Moscow, Russia
Moscow, Russia

Open Joint Stock Company Gazprom is the largest extractor of natural gas in the world and one of the world's largest companies. Its name is a contraction of the Russian words Gazovaya Promyshlennost . Its headquarters are in Moscow. Gazprom was created in 1989 when the Soviet Ministry of Gas Industry converted to a corporation, retaining all its assets. The company was later partly privatised, although the Russian government currently holds a majority stake. In 2011, the company produced about 513.2 billion cubic metres of natural gas, amounting to more than 17% of worldwide gas production. In addition, Gazprom produced about 32.3 million tons of crude oil and nearly 12.1 million tons of gas condensate. Gazprom's activities accounted for 8% of Russia's gross domestic product in 2011.Gazprom's major production fields are located around the Gulf of Ob in Western Siberia, and the Yamal Peninsula is expected to become the company's main gas producing region in the future. Gazprom possesses the largest gas transport system in the world, with approximately 158,200 kilometres of gas trunk lines. Major new pipeline projects include Nord Stream and South Stream. The company has a number of subsidiaries in various industrial sectors, including finance, media and aviation, as well as majority stakes in various companies. Wikipedia.


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— WiseGuyReports.com adds Exclusive Research on “Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Sales Market Report 2017” reports to its database. In this report, the global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) market is valued at USD XX million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. Geographically, this report split global into several key Regions, with sales (K Units), revenue (Million USD), market share and growth rate of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) for these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering United States China Europe Japan Southeast Asia India Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) market competition by top manufacturers/players, with Environmental Management Systems (EMS) sales volume, Price (USD/Unit), revenue (Million USD) and market share for each manufacturer/player; the top players including IBM Fujitsu TDK Ricoh Group TUV SUD EY SKF General Services Administration (GSA) Gazprom APC ROHM BSI Group Continental Corporation RELX Group Braun Intertec MTS Allstream Schenck SABS Unilever Southern Company EIZO On the basis of product, this report displays the sales volume (K Units), revenue (Million USD), product price (USD/Unit), market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into ISO 14001 EMAS On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, sales volume, market share and growth rate of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) for each application, including Oil & Gas Water & Waste Water Treatment Power and Energy Telecom and IT Others Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Sales Market Report 2017 1 Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Market Overview 1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) 1.2 Classification of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) by Product Category 1.2.1 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Market Size (Sales) Comparison by Type (2012-2022) 1.2.2 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Market Size (Sales) Market Share by Type (Product Category) in 2016 1.2.3 ISO 14001 1.2.4 EMAS 1.3 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Market by Application/End Users 1.3.1 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Sales (Volume) and Market Share Comparison by Application (2012-2022) 1.3.2 Oil & Gas 1.3.3 Water & Waste Water Treatment 1.3.4 Power and Energy 1.3.5 Telecom and IT 1.3.6 Others 1.4 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Market by Region 1.4.1 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Market Size (Value) Comparison by Region (2012-2022) 1.4.2 United States Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.3 China Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.4 Europe Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.5 Japan Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.6 Southeast Asia Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.4.7 India Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Status and Prospect (2012-2022) 1.5 Global Market Size (Value and Volume) of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) (2012-2022) 1.5.1 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Sales and Growth Rate (2012-2022) 1.5.2 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Revenue and Growth Rate (2012-2022) …. 9 Global Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Players/Suppliers Profiles and Sales Data 9.1 IBM 9.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.1.2 Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Product Category, Application and Specification 9.1.2.1 Product A 9.1.2.2 Product B 9.1.3 IBM Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.2 Fujitsu 9.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.2.2 Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Product Category, Application and Specification 9.2.2.1 Product A 9.2.2.2 Product B 9.2.3 Fujitsu Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.3 TDK 9.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.3.2 Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Product Category, Application and Specification 9.3.2.1 Product A 9.3.2.2 Product B 9.3.3 TDK Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.4 Ricoh Group 9.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.4.2 Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Product Category, Application and Specification 9.4.2.1 Product A 9.4.2.2 Product B 9.4.3 Ricoh Group Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 9.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview 9.5 TUV SUD 9.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Competitors 9.5.2 Environmental Management Systems (EMS) Product Category, Application and Specification 9.5.2.1 Product A 9.5.2.2 Product B …Continued For more information, please visit http://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.technologyreview.com

