Gas Turbine Research Establishment

Bangalore, India

Gas Turbine Research Establishment

Bangalore, India

Gas Turbine Research Establishment is a laboratory of the Defence Research and Development Organisation . Located in Bangalore, its primary function is research and development of aero gas-turbines for military aircraft. As a spin-off effect, GTRE has been developing marine gas-turbines also. Wikipedia.


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Barad S.G.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment | Giridhar R.K.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment
Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing | Year: 2012

Traditionally independent diagnostics methods were employed for health monitoring of system. These exhibited an overall satisfactory performance, but with a limited effectiveness range. A discipline that has emerged in recent years is that of an information (or data) fusion, which allows interweaving of different methods with different effectiveness ranges, to produce a wider and more reliable coverage of diagnosis. It is a multidisciplinary domain wherein, data from the various domain is blended together to arrive at a more reliable monitoring. The present paper brings out a Neural Network (NN) based approach for executing this task of combined health monitoring viz. mechanical and performance, with an example case study pertaining to a developmental power turbine. The various parameters used along with the trending methodologies both for steady state and transient operations are brought out. In addition, the influences of various parameters that can lead to deviations in the response are also discussed. The whole process of executing this task is put forward in a rather simple manner. The results accrued have been well corroborated with the findings on dismantling of the turbine. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Karthikeyan S.,Annamalai University | Balasubramanian V.,Annamalai University | Rajendran R.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment
Ceramics International | Year: 2014

Plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating has been considered to be a good protective coating material for high-temperature applications on account of its superior properties and life cycle costs. However, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have engineering reliability problems in tailoring the microstructure and mechanical properties towards achieving both prime reliance and manufacturing reproducibility. In this work, empirical relationships were developed to estimate TBCs performance characteristics (porosity and microhardness) by incorporating independently controllable atmospheric plasma spray operational parameters (input power, standoff distance and powder feed rate) using the response surface methodology (RSM). A central composite rotatable design with three factors and five levels was chosen to minimize the number of experimental conditions. Within the scope of the design space, the input power and the standoff distance appeared to be the most significant two parameters affecting the coating quality characteristics among the three investigated process parameters. Further, correlating the spray parameters with coating properties enables the identification of characteristics regime to achieve desired quality of YSZ coatings. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Techna Group S.r.l.


Jettappa R.R.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment
Proceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo | Year: 2010

This paper considers a rotating gas turbine engine disk. The governing equations lead to a non-linear, second order equation with thickness h as parameter. 'Thin disk' assumption is made, implying plane stress conditions. In the present study, starting from the equations of equilibrium and compatibility, the author proposes the new approach of Pseudo Material Density. By introducing a pseudo material density, the problem is reduced to the Flat Disk Equation that can be solved easily. Introduction of pseudo density, however, throws up an additional equation - a fourth one - relating the pseudo density, actual density and the thickness parameter. The equation is solved to find the shape of the disk in terms of the actual density. This procedure allows modeling of the non-uniform profile disk as a disk with flat profile facilitating easier analysis. An unexpected, but important result that emerges from the present study pertains to the proof testing of rotating disks. It is shown that it is now possible to replace the external blade loading exactly with a radial extension of the disk itself. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.


Mahobia G.S.,Indian Institute of Technology BHU Varanasi | Paulose N.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment | Singh V.,Indian Institute of Technology BHU Varanasi
Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance | Year: 2013

This investigation was undertaken to evaluate oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of the Fe-Ni-based superalloy IN718, at 550 and 650 C, to explore its performance as turbine engine components under marine environment. Uncoated and different salt-coated samples (100 wt.% NaCl, 75 wt.% Na2SO 4 + 25 wt.% NaCl, and 90 wt.% Na2SO4 + 5 wt.% NaCl + 5 wt.% V2O5) were exposed in air at 550 and 650 C under cyclic heating and cooling for 100 h. Weight gain was studied for both uncoated and salt-coated samples. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron dispersive spectroscopy were used to characterize the oxidation and corrosion products. A possible mechanism of corrosion, based on the corrosion compounds, is discussed. The variation in weight gain with time showed a parabolic growth of oxides. Coating with NaCl was found to be detrimental both at 550 C as well as 650 C. On the other hand, the salt mixture of NaCl and Na2SO4 had no effect at 550 C; however, it was detrimental at higher temperature of 650 C. Coatings of salt mixture of Na 2SO4, NaCl, and V2O5 caused very slow oxidation at both the temperatures. Increase in thickness of salt coating was observed to enhance the rate of hot corrosion. Among the three types of salt coatings, the coating of NaCl was found to be most damaging both at 550 and 650 C. © 2013 ASM International.


