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News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

This report studies Friction Welding Machine in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  Branson (Emerson)  KUKA  Thompson (KUKA)  ESAB  NITTO SEIKI  Forward Technology (Crest)  MTI  Sakae  Dukane  Cyril Bath  Gatwick  Baruffaldi  Daeyoung Ultrasonic  YUAN YU Industrial  Zhengchen  Changchun CNC Machine Tool  Longfei Welding Equipment  HWI  Yuyao City Biweekly  New Dimension Research  Bielomatik  Hornwell Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Friction Welding Machine in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like  North America  Europe  China  Japan  Southeast Asia  India  Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into  Type I  Type II  Type III Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Friction Welding Machine in each application, can be divided into  Application 1  Application 2  Application 3 Global Friction Welding Machine Market Research Report 2016  1 Friction Welding Machine Market Overview  1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Friction Welding Machine  1.2 Friction Welding Machine Segment by Type  1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Friction Welding Machine by Type in 2015  1.2.2 Type I  1.2.3 Type II  1.2.4 Type III  1.3 Friction Welding Machine Segment by Application  1.3.1 Friction Welding Machine Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015  1.3.2 Application 1  1.3.3 Application 2  1.3.4 Application 3  1.4 Friction Welding Machine Market by Region  1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Friction Welding Machine (2011-2021) 7 Global Friction Welding Machine Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis  7.1 Branson (Emerson)  7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.1.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.1.2.1 Type I  7.1.2.2 Type II  7.1.3 Branson (Emerson) Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.2 KUKA  7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.2.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.2.2.1 Type I  7.2.2.2 Type II  7.2.3 KUKA Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.3 Thompson (KUKA)  7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.3.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.3.2.1 Type I  7.3.2.2 Type II  7.3.3 Thompson (KUKA) Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.4 ESAB  7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.4.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.4.2.1 Type I  7.4.2.2 Type II  7.4.3 ESAB Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.5 NITTO SEIKI  7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.5.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.5.2.1 Type I  7.5.2.2 Type II  7.5.3 NITTO SEIKI Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.6 Forward Technology (Crest)  7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.6.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.6.2.1 Type I  7.6.2.2 Type II  7.6.3 Forward Technology (Crest) Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.7 MTI  7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.7.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.7.2.1 Type I  7.7.2.2 Type II  7.7.3 MTI Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.8 Sakae  7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.8.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.8.2.1 Type I  7.8.2.2 Type II  7.8.3 Sakae Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.9 Dukane  7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.9.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.9.2.1 Type I  7.9.2.2 Type II  7.9.3 Dukane Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.10 Cyril Bath  7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.10.2 Friction Welding Machine Product Type, Application and Specification  7.10.2.1 Type I  7.10.2.2 Type II  7.10.3 Cyril Bath Friction Welding Machine Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.11 Gatwick  7.12 Baruffaldi  7.13 Daeyoung Ultrasonic  7.14 YUAN YU Industrial  7.15 Zhengchen  7.16 Changchun CNC Machine Tool  7.17 Longfei Welding Equipment  7.18 HWI  7.19 Yuyao City Biweekly  7.20 New Dimension Research  7.21 Bielomatik  7.22 Hornwell