Don’t look now, but Russia could get greener—and it has nothing to do with climate change melting the Siberian permafrost. In a country known for deriving a huge amount of its wealth and economic activity from state-owned oil and gas companies, it may come as a surprise to hear that president Vladimir Putin has been speaking favorably about clean energy lately. The country’s energy ministry also endorsed a recent report from the International Renewable Energy Agency that suggested that Russia has plenty of potential for developing renewables. There’s certainly plenty of room for improvement. At the moment, renewables account for only about 3.6 percent of Russia’s energy consumption (paywall). By comparison, the U.S., which is itself a laggard compared to many countries, derives about 10 percent of the energy it consumes from renewable sources. According to an article in the Financial Times that cites the IRENA report, Russia could expand its renewable portfolio up to 11.3 percent of consumption by 2030. That would be far from world-beating, but would still require about $15 billion a year in investments, according to IRENA. Even assuming Putin and his administration are serious about backing up their words with deeds, the financial and political might of the fossil fuel giants Gazprom and Rosneft—which are essentially arms of the Russian government—could make ramping up renewables difficult. Russia also lacks a national power grid, so it wouldn’t be able to transport energy generated by, say, wind or solar outside of the regions in which they are generated. This is something that the U.S. struggles with as well, though a revamped grid in Texas has proven that large infrastructure investments can help renewables flourish. Russia, like the U.S. (for the moment, anyway), is a party to the Paris climate agreement, with a pledge to keep its greenhouse gas emissions at least 25 percent below 1990 levels by 2020. While it hasn’t been terribly transparent on how it plans to do that—or outlined any plans for further cuts—it has said it is cleaning up emissions from flaring at oil and gas fields. And in statements made to the United Nations ahead of climate talks later this week, Russian officials wrote that their country was planning a more than tenfold increase in non-hydroelectric renewables by 2035.


News Article | May 7, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

"Construction of the TurkStream gas pipeline began in the Black Sea near the Russian coast," Gazprom said in a statement (AFP Photo/ERIC PIERMONT) Moscow (AFP) - Russian gas firm Gazprom said Sunday construction had begun of a gas pipeline under the Black Sea to Turkey meant to eventually also serve the European Union. "Construction of the TurkStream gas pipeline began in the Black Sea near the Russian coast," Gazprom said in a statement. "Implementation of the project is on schedule and our Turkish and European customers will from the end of 2019 have a reliable new route for importing Russian gas," said Gazprom's chief executive Alexei Miller in the statement. Russia first floated the project in 2014 after the EU blocked plans for a pipeline under the Black Sea to Bulgaria at the height of the Ukraine crisis. A diplomatic crisis following the shooting down of a Russian bomber overflying the Turkish-Syrian border delayed the project, which was revived when bilateral relations were mended last year. Two lines capable of carrying 15.75 billion cubic metres of gas per year each will be built. With Turkstream Russia aims to not only reinforce its capacity to deliver gas to Turkey, but to also make it a transit country in place of Ukraine, even if the prospects of that are uncertain given the EU's hostility towards new Russian pipelines.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

Ben van Beurden, the chief executive of Royal Dutch Shell, took time to speak to The Washington Post on May 17 during a visit to Washington, and he touched on the oil giant’s transformation, climate change, millennials, the new Trump administration, economic sanctions and the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. It’s been a turbulent couple of years for the Shell CEO. With the roller coaster in crude oil prices, the company’s stock has lurched from a high of $83.12 a share six months after he took charge to a low of $36.87. The stock has climbed back, but revenue has plunged by a third since 2013. The shareholders’ annual meeting is on May 23 at The Hague. Along the way, van Beurden has been reorienting Shell, placing more emphasis on natural gas and less on oil, based on the theory that as climate concerns grow companies will favor gas because of its lower carbon dioxide emissions. Last year, Shell made a $53 billion acquisition of BG Group, which is big in the growing liquefied natural gas market. At the same time, van Beurden has abandoned some of Royal Dutch Shell’s high-profile oil ventures. He halted the unsuccessful $7 billion quest to find oil off Alaska’s Chukchi Sea coast; he sold the company’s oil, or tar, sands holdings in Alberta, and he sold some older oil fields in the North Sea. Eager to reduce debt after purchasing BG, van Beurden has sold about $30 billion worth of assets. This article is edited for clarity and brevity. You’ve said