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Cook V.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group
Teaching Geography | Year: 2012

Victoria Cook provides a brief introduction to the literature on risk, highlighting some of the uncertainties surrounding its conceptualization. She argues that education professionals and students should both be involved in discussions about risk. The literature on risk is diverse, spanning disciplines including sociology, economics and psychology. Socioeconomic issues such as poverty and vulnerability, or political issues, including the decision to build on floodplains, may all affect people's exposure to, and perceptions of, risk. Viewing risk as a social construction also affects how students learn geography. The three schools in my research demonstrated markedly different understandings of fieldwork risk. At Hepleton School, concerns that poor student behavior might result in accidents and a risk of litigation meant that only the better behaved students were taken into the field. Given the lack of consensus surrounding the conceptualization of risk, it is important that one engages with the perspectives of students themselves in discussions about risk. Source


House D.,Leonard Wills Field Center | Lapthorn N.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group | Moncrieff D.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group | Owen-Jones G.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group | Turney A.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group
Teaching Geography | Year: 2012

Fieldwork is an opportunity for students to expand their geographical horizons. The concepts and issues studied in the classroom and reinforced through course texts are brought to life through experiencing and witnessing them in the real world. Traditional fieldwork is often slotted in between classroom sessions. There is usually a 'setting up' investigation session first, with students generating hypotheses and deciding what methods to use to collect data. Students should be encouraged to achieve higher order thinking out in the field. Students should be engaged in the outdoor classroom learning process, rather than passive recipients of knowledge. Ensure students are aware of what they are trying to learn and how they can improve their understanding. At A level, the way one approaches fieldwork has other implications. The modular assessment mark is a valuable component of the final grade, so it is tempting to stick to tried and tested types of fieldwork. Source


Charlton M.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group | Lapthorn N.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group | Moncrieff D.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group | Turney A.,GAs Fieldwork and Outdoor Learning Special Interest Group
Teaching Geography | Year: 2012

The coastal zone is a stimulating and dynamic environment that offers enormous scope for students of all ages to engage with fieldwork and geography from a wide variety of perspectives. The coast is typically a meeting place of terrestrial and coastal processes and also the zone of interaction between physical processes and human activity. More able students can simply read the map, reach the point and follow up with a statement, question, opinion or query. With less able students, use photographs on the map sheet and question cues. Fieldwork offers many opportunities for activities which help students create 'physical' links with the environment. These activities can often be used to support other outdoor learning activities such as a beach-profiling investigation. There is often a tension between using the best sites to engage students in effective learning and minimizing their environmental impact: from widening footpaths and damaging fragile foreshores right through to disposing of their lunch wrappings and the intrusive impact of fieldwork on local communities. Source

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