News Article | February 25, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

At 35,000 feet above the Atlantic, there is no free lunch - and certainly not for passengers who have only stumped up £69 for a flight on Norwegian. Some of the fares advertised this week to the US from the UK and Ireland are lower than the passenger taxes levied on the tickets. Is it too good to be true – and if not, how are Norwegian doing it? Alas, £69 fares are likely to prove elusive for most. On Thursday, Norwegian launched 10 new transatlantic routes – from Edinburgh, Belfast, Cork, Shannon and Dublin to destinations billed as New York, Boston and New England – and it was briefly possible to book for £69 out (and £60.80 back) from Edinburgh to New York in the summer months. But with taxes and charges costing the airline £146 per passenger, these were limited loss-leaders. By Thursday afternoon, Norwegian’s transatlantic fares from Ireland’s airports this summer were at least €270 (£228) one-way. And for those fares, a passenger would forego niceties such as a reserved seat, onboard food, or checked baggage. All of the those cost extra and a suitcase alone adds £80-100. Comparing routes out of Gatwick, from where Norwegian started undercutting UK long-haul competitors in 2014, the cheapest fares in June are typically £393 for a return. And that is usually on days when rivals such as British Airways or American, operating out of the same airport, are a touch over £500. Those rivals are offering as standard the kind of services – food and luggage, in particular – for which Norwegian demands a further £90-100 (if pre-booked), eradicating most of the difference. Add in those, and on some dates, Virgin Atlantic from Heathrow would work out cheaper. The big difference between the Gatwick departures and the upcoming “£69” hops from Scotland and Ireland is where passengers land in the US. In a move reminiscent of Ryanair’s notorious Frankfurt (Hahn) gambit – which involved the airline flying to an old military base 75 miles from the German hub – Norwegian will be offloading its New York passengers at Stewart international, an airport that has not hitherto troubled many international travellers. Its terminal building, with the red brick and mock turrets that resemble an out-of-town Tesco supermarket, includes a newsstand and a small gift shop, while the outskirts of New York city itself are a good 90-minute drive away. Similar distances link Providence and Bradley airports to Boston and New England’s usual points of interest, but Norwegian’s chief executive, Bjørn Kjos, is stout in his defence of airports with no other connections to Europe. “Of course secondary airports will be much cheaper. It’s very expensive to fly into a Newark or a JFK,” he told the Guardian. “Most passengers don’t care where they land. And passengers will find it’s very convenient to fly into these airports because there’s no queue at immigration, no problems. You’re going to have a second gin and tonic before you see the other passengers get out of immigration from JFK.” As well as benefitting from significantly lower landing charges at its transatlantic destinations, Norwegian uses a young fleet of fuel-efficient planes. It launched its Gatwick-US routes using Boeing’s 787 Dreamliners, which claim to deliver fuel savings of 20-25% compared with similar long-haul planes – a number that is significant given fuel remains the biggest single operating cost for any airline. Norwegian packs on more seats with fewer cabins, although it does have a premium economy class on its 787, which Kjos said was attracting more and more business passengers (at fares of around £900 for a return from London): “They know the product, they get a good bargain. We have hit the right spot right there.” The Irish routes will operate with an even smaller plane, the Boeing 737 MAX, which has a longer range and more seats than existing single-aisle aircraft. Its range means Norwegian can operate to the US eastern seaboard on a flight with a similar feel to European short-haul journeys, in a single economy cabin. “I don’t see anything really different about flying long-haul or short-haul,” said Kjos. “Now with the new aircraft types we are able to fill a gap that wasn’t even there before – flying direct to the US from small cities that didn’t have the possibility.” He added: “I think we will shape the industry. If you call it disruption it will be disruption. EasyJet and Ryanair created a new way of travelling in Europe. Now we will do that with low-cost and long haul.” Norwegian started as a small regional airline before turning into a low-cost carrier that operated across Scandinavia. Its growth has surged throughout Europe since 2012, when it opened its Gatwick base and placed a large order for new fuel-efficient Boeing and Airbus planes. Only easyJet and BA are bigger at Gatwick, while Norwegian is now overtaking old rival SAS – the pan-Scandinavian carrier that once dominated its home market – to become Europe’s eighth biggest airline, carrying 30 million passengers a year compared with 12 million just five years ago. But questions still linger over the business model for some: so far, profits have been slim, with the £109m Norwegian made last year its best to date, by some way. Aviation analyst John Strickland said that while the new routes would attract traffic and be popular in the summer months, it was less clear how many could remain profitable and sustainable in the long-term. There was also the threat of a strong competitive response. Willie Walsh, chief executive of IAG, owner of BA and Aer Lingus, dismissed the fares as “gimmicks”, and flagged up how rapidly they had sold out. However, Walsh added: “I’m a great fan of Bjorn Kjos.” Walsh said Aer Lingus, and even possibly BA, could imitate Norwegian’s “unbundled” fares, without meals and bags included, if consumers bought them. Meanwhile, Kjos has his eyes on other markets: South America is in his sights, and he says Africa could follow. But Strickland remains sceptical of Norwegian’s global ambitions, warning: “The more you broaden, the more you bring in multiple challenges and complexities and it’s going to take some very attentive management to keep it all in place.” Kjos, 70, the former fighter pilot and paratrooper, who expanded Norwegian from a small upstart, may himself not be around to run the airline for ever. “I should have a natural retirement plan but I haven’t had time to think about that,” he said, laughing.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Restorative Therapies will be featuring live demonstrations of their new Xcite FES system, and experts will be on hand at booth number 442 to discuss the clinical applications. Xcite FES Clinical Station is a portable, multi-channel FES therapy system. Easy to use pre-programmed activity libraries for upper extremity, lower extremity and general activities deliver sequenced stimulation enabling a patient's weak or paralyzed muscles to move through dynamic movement patterns. Xcite assists patients to perform task specific, strengthening and gross motor activities using up to 12 channels of stimulation. The on screen photo guide for electrode placement facilitates easy set up. An avatar demonstrates each activity and there are chimes to indicate transitions providing visual and auditory cues that assist your patient with timing and awareness of movements. "Repetitive practice of task specific, strengthening and gross motor activities have long been a cornerstone of PT and OT programs for patients with neurological impairments or muscle weakness," says Wendy Warfield, MSHA, OTR/L, Clinical Education Manager of Restorative Therapies. "Xcite is designed to be easily integrated into these traditional programs. Xcite enhances the impact of the traditional therapeutic activities that support neuromuscular reeducation." “There is nothing else on the market that compares to Xcite…It is great to finally have a device that allows you to work on precise motor control and dexterity while providing FES…Xcite’s ability to control each movement channel individually allows you to facilitate more accurate and functional movement patterns for greater recovery,” said Jenny Suggit, MS OTR/L, CLT, Occupational Therapist, Centre Manager, Neurokinex-Gatwick, UK. Also on display will be RT300 supine. RT300 supine allows people to leg or arm cycle while in bed. Cycling from bed can be an important component in an Early Mobility program. Early Mobility programs are being adopted by a growing number of Intensive Care Units with the goal of enhancing patient outcomes and reducing lengths of stay. About Restorative Therapies Restorative Therapies mission is to help people with a neurological impairment or in critical care achieve their full recovery potential. Restorative Therapies is one of the first companies to target activity-based physical therapy and Functional Electrical Stimulation as a rehabilitation therapy for immobility associated with paralysis such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury or for patients in critical care. Restorative Therapies is a privately held company headquartered in Baltimore. To learn more about Restorative Therapies please visit us at http://www.restorative-therapies.com