that Royal Dutch Shell was making a transition toward becoming more of a natural gas company. How is that going? It is not a just a single-minded transition from oil to gas. It is, actually, making investment choices and evolving our portfolio into what we think is very competitive but also very resilient portfolio. We’ve always seen that gas was going to be the fastest growing hydrocarbon, twice as fast as oil. And within the gas family, LNG is growing twice as fast as the average gas. Therefore, making a bet on that part of the hydrocarbon segment is a sensible choice. We have a strong focus also on petrochemicals. We believe petrochemicals, for slightly different but nevertheless fundamental demographic megatrend reasons, will continue to grow faster than GDP. But also we have to have investment strategies on renewable energy whether biofuels or straightforward investments or new business models that somehow are related. Gas is probably closest to our traditional pedigree, but also the single largest component in our growth strategy. We made a major step forward with BG. Now we are, of the international oil companies, far and away the largest LNG integrated gas player. The last time we met the United States and Europe had imposed economic sanctions on Russia over the annexation of Crimea. Does Shell believe these sanctions are still needed and how might it deal with an easing of sanctions there and in Iran, where sanctions have already been eased somewhat. We have a history in Iran but, at the moment, we have nothing in Iran. We comply with sanctions, and there is no question about it. When sanctions were put on we ceased all our activities in and with Iran as we were obligated to do. We have a trading relationship with the national oil company of Iran which is allowed under the loosened sanctions regime. We established that again. But investment in Iran is a different story. The country has lot of potential. Iranians would like to have access to modern technology like the technologies we have. We have been in a dialogue with the Iranians but ultimately we have to decide: Is the opportunity there attractive for us within the terms and conditions that would allow us to compete for capital in our portfolio? We are a long way off from making that determination. How would investing in Iran work and specifically what do we think the attitude of Europe and the United States would be toward Iran and would that be an environment that would allow us to move forward? The good thing is we have plenty of options. We are in a continuous mode of deciding which ones to move forward with within the capital discipline we have placed ourselves under. We have said we are going to invest no more than $25 billion to $30 billion a year, definitely not more than $30 billion. In today’s oil price environment probably closer to $25 billion. We are not scraping the bottom of the barrel so to speak for opportunities. Russia is a different story. We are a significant player in Russia. We have some very high quality and strategic assets. The sanctions regime on Russia is such that we are free to invest in these opportunities. Of course there are constraints on certain areas of the industry and we’re not playing in those. In terms of investments that we can do we are pursuing our venture with Gazprom in Sakhalin [Island, a giant oil and gas export facility on Russia’s east coast]. We are looking for opportunities to replicate a joint venture on the Baltic Sea, an energy project that would be very strategic for both our companies. We also have a downstream business we invest in. And we play a small role, more of a financing role, with Gazprom in the Nord Stream 2 [gas pipeline] project coming into Europe. We consider Russia in that sense a strategic partner, certainly Gazprom. Simply also because if you look at geology and geography — two things that you cannot change — it makes a lot of sense to bring gas from the largest gas resource in world close to the largest market. So there is an intrinsic rationale for developing that resource.  We want to be a player in that space. Certainly if we are free to do so. How do you view President Trump and his administration and the prospect of changes in policies? It will take some time before the policy contours become very clear. More philosophically what you could say is that this administration is clearly keen to improve the investment climate in the United States, certainly for energy. The United States is the single most important country in our portfolio by whatever metric you choose. There is no country in which we invest as much as in the United States. He wants to revive the Keystone XL pipeline in which you had originally reserved space for oil from Alberta’s oil sands. We basically sold down our oil sands position. We don’t see ourselves investing more in oil sands. We now have basically gotten out of it. To have evacuation infrastructure may still be needed but not for us. How do you see future oil and gas demand amid political pressure over carbon emissions and the changing driving habits of millennials? Will these political and demographic changes constrain the oil and gas industry? I believe what has changed most is the acceptance by ever more people that this energy transition — driven by climate change and the actions of governments, or the attitudes of millennials [and their] lifestyle changes — all that has pointed more and more toward an energy transition that is unstoppable. At same time, it is clear that the growth in energy demand is also unstoppable. And the demographics or megatrends there are that more people and more people aspire to the lifestyle of the western developed world and that also has to be accommodated. What hasn’t quite registered in people’s minds is that these two forces that compete and collide with each