Gastroenterology and NutritionMedical University of LodzLodzPoland

Gastroenterology and NutritionMedical University of LodzLodzPoland


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Krogulska A.,Gastroenterology and NutritionMedical University of LodzLodzPoland | Dynowski J.,Gastroenterology and NutritionMedical University of LodzLodzPoland | Jedrzejczyk M.,Gastroenterology and NutritionMedical University of LodzLodzPoland | Sardecka I.,Gastroenterology and NutritionMedical University of LodzLodzPoland | And 2 more authors.
Pediatric Pulmonology | Year: 2016

Background and Objective: Despite the growing evidence of a possible link between asthma and food allergy (FA), so far, the involvement of food in inducing respiratory symptoms has not been fully evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of food allergens on respiratory symptoms and bronchial reactivity (BHR) in schoolchildren with asthma. Methods: The initial study group consisted of 362 children with asthma. In the end, 22 children with concomitant FA, and 18 without FA, were selected to participate in the study. Spirometry and Methacholine Inhalation Challenge (MIC) were conducted prior to and after the completion of a double blind placebo control food challenge (DBPCFC). Results: The food-induced asthmatic reactions were observed in nine (2.5%) out of all 362 children with asthma. Mean FEV1 prior to and after allergen or placebo challenge did not differ between the groups studied. Increase of BHR after DBPCFC was seen in 17 (4.7%) children with asthma. The mean PC20 value in children with FA was 1.41±1.12mg/ml prior to the allergen challenge and 0.86±0.71mg/ml (P=0.002) after the test, whereas these values were 1.93±1.68mg/ml and 2.02±1.75mg/ml, respectively, in children without FA (P>0.05). Significant differences were noted after the allergen provocation in children with FA as compared to children without FA (P=0.007). Conclusions: Although food allergens are a rare trigger of food-induced asthmatic reactions in schoolchildren with asthma, they could enhance BHR, despite a lack of evident clinical respiratory signs and decreased in FEV1 values after food challenge. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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