well as majority stakes in various companies. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

El Global Day of Football and Friendship se proclamó por primera vez en el año 2014 a través de los jóvenes embajadores del programa International Children's Social FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP apoyado por la FIFA y la UEFA. En ese día, todo el mundo que comparte los valores más importantes, como la igualdad, respeto a otras culturas y existencia pacífica se coloca un brazalete de la amistad azul y verde en la mano. El azul que lleva el brazalete simboliza la paz del cielo, mientras que el verde es un símbolo del campo de fútbol, siendo accesible para todo el mundo. SOURCE Global Press Center of the Gazprom FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP programme


Der Global Day of Football and Friendship war erstmalig 2014 von den jungen Botschaftern des International Children's Social FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP-Programms mit Unterstützung der FIFA und UEFA ausgerufen worden. An diesem Tag trägt jeder, der zentrale Werte wie die Achtung gegenüber anderen Kulturen, Gleichheit und friedliche Existenz teilt, ein blaugrünes Freundschaftsarmband. Der blaue Teil des Bandes steht symbolisch für den friedlichen blauen Himmel, der grüne Teil symbolisiert den Fußballrasen, der jedem offensteht. Das Freundschaftsarmband tragen in diesem Jahr auch Hugo Tinelli, der führenden TV-Produzent in Argentinien, Xu Li, Nachrichtenagentur-Chefredakteur in China, Dimos Piros, dreifacher Olympiasieger aus Griechenland, Miodrag Bozhevich, der renommierte Trainer aus Serbien und Kevin Bloom, FIFA-Schiedsrichter aus den Niederlanden. "Es ist wichtig, dass dieser Tag in einer Zeit stattfindet, in der Menschen auf der ganzen Welt ihr Engagement für den Grundsatz von Gleichheit und gegenseitigem Respekt bezeugen sollten. FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP bietet die Plattform dafür, und vermittelt uns durch die junge Generation ein Bekenntnis zu Frieden und Freundschaft, unabhängig von Geschlecht, Alter und körperlichen Fähigkeiten. Es ist ein großartiges Gefühl, als nationaler FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP 2017-Veranstalter in Pakistan wirken zu dürfen und ich hoffe, dass wir in Zukunft diese Plattform auch in unser Land bringen und Kinder aus aller Welt nach Pakistan einladen können", erklärte Fahad Khan von der Pakistan Football Federation. SOURCE Global Press Center of the Gazprom FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP programme


For the first time the Global Day of Football and Friendship was proclaimed in 2014 by the young ambassadors of the International Children's Social FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP programme supported by FIFA and UEFA. During this day, everyone who shares the most important values, such as equality, respect for other cultures and peaceful existence bind a blue-green Friendship bracelet to his hand. The blue string of the bracelet symbolizes the peaceful sky, and the green string symbolizes the football field, accessible to everyone. This year Friendship bracelet began to wear Hugo Tinelli, the leading TV producer in Argentina, Xu Li, the editor-in-chief of the news agency in China, Dimos Piros, three-time Olympic winner from Greece, Miodrag Bozhevich, the famous coach from Serbia, Kevin Bloom, FIFA referee from the Netherlands. The events were attended by famous football players, including Serbian defender Branislav Ivanovich and Russian goalkeeper Yuri Lodygin from FC Zenit (St. Petersburg, Russia), Dutch striker Dirk Kuyt from FC Feyenoord (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). In Athens, the event was attended by the winner of the European Football Championship 2004 as part of the national team, Theodoras Zagarakis, who is a member of the European Parliament from Greece. "It is important that this day comes at a time when people all over the world need to confirm their commitment to the principle of equality and respect for each other. FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP gives this opportunity and through the younger generation teaches people to commitment of peace and friendship regardless of gender, age and physical abilities. It feels great to be appointed as a national FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP 2017 operator in Pakistan and I hope that in the future we can also bring this platform to our country and invite children from across the world to Pakistan," shared emotions  Fahad Khan, Pakistan Football Federation. SOURCE Global Press Center of the Gazprom FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP programme