Sahu J.K.,Indian National Metallurgical Laboratory | Gupta R.K.,Indian National Metallurgical Laboratory | Swaminathan J.,Indian National Metallurgical Laboratory | Paulose N.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment | Mannan S.L.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment
International Journal of Fatigue | Year: 2013

The influence of hot corrosion on low cycle fatigue behavior is studied by conducting fatigue tests at 800°C in air on bare and salt-coated (90%Na 2SO4 + 10%NaCl) specimens. This was followed by extensive scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examinations. Significant reduction in fatigue life is observed across all values of Δεt/2 for the salt-coated specimens in comparison with bare specimens. SEM examination reveals that the fused salt mixture sporadically removes the protective chromium oxide layer and exposes the substrate. Subsequent SEM analysis reveals that severe grain boundary oxidation leads to grain boundary cracking and provides numerous sites for fatigue crack nucleation and growth. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Suryakumar S.,Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad | Karunakaran K.P.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Bernard A.,École Centrale Nantes | Chandrasekhar U.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment | And 2 more authors.
CAD Computer Aided Design | Year: 2011

Hybrid Layered Manufacturing is a Rapid Manufacturing process in which the metallic object is built in layers using weld deposition. Each layer built through overlapping beads is face milled to remove the scales and scallops and ensure Z-accuracy. The formations of single beads and overlapping multiple beads are modeled in this paper. While the individual bead's geometry is influenced by the size of the filler wire and the speeds of the wire and torch, the step over increment between the consecutive beads additionally comes into the picture for the multiple bead deposition. These models were validated experimentally. They are useful not only to predict the bead's shape but also to optimize the three process parameters. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Rajendran R.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment
Engineering Failure Analysis | Year: 2012

The components of a gas turbine operate in an aggressive environment where the temperature of service varies from ambient to near melting point of materials which introduce a variety of degradation on the components. Some components that lose their dimensional tolerance during use require repair and refurbishment when high cost replacement is avoidable. Erosion of fly ash and sand particles damages compressor blades which cause engine failure at an early stage. Dovetail roots of the compressor blades are subjected to fretting fatigue due to the oscillatory motion caused by vibration. Casing of the compressor comes in contact with rotating blades due to shaft misalignment, ovality of the casing and or inadequate clearance which cause blade and casing damage. Close clearance control that has bearing on the efficiency of the engine is therefore required in addition to preventing fire where titanium to titanium rubbing might occur. Wear out of the several contact surfaces which undergo rotating and reciprocating motion occur during the running of the engine need protection. Hot gases that are produced by burning the contaminated fuel in the combustion chamber will cause oxidation and corrosion on their passage. In the hot section rotating and stationary components need thermal insulation from higher operating temperature leading to enhanced thermodynamic efficiency of the engine. This wide range of functional requirements of the engine is met by applying an array of coatings that protect the components from failures. Current overview, while not aiming at deeper insight into the field of gas turbine coatings, brings out a summary of details of these coatings at one place, methods of application and characterization, degradation mechanisms and indicative future directions which are of use to a practicing industrial engineer. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Pustode M.D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Raja V.S.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Paulose N.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment
Corrosion Science | Year: 2014

The hot salt stress corrosion cracking (HSSCC) behaviour of a near α titanium alloy, IMI 834, was studied using slow strain rate test method in the temperature range 250-450. °C. The alloy was found to be susceptible to HSSCC at 300. °C and above; and the susceptibility increased with an increase in the test temperature. The secondary cracks grew exponentially with temperature. HSSC cracks initiated at α/β interfaces and grew across the primary α grain and along the α/β interfaces. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Kumar S.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment | Rao R.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment | Rajeevalochanam B.A.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment
Procedia Engineering | Year: 2013

Gas turbine engines are widely used in both Military and Civil Aircrafts. The power generated at the turbine is transmitted to compressor through Engine main shafts. These shafts are classified as Class-I critical components of the engine. During the flight operating conditions engine main shafts are subjected to complex loading conditions, such as Torsional, Centrifugal, Thermal, Gyroscopic etc⋯ The combination of these loads lead to multimode failure mechanisms, such as Low cycle Fatigue (LCF), High cycle Fatigue (HCF) and Ductile overload failures in shafts. Designing of shafts for structural integrity is very critical in single engine aircrafts, as the failure of any one shaft may result in the failure of engine, which in turn may lead to the catastrophic failure of the entire aircraft. The complex geometry of the shafts calls for combination of design tools for stress and life estimation of these parts (both analytical and finite element method (FEM)) backed up by extensive material and component test programs. In the present paper structural analysis and life estimation is carried out on Low Pressure Spool and Spline Coupling under various engine operating conditions. The design analysis cycle consists of several phases, such as Heat Transfer Analysis, Structural Analysis, Optimization and Fatigue Lifing. Detailed modeling and stress analysis carried out to evaluate the strength of the splines is also presented. This paper highlights the methodology of design subjected to clearance of stipulated MIL 5007 D/E specifications to ensure the structural integrity. Based on the stress analysis, a Stress Test Schedule is prepared to carry-out the testing at shaft fatigue rig facility. In the testing facility, mechanical testing of the shaft assembly is carried out to establish strength and fatigue life of the shafts. Brief results on the material tests carried out and fatigue life testing of full scale component are also presented. © 2013 The Authors.


Mahobia G.S.,Indian Institute of Technology BHU Varanasi | Paulose N.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment | Mannan S.L.,Gas Turbine Research Establishment | Sudhakar R.G.,Indian Institute of Technology BHU Varanasi | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Fatigue | Year: 2014

Low cycle fatigue behavior of the superalloy IN718 was studied with Type-A (Na2SO4 + NaCl) and Type-B (Na2SO4 + NaCl + V2O5) salt coatings, at 650 C in total strain controlled mode. Fatigue life of the salt coated specimens was found to be drastically reduced at all the total strain amplitudes. In general there was cyclic softening both in the bare as well as salt coated specimens. Variation of fatigue life with plastic strain amplitude followed Coffin-Manson relationship. Reduction in fatigue life from salt coating was found to be associated with early crack initiation from the roots of corrosion pits on the surface and faster crack propagation. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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