other and make up an exquisitely complex puzzle that we have to solve as a society. Therefore the relatively simplistic narrative that more renewables will take care of everything or that we just need to leave it in ground and everything will be fine is in my mind an impossible story to believe in. [In Western society, people say] if I can have an electric car everybody can. If I can insulate my house everybody can. And my son doesn’t have driver’s license nobody will anymore. But the big global trend is a different story altogether. It’s unfortunate. I would love for society to finally grasp the magnitude of the challenge that we are really dealing with. The opportunity set that comes with it is evolving all the time. The more we see individual governments taking actions, the more we see disruptions taking place, the more we are able to find business models that take advantage of it. For a company like ours, we aren’t in the business of just getting oil out of the ground and putting it in a pipe or into a ship and then we make money. We are a much more sophisticated company. We are not a one trick pony. We have never been a one trick pony. Increasingly we see more ways to differentiate ourselves to be not only a successful navigator in the energy transition but to be an absolute winner at the end. Many members of the Trump administration don’t believe in climate change. What are your views? We believe that climate change is real. We believe that the threat of climate change is real. And we believe that action is needed. It doesn’t mean we have to kiss hydrocarbons goodbye. In fact, we can’t. But it does mean that we have to make more intelligent choices. The Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries meets on May 25. How do you view OPEC? The demise of OPEC, which has many times been touted as imminent or already happened, is overdone. OPEC is a very significant voice and a very significant actor. Maybe its volumetric share is less than what it used to be decades ago, but they still have a very important role in stabilizing oil markets. In a way, stable oil markets is a good thing. My concern is not whether the oil price is $30 or $130. My concern is whether it will be oscillating. [When prices fluctuate,] people are drawn in by the hundreds of thousands and then laid off by the hundreds of thousands. Socially it is not a good thing and it creates a structure that breeds inefficiency. So I’m a great fan of stability.


News Article | May 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Michael Caputo, who worked for the president during the primary campaign, invited for voluntary interview A former Trump campaign adviser has been asked to testify before the House intelligence committee over accusations of Russian meddling in the 2016 election. The Guardian has confirmed that Michael Caputo, a campaign aide to Trump for much of the presidential primary, has been asked to submit to a voluntary interview with the committee and provide any documents requested. The committee’s request was first reported by Maggie Haberman of the New York Times. It comes as Trump is facing increased scrutiny over allegations about his campaign’s ties to Russia. Former FBI director Robert Mueller was appointed as a special counsel this week to investigate Trump’s campaign and the Washington Post has reported that a current White House official is a “person of interest” in the ongoing investigation. The parade of accusations, which also include claims that Trump fired former FBI director James Comey after pressuring him to drop an investigation into Russia, come as the President makes his first overseas trip since taking office. Trump landed in Saudi Arabia on Saturday where he sealed a trade pact to sell up to $110bn in military equipment to the Saudis. Although the trip – which has so far included a colorful sword dance ceremony as well as Trump taking pains not to use the potentially offensive phrase “radical Islamic terrorism” – has gone smoothly for its first day, there are still eight more days of potential pitfalls. Trump is scheduled to go to Israel, the Vatican, Brussels and Sicily where he will meet with an array of world leaders including Nato allies as well as the Pope. During his insurgent presidential campaign, Trump repeatedly derided Nato and called Pope Francis “disgraceful” at a campaign stop in South Carolina. Caputo, who has close links with Roger Stone, Trump’s long-time and highly controversial political adviser, worked in Russia in the 1990s. Democratic congresswoman Jackie Speier had previously mentioned Caputo’s name in a March hearing before the House intelligence committee. In that hearing, where then-FBI director James Comey testified, Speier noted that Caputo briefly did public relations work for Gazprom and that he met his second wife in the Ukraine while serving as a consultant in that country’s 2007 parliamentary elections. The Guardian understands that, as a result of Speier’s comments about Caputo’s wife, the long-time consultant was likely to insist that any testimony before the committee be public. Caputo worked for Trump’s campaign from November 2015 to June 2016 when he resigned after publicly gloating over the firing of former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski. In the immediate aftermath of Lewandowski’s termination, he tweeted: “Ding dong the witch is dead.” Hours later, Caputo stepped down while expressing his regret for “too exuberant a reaction to this personnel move”. Ironically, a former top Clinton aide once cited Caputo as a validator for Russia’s role attempting to influence the election. On 25 July 2016, Brian Fallon, Clinton’s national press secretary cited a tweet from Caputo to note “Trump is pretending the Russians aren’t behind DNC hack, but his former top adviser just agreed they are.”