For the first time the Global Day of Football and Friendship was proclaimed in 2014 by the young ambassadors of the International Children's Social FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP programme supported by FIFA and UEFA. During this day, everyone who shares the most important values, such as equality, respect for other cultures and peaceful existence bind a blue-green Friendship bracelet to his hand. The blue string of the bracelet symbolizes the peaceful sky, and the green string symbolizes the football field, accessible to everyone. This year Friendship bracelet began to wear Hugo Tinelli, the leading TV producer in Argentina, Xu Li, the editor-in-chief of the news agency in China, Dimos Piros, three-time Olympic winner from Greece, Miodrag Bozhevich, the famous coach from Serbia, Kevin Bloom, FIFA referee from the Netherlands. The events were attended by famous football players, including Serbian defender Branislav Ivanovich and Russian goalkeeper Yuri Lodygin from FC Zenit (St. Petersburg, Russia), Dutch striker Dirk Kuyt from FC Feyenoord (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). In Athens, the event was attended by the winner of the European Football Championship 2004 as part of the national team, Theodoras Zagarakis, who is a member of the European Parliament from Greece. "It is important that this day comes at a time when people all over the world need to confirm their commitment to the principle of equality and respect for each other. FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP gives this opportunity and through the younger generation teaches people to commitment of peace and friendship regardless of gender, age and physical abilities. It feels great to be appointed as a national FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP 2017 operator in Pakistan and I hope that in the future we can also bring this platform to our country and invite children from across the world to Pakistan," shared emotions  Fahad Khan, Pakistan Football Federation. SOURCE Global Press Center of the Gazprom FOOTBALL FOR FRIENDSHIP programme