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

The transport secretary, Chris Grayling, has offered to meet the RMT union if it suspends its industrial action in its dispute with Southern rail, as commuters on the troubled network suffered further disruption with an overtime ban by drivers starting alongside a fresh strike by conductors . Members of the RMT are on strike for three days, while industrial action by Aslef members, including the refusal to work additional shifts, will run indefinitely. Southern, which has admitted to parliament that it does not have enough drivers to operate its timetable, has told customers it expects services “to be severely disrupted on every day from Tuesday 6 December until further notice”. The RMT general secretary, Mick Cash, said his union had been seeking talks with Grayling since he became secretary of state in June. “He has refused to meet us because we are taking industrial action,” Cash told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. Asked if he would agree to suspend the strike if Grayling offered to meet the union, Cash said: “If he says he wants to meet us, I will certainly put that suggestion back to our executive, yes.” Within an hour, Grayling said he would meet the union if it suspended strikes. “Call it off and we will work together for the future of the railways,” he told Today. But he made it clear that he sided with the company in the dispute and said it would be wrong for him to interfere in the negotiations. Grayling said: “I don’t think it is right and proper for me to insert myself into a negotiation between a private company and a trade union over a strike I think is politically motivated.” Southern is changing the role of conductors and bringing in more driver-only operated trains, which unions argue threatens safety as well as jobs. Grayling said the strike was unnecessary. He said: “I am very happy to meet the unions ... They don’t have to carry out this action. Nobody is losing their job, nobody is losing any money. It is perfectly safe as judged by the independent rail inspectorate. There is no reason for this strike to be happening.” Cash, however, took further aim at Grayling, who has been announcing separate proposals to reform how railways are run. The RMT general secretary said: “Instead of parading around the newsrooms with his lethal scheme to give outfits like Southern a chance to wreck rail infrastructure, ‎as well as our train operations, the transport secretary should be in a room with the unions and [Southern] sorting out the current shambles.” The long-standing dispute has reached the point where even a group of Church of England bishops has attempted to intervene. In a letter, the bishops in Sussex called for an end to the “circle of blame”, saying the dispute was threatening the economic health and development of communities. The church leaders said those responsible for the trains had a “moral duty to alleviate the damage that the disruption is causing”. The RMT said it was willing to attend any talks brokered by the bishops. The RMT said the action that started on Tuesday was “rock solid”. The train company said there was major disruption to trains on the mainline to Brighton and to Redhill, and some disruption to the Gatwick Express, while some branch lines were partially closed. Southern is hoping to run about 50% of scheduled trains this week, but has warned of “severe and significant disruption” and that “stations will be incredibly busy”. It has advised customers to avoid travelling if possible. Southern does not expect to run any trains on three days next week when drivers are planning to strike. “If passengers can make alternative travel arrangements they should, and if they don’t have to travel they shouldn’t,” Southern said. Southern’s owner, Govia Thameslink Railway, has launched legal action to block Aslef’s strike, and a hearing is due at the high court in London on Wednesday. More strikes by the RMT, along with the overtime ban, are planned in the run-up to Christmas and over the new year. A week-long strike by drivers will halt Southern operations again in January.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