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Ukraine is making good on its debts with the European Union. This time its Naftogaz, arguably the country's most important company, paying off a $300 million loan it had with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) on Tuesday. Naftogaz used the funds between July and September, but the EBRD loan option remains open until next year. And Naftogaz said that it plans to keep using it, particularly for the cold weather months. “The EBRD loan facility is not only an affordable resource to buy gas for the heating season but also an important factor of Naftogaz reform," CEO Andriy Kobolyev said. EBRD is monitoring the implementation of new standards in reporting, transparency, environmental and social responsibility in Naftogaz as part of its loan terms. Ukraine used the last loan to buy 1.8 billion cubic meters of gas, most of it not Russian. All of the money found its way back into Europe, with Naftogaz contracting Swiss based Axpo Trading Czech state owned energy company CEZ; Engie of France; Eni Trading & Shipping from Italy; and German firms RWE Supply & Trading GmbH and Uniper Global Commodities all winning bids to supply and deliver gas to Naftogaz under the EBRD loan. Russia used to be the largest supplier of natural gas to Ukraine. But over the last couple of years, Ukraine has diversified away from its core supplier, Gazprom, over pricing disputes that have required international arbitration. Russia and Ukraine are currently going through a bitter divorce. Since the ousting of president Viktor Yanukovych, Ukraine has tried to follow in the footsteps of Poland by leaning towards Europe rather than its old partner. In retaliation, Russia took over the Crimean peninsula, which military observers say was a move by Vladimir Putin to secure its only warm water port should Ukraine join NATO. Later, ethnic Russians and Chechens, often backed by Russia's government, sought to isolate themselves from Kiev in eastern provinces known to be industrial hubs. The crisis has caused economic calamity in Ukraine and led to sanctions against Russia by the U.S. and Europe. For its part, Russia is also diversifying away from Ukraine as its main transit route into Europe. Gazprom is building a pipeline into Europe via Turkey with BOTAS Petroleum, and is still looking to build the Nord Stream II pipeline through the Baltics with major European partners like Shell Oil.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

In this brand new report you find 93 in-depth tables, charts and graphs all unavailable elsewhere. The 177 page report provides clear detailed insight into the global Small Scale LNG market. Discover the key drivers and challenges affecting the market. By ordering and reading our brand new report today you stay better informed and ready to act. 1) The report provides CAPEX forecasts and analyses for the small scale LNG market and the five main submarkets from 2017-2027: • Small Scale Regasification Forecast 2017-2027 • Small Scale Liquefaction Forecast 2017-2027 • LNG Bunkering Stations Forecast 2017-2027 • LNG Fuelling Stations Forecast 2017-2027 • LNG Satellite Stations Forecast 2017-2027 2) The report includes CAPEX forecasts and an analysis of the drivers and restraints of 6 key regional/national markets from 2017 to 2027, including submarket breakdowns for each: 3) The report provides insight into the level of development and existing small scale LNG infrastructure in every regional space 4) The analysis in the report is underpinned by our exclusive interview with leading expert. 