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

When Trump and Putin finally meet, we could well see the emergence of a new axis of resurgence for the fossil fuel industry. A spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin said a week last Friday that the Russian leader is keen to meet with US President Trump. That now seems an age ago, since Trump’s U-turn on Syria. It seemed likely then that the meeting would be soon. But when they do finally meet, as they must, even if they don’t have policy on Syria and the Ukraine in common, there’s something else on which they do share much: a love of coal, gas and oil. Both Trump and Putin support this industry – and the mining industry in general – and deprecate climate change and the Paris Agreement. People close to the powerful Russian oil community say that both countries see energy cooperation as one of the few common grounds to move the strained relations forward. Putin and Trump have much in common on the topic of energy. As InsideClimate has pointed out last year: Russia is the fifth-largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world. Yet the plan it submitted under the Paris agreement to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 is one of the weakest of any government and actually permits Russia to increase carbon pollution over time. The Paris Agreement went into effect last November, but Russia is the only major emitter that has not ratified it. Instead, it has laid out a timetable that would delay ratification for almost three years. Trump’s climate-sceptic appointee to head the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, has not confirmed whether the United States will remain in the global climate change pact. The meeting looks likely to happen in Finland once it assumes chair of the Arctic Council. This is significant because the Council is a forum for discussing access to the mineral rights of the sea-bed within the circle. Due to climate change (which Trump does not believe in) and melting of the Arctic sea-ice, more energy resources and waterways are now becoming accessible. Both leaders want access to the vast reserves of oil and gas known to exist there. Their desire is vigorously opposed by environmentalists. Putin’s government famously imprisoned Greenpeace activists in 2013 for protesting about Russian oil exploration in the Arctic. Igor Yusufov, Russian energy minister (2001-2004) who presided over the privatisation of the industry is now, oddly, head of US$3 billion energy investment Fund Energy. This fund does deals in oil and gas projects with the likes of US oil service multinational Halliburton. Yusufov has issued a statement supporting greater cooperation between the two superpowers. He believes that Russia and the USA will discuss the development of coal production and corresponding technologies. Russia is in possession of the world’s second largest coal reserves. Yusufov has known Trump’s Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, formerly head of ExxonMobil, since 2002. He is enthusiastic about Tillerson’s involvement in building bridges between the two countries – and forging links on energy. Tillerson has been involved in Russian energy projects since January 1998 when he took over ExxonMobil’s operations in Russia and the Caspian Sea region. ExxonMobil and Gazprom did very well out of Tillerson’s involvement in Russia. Both sides will be hoping this success can be repeated. In connection with the ongoing suspicions about Mr Trump’s connections to Russia, and the degree of support he received from Mr Putin, John McCain, a senator from Arizona, has said he is “very concerned” about Tillerson’s 2013 acceptance of Russia’s Order of Friendship from Mr Putin. The man Tillerson will be talking to is foreign minister Sergei Lavrov, whom Yusufov speaks admiringly about and says “also possesses a profound knowledge in energy”. Trump will be jealous of Russia’s achievements with its coal industry. Contrary to the state of affairs in the US, which he wants to reverse, in the last five years Russian coal production increased by 12.7 per cent. Yusufov attributes this to the benefits of privatisation. Much of the increase is due to open-cast mining, which has lax environmental controls – another (non)-policy favoured by both Trump and Putin. Yusufov says that Russia is concerned about the likely slowdown in global demand for coal due to the Paris Agreement. But its Energy Ministry still forecasts an increase in production to 425 million tons in 2020 and to 480 m tons in 2030. How does this square with being a signatory of the Paris Agreement? It doesn’t. Russia says one thing and does another. This is its form of Orwellian “doublethink”. An example is Yusufov’s statement: “We see [the Paris Agreement] as a cornerstone of the future environmentally conscious world. At the same time we clearly understand, that at this stage the Russian economy would not survive without hydrocarbons our companies explore and produce.” At least Russia is honest about wanting to have its climate cake and eat it. As with the West’s misplaced faith in carbon capture to achieve this dual end, Putin believes in nanotubes. He mentioned them in Paris prior to the climate change conference. He said that these Russian-made fibres, one billionth of a metre in diameter, will “cut Russian CO2 emissions by 160-180 million tons”. Russia currently emits 2322 Mt CO2 a year, or 5.4 per cent of global emissions. In the US last week, Trump signed an order – which would need to be passed by Congress – rolling back former President Barack Obama’s climate change policies, including the Clean Power Plan to slash carbon emissions from power plants. This would damage the United States’ ability to meet its Paris commitments. Only the U.S. Congress stands between this emerging alliance and the goals of the Paris Agreement. The world will be watching this summit more closely than it has watched any summit in the last few years. David Thorpe is the author of a number of books on energy, buildings and sustainability. See his website here.