News solutions for biometrics, bag drop and New ADA-compliant kiosk At PTE 2017 in Amsterdam from 14 to 16 March, Materna will present its complete end-to-end passenger journey, from home to destination, and show how seamless travel is a real benefit for passengers. To accelerate the whole passenger handling process, Materna has added biometrics to their passenger touch point solutions to take passengers through the complete integrated process with a single token ID. You will find us at stand 5040. Materna has now integrated biometrics within the passenger journey: While checking-in at home using a mobile app, or later at the airport-kiosk, a biometric photo of the passenger is taken. This information is stored as a biometric token which enables the passenger to be recognized at every point along their journey from then on. This biometric face enrollment is carried out as a background process that saves a lot of time, accelerates the whole passenger journey and avoids unnecessary stops for passengers as, for example, they are then identified automatically at the pre-security or boarding gates. For this biometrics identification process to work efficiently, it is necessary to integrate all the steps along the passenger journey from check-in to boarding. Visitors at stand 5040 can experience the whole range of self-bag-drop solutions designed for one- or two-step bag drop processes, all based on intuitive graphical user guidance. The solutions are CUSS- and CUWS-compliant. Materna, as the leading supplier for self-bag-drop, offers a range of solutions to airports and airlines based on retrofit or kiosk models of different sizes. Each kiosk can handle up to 4,000 boarding passes and up to 1,200 bag tags before they need to be refilled. All Materna standard bag drop solutions already include multi-airline payment options and linerless bag tag printing. The customer-proven solution at London Gatwick, which has the world´s largest self-bag-drop installation, will be presented by Gavin Jackson, Project Leader at Gatwick, in a live talk at the conference on 16 March, and visitors can meet him in person at the Materna booth. Materna will also be showcasing their brand-new ADA-compliant kiosk for the first time at this year's PTE in Amsterdam. This new kiosk is much lower than the well-known Materna standard kiosk. It is compliant to the American Disabilities Act (ADA) Standards for Accessible Design published by the US Department of Justice in September 2010. These standards state that all electronic and information technology must be accessible to people with disabilities e.g. wheelchair users and people with visual handicaps. The new kiosk is equipped with additional controls, e.g. a large panel with hieroglyphic buttons. This press release as well as picture material you will find here: Materna is one of the leading IT consulting companies in the information and communications technology sector, employing around 1.700 staff members throughout Europe and achieving revenues of EUR 210 million in 2015. Materna is a full service provider, delivering a complete range of services for the premium segment: from consultation and implementation through to operation and cloud services for large enterprises and the public sector. Under the brand Materna ips (Integrated Passenger Services) and as one of the worldwide most famous suppliers for airports and airlines, Materna offers solutions for automated passenger handling at airports. In addition to the European market, Materna focusses with its Integrated Passenger Services portfolio market on the North-American market having its own subsidiary in Orlando, Florida. Materna has also a focus on the Asian market. For more details, please contact:


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Airports Direct Services (ADS) UK http://www.airportsdirectservices.co.uk announced today they would donate £1 of all their sales to one charity per day and the given charity can use as the wishes. Airports Direct Services (ADS) UK, the Director says they’ve always admired the work charities do helping in different problem areas of life and now will be giving £1 per sale per day to different charity to be used as the given charity wishes. He said they’re thrilled to be able to give to organisations that has given so much and done so much good over the years. He said anyone who purchases Airports Direct Services (ADS) UK services will now know not only do they get the best Services from East Dulwich, Dulwich, Bromley, Lewisham, and most of South, West and Central London as the capitals premier minicab airport transfer specialist covering Heathrow, Gatwick, Luton, City, Stansted and now Southend Airport. Not only do they provide an Airport to Hotel/Home service, like the London Black Taxis, but also operate an inter-airport shuttle for those spontaneous connecting flights and trains, they’ll also be helping their chosen charities. Airports Direct Services (ADS) UK was founded over one decade ago and serves as Premier minicab airport transfer specialist. It is known that their fares are cheaper than the Gatwick Airport Taxis and the Heathrow Airport Taxis.. They can also cater for a bespoke service for tourists and groups wishing to see the Sights of London and its attractions, all at very competitive rates, Other services include; Seaports, Train stations, Weddings and trips to Corporate events and Outings. If you are visiting London for the first time or indeed a regular visitor, you can email your requirements 24/7 or speak to an adviser with your inquiry personally.http://www.airportsdirectservices.co.uk For more information, please visit http://www.airportsdirectservices.co.uk/


News Article | February 14, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

British Airways cabin crew have announced four more days of strikes, to start on 22 February, as a dispute over pay continues. About 2,900 crew members in BA’s mixed fleet belonging to the Unite union will stage industrial action for four days starting next Wednesday. The union says it aims to “pile on the pressure” on the airline, which it accuses of paying poverty wages to cabin crew. The strike is in addition to four days of strikes due to start on Friday. Since the start of the year there have been 11 days of strike action, including six days last week. But executives last week ruled out further negotiations. Basic pay in the mixed fleet, which all new recruits to BA join, starts at around £12,000, though the airline says crew earn a minimum of £21,000 after allowances and bonuses. Unite says cabin crew earn £16,000 a year on average. Unite says BA has been forced to “wet lease” aircraft from other airlines to cover for the striking staff and estimates that this is costing the airline between £2,000 and £3,000 an hour. Unite regional officer Matt Smith said: “Our estimates put the amount of money British Airways has spent on defending the dispute and poverty pay at £1m. “This is money which the airline has taken a conscious decision to give to other airlines rather than addressing pay levels which are forcing hardworking mixed fleet cabin crew into financial hardship.” He urged BA to attend arbitration talks with the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas). BA said the action would not disrupt passengers’ journeys. During this weekend’s strike, all flights to and from London Gatwick and City airports would operate as normal, as would the vast majority of flights from Heathrow, a spokesman said. The airline would be “merging a very small number of flights” – around 1% of flights planned, the spokesman said. “We will publish more details over the weekend in relation to further strikes called by Mixed Fleet Unite for 22-25 February, but as in previous strikes all customers will fly to their destinations,” the spokesman said. During last week’s strike BA cancelled 34 flights due to strike action, but the airline said all passengers had reached their destination. More than 9,000 cabin crew belonging to a different Unite branch had voted to accept the pay deal this week, according to a BA statement. Last week Willie Walsh, chief executive of BA’s parent company, IAG, said: “The offer’s on the table. There are no negotiations. The strikes have had no effect, the passengers are flying and flights are operating. So I’d say this is completely futile action on the part of the union. The offer we’ve made is a fair offer.”


