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Barcelona, Spain

Valdeolivas J.L.G.,Gas Natural | Mosquera J.C.,Technical University of Madrid
Journal of Pressure Vessel Technology, Transactions of the ASME | Year: 2015

The availability of tools for safety evaluation of a pressure liner is a relevant issue in both structural and hydraulic engineering. A suitable design of a steel liner may involve a significant reduction in the investment cost of a hydropower plant and may also ensure its future integrity, avoiding prolonged stoppages in the operation stage. First, a review of the design methods for steel pressure liners is outlined and certain key aspects for the critical buckling load assessment are pointed out. Second, a numerical modeling and analysis procedure of a steel pressure liner is presented. The methodology is based on 3D nonlinear finite element modeling procedures, involving both liner constraining and the effect of stiffeners. In addition, both large displacements and a surrounding elastic medium are assumed in the model. Besides, some types of geometric imperfections such as weld-induced ones, initial gap, ovality, and wall-thickness loss due to corrosion are taken into account in this work. Finally, some conclusions are drawn regarding the role of imperfections in the calculated critical pressure of a steel liner. Copyright © 2015 by ASME. Source


Valdeolivas J.L.G.,Gas Natural | Mosquera J.C.,Technical University of Madrid
Journal of Pipeline Systems Engineering and Practice | Year: 2016

The availability of tools for safety evaluation of a pressure liner is a relevant issue in both structural and hydraulic engineering. Parametric studies for assessing the stability of stiffened steel liners in hydroelectric pressure tunnels, as well as practical design guidelines, are presented in this paper. First, a review of the design methods for steel liners is outlined, with certain key aspects for the critical buckling load assessment of a steel pressure liner being considered. The methodology involves three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear finite element modeling procedures, in which liner constraining and the presence of stiffeners are taken into account. In addition, both large displacements and a surrounding elastic medium are assumed in the model. © 2015 American Society of Civil Engineers. Source


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: GC.SST.2012.2-3. | Award Amount: 14.34M | Year: 2013

LNG Blue Corridors unites/mobilizes the critical mass of experience (know-how, expertise, (industrial) parties and stakeholders) in LNG transport and infrastructure technology. It involves cooperation between heavy duty vehicle manufacturers, fuel suppliers, fuel distributors and fleet operators. The project includes a first definition of European LNG Blue Corridors, with strategic LNG refuelling points in order to guarantee LNG availability for road transport in a simple and cost effective way. The core of the project is the roll out and demonstration of the first stage of the roadmap of four LNG Blue Corridors involves the building of approx. 14 new LNG or L-CNG stations on critical points/locations in the Blue Corridors and the building up of a fleet of approx. 100 LNG Heavy Duty Vehicles and/or DF vehicles operating along the corridors. The project that is scheduled for 4 years has the ambition to connect over 12 Member States, to align to existing demonstrations running at national level, and to improve the knowledge and general awareness of LNG as alternative fuel for medium and long distance road transport.


News Article | November 9, 2015
Site: http://cleantechnica.com

Researchers have designed and patented a floating platform for offshore wind turbines that they believe can reduce costs up to 12 euro cents per kilowatt hour. A team of researchers from the the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) developed the new model of a floating structure for offshore wind turbines, called WindCrete, that is capable of being anchored at much greater sea depths. At the same time, this new prototype makes floating offshore wind competitive through cost savings in construction and maintenance. The prototype was designed through the framework of the European Alternative floating offshore substructure for offshore wind farms (AFOSP) project, which itself is carried out as part of the framework of KIC-InnoEnergy, in collaboration with Stuttgart Wind Energy at the University of Stuttgart and Gas Natural Fenosa. Researchers Climent Molins (shown right) and Alexis Campos, of the UPC’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, developed the new prototype, which uses concrete instead of the normally costly-steel, reducing construction costs by 60%. The cylindrical structure has a large float and a ballast base which allows it to be self-stabilizing — a vital component in any floating offshore platform, especially in the more dangerous and turbulent seas found in offshore wind hotspots like northern Europe. Interestingly, unlike many traditional offshore wind installations, the minimum depth is much deeper — the WindCrete requiring 90 meters to allow for its partially-submerged design. On the flip-side, WindCrete has no technical maximum depth — for example, there are oil platforms of similar design anchored in the Gulf of Mexico at depths of up to 2,300 meters. Floating wind turbines are likely to be a more and more common theme among new renewable energy technologies, given the amount of research and development currently being focused on the technology. Earlier this month Scotland approved construction of the world’s largest floating wind farm offshore from Peterhead in Aberdeenshire. The 30 MW project will be developed by Statoil, and is expected to be completed sometime late in 2017.    Get CleanTechnica’s 1st (completely free) electric car report → “Electric Cars: What Early Adopters & First Followers Want.”   Come attend CleanTechnica’s 1st “Cleantech Revolution Tour” event → in Berlin, Germany, April 9–10.   Keep up to date with all the hottest cleantech news by subscribing to our (free) cleantech newsletter, or keep an eye on sector-specific news by getting our (also free) solar energy newsletter, electric vehicle newsletter, or wind energy newsletter.  


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.6.2 | Award Amount: 4.89M | Year: 2013

Data centres are involved play two different and complementary roles in Smart Cities energy policies with two roles: as ICT infrastructures supporting Smart City resource optimization systems - and more in general, delivering for ICT services to the citizens - and as large energy consumers. Therefore there are huge expectations on data centres being able to run at the highest levels of renewable energy sources: this is the great challenge of DC4Cities project.\nDC4Cities addresses these requirements optimizing data centre operations as well as software running in the data centre for minimal energy consumption and adaptivity to external energy constrains, targeting the 80% usage of renewable energy sources.\nThe goal of DC4Cities is to let make existing and new data centres become energy adaptive, without requiring any logistics modification to the logistics, and without impacting the quality of the services provided to their users. Finally new energy metrics, benchmarks, and measurement processes will be developed and proposed for the definition of new related standards.\nDC4Cities will promote the data centres role as an eco-friendly key player in the Smart Cities energy policies, and will foster the integration of a network of local renewable energy providers (also interconnected with local Smart Grids and microgrids) to support the pursued increase of renewable energy share.

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