5) The report concludes with the profiles of a selection of companies and technology providers operating in the market, and lists key companies involved within the respective small scale LNG submarkets. Who should read this report? • Who should read this report? • Anyone within the LNG industry • CEOs • COOs • Business development managers • Project and site managers • Suppliers • Investors • Contractors • Government agencies • Environmental Engineers/Technicians Visiongain's study is intended for anyone requiring commercial analyses for the Small Scale LNG market and leading companies. You find data, trends and predictions. Buy our report today Small Scale Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Market Forecast 2017-2027: Liquefaction, Regasification, Satellite Station, Bunkering & Fuelling Station and Small Scale LNG Plus Profiles of Top Companies. Avoid missing out by staying informed - get our report now. To request a report overview of this report please email Sara Peerun at sara.peerun@visiongain.com or call Tel: +44-(0)-20-7336-6100 Aarhus Havn Adpo AGA Gas AB Air Liquide Air Products and Chemicals Inc. (APCI) Albert Heijn Alpha Natural Resources Anhui Huaqiang Natural Gas Anthony Veder Apache APNG Barents NaturGass Bayernwerk AG Bechtel and Chart Energy & Chemicals BG Group Black & Veatch Blu LNG BOC Bomin Linde LNG BP Buffalo Marine Service Buquebus CCB - Gasnor CETS (CNOOC) Chart Industries, Inc. Cheniere Texas Chesapeake Energy Chevron China LNG Group Limited China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) Chinese Construction Bank (CCB) Chinese National Offshore Oil Corp (CNOOC) Chive Fuels Chuo Kaiun CH4 Energy Clean Energy Corp. CME Colony Energy Partners Conferenza GNL ConocoPhillips Conrad Shipyard Consol Energy Copenhagen Malmo Port COSCO Group Cryonorm BV Cryostar Group CSR Daiichi Dalian Inteh Group Danyang Dart Energy Deen Shipping DHL Bawtry DNV GL Donsotank / Jahre Marine AS Dresser Rand Dunkerque LNG DUON Elengy Enagas Encana Energigas Engie (GDF Suez) Eni ENN ENOSLNG Evergas Evol LNG Exmar ExxonMobil Fairbanks Natural Gas Fenosa Reganosa Ferus Finish Gas Association Fjord Line AS Flint Hills Resources Fluxys Fordonsgas Fortis BC Energy Fujian Energy Gas Natural GasEner SLR Gasnor Shell Gasrec Gasum Gasunie Gavle Hamn Gaz Métro LNG Gazprom GE-Energy GNF Golar LNG GoldEnergy GoldEnergy Commercializadora de Energia, S.A GoLNG INDONESIA Gyproc AS HAM Group Harvey Gulf Harvey Gulf International Marine Hawaiian Electric Company Herose Hess Corporation Hiroshima LNG Hogaki Zosen Hokkaido Gas Honeywell I.M. Skaugen InterStream Barging Itochu Jahre Marine Japan Exploration Co. Ltd (Japex) Japan Liquid Gas Jensen Maritime Jereh Group Jiangnan Shipyard Group JX Energy JX Nippon Oil & Energy Klapeidos Nafta Knutsen Kogas Kosan Crisplant Kunlun Energy Company Limited Linde Group Liquefied Natural Gas Limited Liqueline Lloyds Register LNG 24 LNG America LNG Europe B.V. LNG Hybrid LNG Silesia Manga LNG Marubeni MCGC MedoEnergi Meyer Werft GmbH Mitsui Monfort National Grid Naturgass New Times Energy New York City Department of Transportation Nihon Gas Ningbo Xinle Shipbuilding Group Noble Energy Norgas Carriers NYK Ohio Gas Company Okinawa EP Osaka Gas Oy AGA Ab Perbadanan/NYK Pertamina Perusahaan Gas Negara PetroChina Petronet PGNIG Plum Energy ONLG Polish Oil and Gas Co. Polski LNG Polski LNG - Polish Oil and Gas Co. Port of Antwerp - Exmar Portal Gas Group Preem Petroleum Corporation PT Perusahaan Listrik Negara Puget Sound Energy Reola Gaas Repsol Rolande LNG Rolls Royce Marine Royal Bodewes Royal Dutch Shell plc Saga Fjordbase Saibu Gas Sakaide LNG Salof Sendai Municipal Gas SGA: Swedish Gas Association Shaanxi Yanchang Petroleum Group Shell Shinwa Simon Loos Sinopec Skangas Skangass AS SOCAR South Korean Ministry of Trade Spectrum Spectrum LNG Stabilis Energy Statoil/AGA Stobart Group STX Offshore & Shipbuilding Swedegas Tenaska NG Fuels Tenaska NG Fuels - Waller Marine The Linde Group Toho Gas Tokyo Gas Total TOTE Travel Centers of America Tsurumi Sunmarine U.S. Maritime Administration United Shipbuilding Company Universal Shipbuilding Corporation Vanzetti Veka Deen LNG Veka Group Via Augusta Gas VICO Indonesia Vicuna Vopak Vopak - Gasunie Vos Logistics Waller Marine Wartsila Hamworthy Wuchang Shipbuilding Xilan Natural Gas Group To see a report overview please email Sara Peerun on sara.peerun@visiongain.com

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