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Inside the U. S. nuclear energy industry, there is a high level of respect and admiration – along with a barely suppressed tinge of jealousy – for the way that the Republic of Korea (aka South Korea) has steadily developed its world class nuclear power plant manufacturing and construction industry. Starting from zero operating plants in the mid 1970s, South Korea now has 28 units that reliably supply one third of its electricity. Current plans call for a continued building program to increase that capacity by 70% to 38 units by 2029. It has also won oversees contracts with the most visible one being a $20 billion dollar construction contract for four APR-1400 reactors. Successful progress on that construction project was a factor in winning a contract to operate the facilities, valued at nearly $50 billion over a 60 year period. That shining light for the nuclear industry is being threatened by an upcoming election. South Korea Is A Unique Example Of Positive Learning In Nuclear With the consistent backing of the government and a highly organized network of suppliers providing materials and components to the state-owned monopoly utility company responsible for building the plants, the South Korean nuclear enterprise has achieved remarkable success. Unlike almost every other country, it has steadily increased its capability, trained new workers, refined manufacturing techniques, learned how to schedule complex projects – even in distant lands like the United Arab Emirates – and managed to deliver final products that work on a schedule and within a budget. According to a recent study led by Jessica Lovering, the Director of Energy at the Breakthrough Institute, the South Korean method of steady learning and improvement worked. That success is not surprising to anyone who understands the importance of practice, steady effort, predictable investments and growing sophistication in an environment where the government and the public are generally supportive instead of antagonistic. All has not been rosy in recent years; there have been several parts and component related scandals that have caused significant periods of forced outages in order to inspect plants and, in some cases, replace counterfeit materials or components. There has also been a widely publicized incident of computer hacking involving a company that is part of the South Korean nuclear power enterprise. From the other side of the world, though, it appears that most of those issues have been addressed and recovery is well underway. Since the great Northeast Japan earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, there has been an increasingly vocal movement that resisting the continued development of nuclear power plants and is even agitating for efforts to close and destroy plants that are already completed and not even close to the natural end of their operating lives. One of the more visible and politically important members of the movement seems to be Park Won-soon, the mayor of Seoul, South Korea's largest city. In a piece titled Solar Seoul Shows How Eco-Friendly Cities Can Work, Park clearly laid out his thoughts on energy supplies. More worryingly, Park Geun-hye, formerly the President of South Korea, was impeached following revelations that she had abused her political office. In cooperation with a friend and a former aide, she pressed large enterprises to send money to foundations set up to support her political objectives. Park's impeachment was upheld by the Supreme Court in early March, starting a 60 day clock that will result in a new election before mid May. Moon Jae-in, a leading candidate from the opposition Democratic Party, has promised to take action to reduce coal consumption, phase out the nuclear industry by 2060 and replace both with additional imports of natural gas, both in the form of LNG and potentially via a pipeline through North Korea. Moon has also pledged to pave the way for achieving 'nuclear zero' by around 2060, to address growing public fears about safety, particularly in the wake of the country's biggest earthquake in September last year, which forced four nuclear reactors to close for three months. "I will make South Korea build no more nuclear reactors and close down aged nuclear reactors when their lifespan expire," Moon said. "Through this, South Korea can arrive at nuclear zero in 2060, and until then, we can develop alternative sources," he said. The best alternative to coal and nuclear, Moon said, is renewable sources, but it would take a long time for them to meet electricity demand. "So, South Korea needs to consider purchasing natural gas from neighboring Russia by building a pipeline," he said. South Korea's state-run Korea Gas Corp. signed a preliminary agreement with Russia's Gazprom in 2008 to buy 10 Bcm/year of Russian gas for a 30-year period, beginning 2015. The scandal that led to the ouster of Park Geun-hye has resulted in increasing opposition to the status quo of a South Korea whose economy is led by enormous, export oriented manufacturing enterprises. If the reaction leads to the election of an avowed opponent to continued nuclear energy expansion, he might single-handedly reverse the progress that the Korean Electric Power Company (KEPCO) has achieved in learning how to build large nuclear plants. If the country stops building reactors at home, it will have substantially more difficulty maintaining its ability to successfully export the technology. If a shift away from nuclear energy production is implemented, it will result in a South Korea that is increasingly dependent on a natural gas supply from Russia through North Korea and on imports of liquified gas. That situation would have rippling effects through both the energy industry and world geopolitics. It almost goes without saying that there are plenty of suppliers in the natural gas industry that would love to profit from increased sales to South Korea. The increased demand will help keep world prices high and profitable while every commodity business enjoys situations that increase their sales volume. There are also plenty of interests in Russia, North Korea and China that would like build more links binding South Korea to their fuel exports, making the government less willing and able to cooperate with the United States. This is a development that is worth close attention and interest.


