Gastroenterology and Liver Services

South West, Australia

Gastroenterology and Liver Services

South West, Australia

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Koo J.H.,Gastroenterology and Liver Services | Koo J.H.,University of New South Wales | Arasaratnam M.M.,University of New South Wales | Liu K.,Gastroenterology and Liver Services | And 6 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology | Year: 2010

Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening improves survival and its success depends on the participation of the at-risk population. Few studies have adequately assessed screening knowledge, perception and participation according to birthplace. This study assesses the knowledge and perception of CRC in an ethnically diverse population, and evaluates the association with screening participation and intention. Identification of specific predictors of screening may aid the development of interventions to improve overall CRC screening. Methods: An interview-based survey, conducted on subjects aged 30-70 years, assessed knowledge and perception towards CRC and screening tests. Primary endpoints were screening participation and intent. Statistical methods used were Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and logistic regression. Results: A total of 543 subjects (43% males, 53% Australian-born (AB), 63% aged 50 years and above) were recruited. Compared with AB, non-Australian-born (NAB) respondents had poorer knowledge, and NAB background predicted for poorer knowledge independent of sex, education, media and familiarity with CRC patient. Compared with AB respondents aged 50 years and above, NAB respondents had lower screening participation (17.4% vs. 31.8%; P= 0.01), lesser intention (75.8% vs. 90.5%; P< 0.001), and had received fewer doctors' screening recommendations (16.5% vs. 27.1%; P= 0.04). In multivariate analysis, doctors' recommendation, media and improved perception independently predicted screening participation; knowledge and media exposure predicted intent. Conclusions: The knowledge of CRC and screening is significantly poorer in the immigrant population. Knowledge predicts for greater screening intent. Therefore, implementing language- and culture-specific educational programs involving medical practitioners and media are necessary to improve CRC screening participation rates. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Koo J.H.,Gastroenterology and Liver Services | Koo J.H.,University of New South Wales | You M.Y.,University of New South Wales | Liu K.,Gastroenterology and Liver Services | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (Australia) | Year: 2012

Background and Aim: Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening improves survival and requires appropriate recommendation by general practitioners (GPs). Screening practises may be influenced by barriers related to ethnicity and training. Methods: A mail survey assessed GPs' practises and the barriers towards CRC screening. The association of screening practises and demography, including GP ethnicity, medical training and practise characteristics, were evaluated. Results: Of 212 GPs (median age 54years, 73% men, 27% Caucasian, 38% foreign graduates), 87% agreed that fecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening improved survival in the average-risk patient. Considerable variations existed in the starting age (40-49years: 31%; 50years: 65%) and frequency (1-2years: 77%; 3-5years: 22%) of screening. FOBT was used for indications other than screening: anemia (59%), altered bowel habits (54%), abdominal pain (24%), and rectal bleeding (23%), and these were significantly more frequent in Asian GPs independent of medical training. GPs were less likely to recommend screening to immigrants, and most reported that immigrants were less likely to participate. More Asian and Middle Eastern GPs reported a major barrier with FOBT inaccuracy compared with Caucasian GPs (22% vs 9%, P=0.03; and 27% vs 9%, P=0.03, respectively). Conclusions: Considerable differences existed in GPs' CRC screening practises. Indications for use of FOBT and the subsequent investigation of a positive FOBT also varied according to GPs' ethnicity, independent of medical training. Patient's ethnicity and associated language and cultural barriers may affect screening uptake, which may negatively affect the health of immigrants. Resources and culture-specific interventions are recommended to improve overall screening participation. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

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