News Article | July 2, 2014
Site: www.theguardian.com

The first low-cost transatlantic flights since Freddie Laker’s doomed Skytrain enterprise have left Gatwick airport for Los Angeles, a development that Gatwick describes a “game-changer” in the debate over where to build a new runway in London. As well as the twice-weekly service to LA, Norwegian will operate two flights a week to Fort Lauderdale, where the majority of the cabin crew will be based, while a London-New York service has its first flight on Thursday. The new operation from Norwegian Air Shuttle has attracted controversy, particularly in the United States, for taking advantage of differing international legislation to circumvent labour costs and buy aircraft on more favourable terms than competitors. Consumers will also struggle to find a seat at the advertised cheapest fares, on the relatively few long-haul services that Norwegian runs. Only seven of its 95 planes are capable of transatlantic flights. Norwegian will run a service pitched somewhere between the low-cost European model and traditional transatlantic carriers, with seat-back entertainment included but food and luggage incurring extra charges. The airline’s chief executive, Bjørn Kos, said: “At Norwegian, we believe that everyone should be able to afford to fly. In order to compete in the global airline industry you need to adapt to changes and keep a constant focus on cost. “Norwegian has a low-cost model, meaning a lean administration, brand new and fuel-efficient aircraft and efficient operations. We fly direct routes with high passenger demand and choose centrally located airports such at Gatwick that share our mindset.” Kos says costs have been driven down by the fuel efficiency of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner plane. The airline, which already operates similar services between Thailand, Scandinavia and the US, has come under fire in Norway and elsewhere for employing crew in Bangkok on Singaporean contracts. Unions have accused Norwegian of undermining labour conventions, with the ITF likening its pursuit of operating licences to the shipping practice of registering vessels under flags of convenience. Norwegian said it established its long-haul company in Dublin for its air traffic rights as an EU nation and to maintain export guarantees to finance its fleet orders, and that the airline fully complies with European safety standards. Pilots union Balpa said concerns remained, although a ruling in the US has prevented Norwegian from using pilots from Bangkok on the new Gatwick routes. Balpa said: “The use of European pilots on this new route will reassure passengers who may otherwise have been concerned about an airline associated with a particular country by name which is in fact cherry-picking another country to oversee its safety standards and yet another to employ its pilots.” For Gatwick, however, the Norwegian long-haul launch is a milestone in its battle for expansion. Its chief executive, Stewart Wingate, said: “A low-cost carrier flying to the Big Apple for a small price shows how fast aviation is changing and highlights one of a series of future trends that will have a huge bearing on the UK’s runways debate.” The airport unveiled a new report by independent aviation consultant Chris Tarry, which set out how the latest generation of aircraft could affect London airport expansion, with a fuel economy, size and range that lowers the need for connecting passengers and opens up the development of low-cost long-haul services. Tarry’s report says Gulf expansion would also lower the demand for connections in a London hub, but he believes that traffic will grow due to the strength of the capital as a destination in its own right. Wingate added: “As this new report outlines, it is the airlines’ fleet plans and order books of today that hold the key to the expansion needs of tomorrow. New generation aircraft and other key trends will lead to a reduction in ‘hub’ connecting traffic, an increase in point-to-point services and the continued growth of low-cost carriers, all of which are cornerstones of Gatwick’s case for a second runway.” He added: “Heathrow’s plans are yesterday’s solution to tomorrow’s problem and that only expansion of Gatwick can meet the challenges and demands of the future.”


News Article | September 29, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

British Airways economy class passengers on short-haul flights will soon have to pay for sandwiches supplied by Marks & Spencer if they want a meal in mid-air. The airline has signed a deal with M&S that will see it replace free meals on flights of less than five hours and join no-frills rivals such as Ryanair and easyJet in charging for sandwiches, crisps and drinks. Previously, economy class passengers could expect a small snack, such as a bacon sandwich, and a complimentary drink. Passengers in Club Europe – the airline’s short-haul business class service – will continue to enjoy a complimentary menu, which is being improved and revamped. The decision to jettison free food from economy class comes six months after Alex Cruz took over as British Airways chief executive, having previously run its low-cost Spanish sister airline Vueling. Cruz said the change was a response to passengers clamouring for greater choice of upmarket snacks. “We know our customers expect a great experience with British Airways,” he said. “They’ve told us we are experts in flying and service, but when it comes to catering on short-haul flights, they want to choose from a wider range of premium products.” The M&S menu includes some of the retailer’s best-known offerings such as the Aberdeen Angus beef and red onion chutney bloomer and packets of Percy Pig sweets. Aviation analyst Alex Macheras said it was unlikely BA would use the money it saved on food to cut ticket prices. “Unfortunately you have to be realistic. This sandwich is basically nothing on the ticket price, so what will disappear from the price? Nothing.” He backed BA’s decision to replace free meals with a wider choice offered at a cost. “Some people are in uproar, asking how BA can ditch food on short haul, but unless you were on club or business class, you were only getting half a sandwich and one drink. “I’ve always thought I’d much rather have the option to pay for quality rather than accept free food that is just one mouthful.” BA released a sample menu comparing its prices favourably with the prices charged by easyJet, Ryanair and Norwegian. A sample meal of the Aberdeen Angus bloomer, a packet of crisps and a bottle of water will cost £7.55, rising to £10.25 if the water is replaced with a quarter bottle of wine. Cruz said the menu, which will change with the seasons, “breaks the mould and sets a new standard in short-haul catering”. He added that anyone with the airline’s Avios points, earned as a member of BA’s executive club group, would be able to use them to pay for meals. The new menu will start from 11 January next year for passengers flying from Heathrow and Gatwick, while anyone departing from Stansted or London City will still get a snack free of charge until summer 2017. Changes to meals are part of a series of adjustments to BA’s short-haul services, including new interiors and a simplification of its fare structure to just three options. Here is what BA and M&S will be offering economy class flyers:


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Hubio announces that 1ST CENTRAL Insurance has extended its commitment to Hubio’s claims platform, ICE Claims, with a new agreement. 1ST CENTRAL has partnered with Hubio since 2008 to provide ICE Claims in support of its end to end claims operations from day one. 1ST CENTRAL had a clear objective to remove the need for paper files and to enable the customer to be dealt with quickly and efficiently. ICE Claims and ICE Intelligence were successfully implemented and Hubio has continued to support their business with their ongoing goals of increased efficiency, better customer communication and overall cost management. [1ST CENTRAL has implemented 9 ICE upgrades since its go-live, with the most recent being in September 2016.] Speaking of its recent upgrade to ICE Claims, Glen Marr, Claims and Counter Fraud Director at 1ST CENTRAL commented: “I want to compliment Hubio upon how well our most recent ICE upgrade was delivered. It once again demonstrated how everyone in both organisations works well together across our projects. We continue to take upgrades from Hubio year on year as new functionality comes into the application that we can benefit from.” In 2014, 1ST CENTRAL were the first adopter of ICE Claims integration with the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) portal for personal injury claims, benefiting from automated workflows, giving greater accuracy, eliminating manual lookups and rekeying of claims details in support of the quick turnaround needed for these claims. The upgrade has allowed 1ST CENTRAL to take advantage of Hubio’s ongoing investment in its award-winning platform. Lynette Slater, Client Services Director at Hubio said: “We have a longstanding relationship with 1ST CENTRAL, and are delighted that they have confirmed their ongoing commitment to working with Hubio with this agreement. ICE Claims gives 1ST CENTRAL the tools to achieve the automation and efficiencies needed in today’s high expectation, high availability environment. We look forward to working further with 1ST CENTRAL to leverage the benefits of Hubio’s technology.” About Hubio Hubio provides integrated solutions to help organisations in the insurance and automotive sectors increase efficiency, reduce claims, build customer engagement and enable usage-based personalisation. Through the innovative use of telematics, usage-based insurance (UBI), analytics, claims management software, mobile, gamification, and other enterprise technologies, Hubio is bringing new levels of data-driven insights to the insurance and automotive industries, while challenging and redefining established business models. Hubio was formed to be a best-in-class solutions provider, bringing together several industry-leading technology and service businesses. As one organisation, we are uniquely placed to deliver and support true end-to-end solutions. Hubio is part of Watchstone Group plc, able to draw on the expertise, resources and solutions of other innovative group companies in a diverse range of sectors. For more information, please visit http://www.hubio.com. 1ST CENTRAL is an online car insurer founded by Ken Acott, Pat Tilley, Peter Creed and Mike Leonard. 1ST CENTRAL has enjoyed incredible growth since its launch in 2008, saving more than two million UK policyholders money on their car insurance and servicing more than £0.5bn of premium in its first five years of trading. 1ST CENTRAL recently won the 2016 Business Matters Large Business award, and provides employment for 600 members of staff. 1ST CENTRAL is committed to nurturing growth and investing in its employees and has been awarded Employer of the Year two years in a row in 2014 and 2015 and the Gatwick Diamond Business awards, as well as the Developing People for Business Success award in 2016. In February 2015 1ST CENTRAL was also awarded the 5 Star Rating from the independent financial research company Defaqto. 1ST CENTRAL is a trading name used by the First Central Group companies. 1ST CENTRAL is now firmly established as one of the top providers of car insurance in the UK motor aggregator market and is ready to move into its next phase of sustained growth and expansion. 1ST CENTRAL is a proud sponsor of Sussex County Cricket Club, and of the road safety awareness charity, Brake. For more information, please visit http://www.1stcentralinsurance.com/who-we-are

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