News Article | April 18, 2017
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

Inside the U. S. nuclear energy industry, there is a high level of respect and admiration – along with a barely suppressed tinge of jealousy – for the way that the Republic of Korea (aka South Korea) has steadily developed its world class nuclear power plant manufacturing and construction industry. Starting from zero operating plants in the mid 1970s, South Korea now has 28 units that reliably supply one third of its electricity. Current plans call for a continued building program to increase that capacity by 70% to 38 units by 2029. It has also won oversees contracts with the most visible one being a $20 billion dollar construction contract for four APR-1400 reactors. Successful progress on that construction project was a factor in winning a contract to operate the facilities, valued at nearly $50 billion over a 60 year period. That shining light for the nuclear industry is being threatened by an upcoming election. With the consistent backing of the government and a highly organized network of suppliers providing materials and components to the state-owned monopoly utility company responsible for building the plants, the South Korean nuclear enterprise has achieved remarkable success. Unlike almost every other country, it has steadily increased its capability, trained new workers, refined manufacturing techniques, learned how to schedule complex projects – even in distant lands like the United Arab Emirates – and managed to deliver final products that work on a schedule and within a budget. According to a recent study led by Jessica Lovering, the Director of Energy at the Breakthrough Institute, the South Korean method of steady learning and improvement worked. That success is not surprising to anyone who understands the importance of practice, steady effort, predictable investments and growing sophistication in an environment where the government and the public are generally supportive instead of antagonistic. All has not been rosy in recent years; there have been several parts and component related scandals that have caused significant periods of forced outages in order to inspect plants and, in some cases, replace counterfeit materials or components. There has also been a widely publicized incident of computer hacking involving a company that is part of the South Korean nuclear power enterprise. From the other side of the world, though, it appears that most of those issues have been addressed and recovery is well underway. Since the great Northeast Japan earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, there has been an increasingly vocal movement that resisting the continued development of nuclear power plants and is even agitating for efforts to close and destroy plants that are already completed and not even close to the natural end of their operating lives. One of the more visible and politically important members of the movement seems to be Park Won-soon, the mayor of Seoul, South Korea’s largest city. In a piece titled Solar Seoul Shows How Eco-Friendly Cities Can Work, Park clearly laid out his thoughts on energy supplies. More worryingly, Park Geun-hye, formerly the President of South Korea, was impeached following revelations that she had abused her political office. In cooperation with a friend and a former aide, she pressed large enterprises to send money to foundations set up to support her political objectives. Park’s impeachment was upheld by the Supreme Court in early March, starting a 60 day clock that will result in a new election before mid May. Moon Jae-in, a leading candidate from the leftist Democratic Party, has promised to take action to reduce coal consumption, phase out the nuclear industry by 2060 and replace both with additional imports of natural gas, both in the form of LNG and potentially via a pipeline through North Korea. Moon has also pledged to pave the way for achieving ‘nuclear zero’ by around 2060, to address growing public fears about safety, particularly in the wake of the country’s biggest earthquake in September last year, which forced four nuclear reactors to close for three months. “I will make South Korea build no more nuclear reactors and close down aged nuclear reactors when their lifespan expire,” Moon said. “Through this, South Korea can arrive at nuclear zero in 2060, and until then, we can develop alternative sources,” he said. The best alternative to coal and nuclear, Moon said, is renewable sources, but it would take a long time for them to meet electricity demand. “So, South Korea needs to consider purchasing natural gas from neighboring Russia by building a pipeline,” he said. South Korea’s state-run Korea Gas Corp. signed a preliminary agreement with Russia’s Gazprom in 2008 to buy 10 Bcm/year of Russian gas for a 30-year period, beginning 2015. During the past several weeks, as tensions have dramatically increased on the Korean Peninsula, Ahn Cheol-soo, a relative political newcomer has been rising rapidly in the polls. Many of the conservatives that worry about Moon’s interest in moving closer to North Korea are telling poll takers that they favor Mr. Ahn, even though his party only holds 40 seats out of the 300 seats in Parliament. He’s a former medical doctor, a successful software entrepreneur, an academic dean, a graduate of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and a populist. He is both a friend of the United States and an reformer who wants to address rising income inequality and restructure the chebol, the large, integrated conglomerates that dominate the South Korean export-based economy. His stance on nuclear energy is less specific than Mr. Moon’s, but he has indicated in the past that he is skeptical about the plan to build a significant number of new nuclear plants in South Korea and would favor increasing dependence on imported LNG. With my long distance perspective, it appears that Mr. Ahn’s skepticism on nuclear energy may be related to its status as being state-owned and controlled by the same kind of people that run the chebol. Since he is not a career politician, Ahn might be more interested in a sensible discussion about the benefits of nuclear energy than his more ideologically driven opponent. The scandal that led to the ouster of Park Geun-hye has resulted in increasing opposition to the status quo of a South Korea whose economy is led by enormous, export oriented manufacturing enterprises. If the reaction leads to the election of an avowed opponent to continued nuclear energy expansion, he might single-handedly reverse the progress that the Korean Electric Power Company (KEPCO) has achieved in learning how to build large nuclear plants. If the country stops building reactors at home, it will have substantially more difficulty maintaining its ability to successfully export the technology. If a shift away from nuclear energy production is implemented, it will result in a South Korea that is increasingly dependent on a natural gas supply from Russia through North Korea and on imports of liquified gas. That situation would have rippling effects through both the energy industry and world geopolitics. It almost goes without saying that there are plenty of suppliers in the natural gas industry that would love to profit from increased sales to South Korea. The increased demand will help keep world prices high and profitable while every commodity business enjoys situations that increase their sales volume. There are also plenty of interests in Russia, North Korea and China that would like build more links binding South Korea to their fuel exports, making the government less willing and able to cooperate with the United States. Note: A version of the above was first published on Forbes.com. It is republished here with permission. The post Implications Of South Korean Presidential Election On Its World Class Nuclear Industry appeared first on Atomic Insights.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Global Helium Industry Report covering market by types, Regions, Application, and leading vendor’s profile based on sales, price, sales regions, products, profile etcPune, India - April 24, 2017 /MarketersMedia/ — Global Helium Market 2012- 2022 Report provides detailed analysis of market in 9 chapters with required tables and figures. Access this report at https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-helium-market-research-2011-2022 Global Helium Market report classifies Helium types as Gaseous Type and Liquid Type. Applications covered in this report are Croygenics Aerostatics Semicconductor & Fiber Optics Leak Detection & Gas Chromatography and Welding. This report also provides key analysis for the geographical regions like Europe, North America, China, Japan & Korea. Companies like RasGas, Exxon, Linde, Air Product, Praxair, Air Liquide, Gazprom, PGNiG and more are profiled in this report providing information on sale, price, sales regions, products and overview. Purchase a copy of this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/483899 Table of Contents: 1 Market Overview 1.1 Objectives of Research 1.2 Market Segment 2 Industry Chain 2.1 Industry Chain Structure 2.2 Upstream 2.3 Market 3 Environmental Analysis 3.1 Policy 3.2 Economic 3.3 Technology 3.4 Market Entry 4 Major Vendors 5 Market/Vendors Distribution 5.1 Regional Distribution 5.2 Product and Application 6 Regions Market 6.1 Global 6.2 Europe 6.3 North America 6.4 China 6.5 Japan & Korea 6.6 Trade 7 Forecast 7.1 Market Trends 7.2 Segment Forecast 8 Marketing Overview 8.1 Ex-factory Price 8.2 Buyer Price 8.3 Price Factors 8.4 Marketing Channel 9 Conclusion Inquire more about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/483899 Contact Info:Name: Shirsh GuptaEmail: sales@themarketreports.comOrganization: The Market ReportsAddress: SF-29, Sacred World, Wanawadi, PunePhone: 6314071315Source URL: http://marketersmedia.com/global-helium-market-is-estimated-to-reach-175-million-usd-in-2017/189675For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-helium-market-research-2011-2022Source: MarketersMediaRelease ID: 189675


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Global Gaseous Helium Industry Report covering market by types, Regions, Application, and leading vendor’s profile based on sales, price, sales regions, products, profile etcPune, India - April 24, 2017 /MarketersMedia/ — Global Gaseous Helium Market 2012- 2022 Report provides detailed analysis of market in 9 chapters with required tables and figures. Access this report at https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-gaseous-helium-market-research-2011-2022 Global Gaseous Helium Market report classifies Gaseous Helium types as Industrial-Grade and Grade A . Applications covered in this report are Cryogenics Aerostatics Pressurizing and Purging Leak Detection and Welding. This report also provides key analysis for the geographical regions like Europe, North America, China, Japan & Korea. Companies like Air Liquide, Air Products & Chemicals, Airgas, Buzwair, Exxon Mobil, Gazprom, Gulf Cryo, Iwatani Corporation, Linde, Messer Group, PGNiG (PL), Praxair, Somatrach, Weil Group Resources and more are profiled in this report providing information on sale, price, sales regions, products and overview. Purchase a copy of this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/483900 Table of Contents: 1 Market Overview 1.1 Objectives of Research 1.2 Market Segment 2 Industry Chain 2.1 Industry Chain Structure 2.2 Upstream 2.3 Market 3 Environmental Analysis 3.1 Policy 3.2 Economic 3.3 Technology 3.4 Market Entry 4 Major Vendors 5 Market/Vendors Distribution 5.1 Regional Distribution 5.2 Product and Application 6 Regions Market 6.1 Global 6.2 Europe 6.3 North America 6.4 China 6.5 Japan & Korea 6.6 Trade 7 Forecast 7.1 Market Trends 7.2 Segment Forecast 8 Marketing Overview 8.1 Ex-factory Price 8.2 Buyer Price 8.3 Price Factors 8.4 Marketing Channel 9 Conclusion Inquire more about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/483900 Contact Info:Name: Shirsh GuptaEmail: sales@themarketreports.comOrganization: The Market ReportsAddress: SF-29, Sacred World, Wanawadi, PunePhone: 6314071315Source URL: http://marketersmedia.com/global-gaseous-helium-market-is-estimated-to-reach-121-million-usd-in-2017/189671For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-gaseous-helium-market-research-2011-2022Source: MarketersMediaRelease ID: 189671


Patent
Gazprom | Date: 2013-12-27

Gas turbine unit (GTV) provides compressed air and steam methane-hydrogen mixture to a combustion chamber to enrich combustion products and cooling by evaporation or superheating of water steam. The temperature of heat exchange processes of the gas turbine unit is increased by additional fuel combustion in the steam-methane-hydrogen mixture postcombustion flow extracted at the output from the additional free work gas turbine, and before supply of steam-methane-hydrogen mixture to the combustion chamber it is previously cooled to the temperature of 200+240 C. with simultaneous differential condensation of water steam. The condensate is processed for preparation of methane steam-gas mixture and low pressure water steam which is passed through the additional free work gas turbine.

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