Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow

Glasgow, United Kingdom

Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow

Glasgow, United Kingdom
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Mansell J.,New Victoria Hospital Glasgow | Weiler-Mithoff E.,Royal Infirmary | Stallard S.,Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow | Doughty J.C.,Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow | And 3 more authors.
Breast | Year: 2017

Background Support for the oncological safety of oncoplastic breast conservation surgery (OBCS) is mostly based on evidence comparing recurrence rates after OBCS to wide local excision (WLE). However, OBCS is often indicated for larger cancers and oncological results should also be compared to patients treated with mastectomy. In this study we compared recurrence and survival following OBCS, mastectomy and WLE. Methods Patients treated with OBCS between 2009 and 2012 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. For comparison, consecutive patients treated with WLE or mastectomy with or without immediate reconstruction (Ms ± IR) over the same time period were identified. Histological variables of patients were compared using Fisher Exact or Chi squared tests, and recurrence and survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression survival analysis. Results 980 patients' data were analysed (OBCS: n = 104; WLE: n = 558; Ms ± IR: n = 318). Tumour size, grade, nodal status, ER, and PR expression of patients treated with OBCS were all significantly more adverse compared with patients treated with WLE (p < 0.001). These histological variables were similar in patients treated with Ms ± IR and OBCS. 5-year local recurrence rates were similar in all three groups (WLE: 3.4 per cent, OBCS: 2 per cent, Ms ± IR: 2.6 per cent; log rank = 0.973), while distant recurrence rates were higher after Ms ± IR and OBCS (Ms ± IR:13.1 per cent, OBCS:7.5 per cent, WLE:3.3 per cent; log rank: p < 0.001). Conclusion OBCS is oncologically safe in patients even when histological results are similar to patients treated with Ms ± IR. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Ockrim Z.,Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow | Weir C.R.,Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow | Yim J.L.,Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow | Cleary M.,Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow
Strabismus | Year: 2013

Purpose: To investigate how frequently botulinum toxin, when used as a postoperative diplopia test, reduces the angle of deviation prior to subsequent strabismus surgery. Methods: A retrospective study of 39 adult patients with constant concomitant horizontal strabismus who had undergone botulinum toxin injections to assess the risk of postoperative diplopia and then subsequently underwent strabismus surgery. Results: Fourteen out of 39 patients (36%) sustained a reduction of 15 prism diopters or more for near and/or distance when comparing the pre-injection angle of deviation with the preoperative angle of deviation. Conclusion: Approximately one-third of patients receiving botulinum toxin as a postoperative diplopia test maintained a significant reduction in the angle of their deviation prior to undergoing surgery. © 2013 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.


PubMed | Gartnavel General Hospital Glasgow
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Strabismus | Year: 2013

To investigate how frequently botulinum toxin, when used as a postoperative diplopia test, reduces the angle of deviation prior to subsequent strabismus surgery.A retrospective study of 39 adult patients with constant concomitant horizontal strabismus who had undergone botulinum toxin injections to assess the risk of postoperative diplopia and then subsequently underwent strabismus surgery.Fourteen out of 39 patients (36%) sustained a reduction of 15 prism diopters or more for near and/or distance when comparing the pre-injection angle of deviation with the preoperative angle of deviation.Approximately one-third of patients receiving botulinum toxin as a postoperative diplopia test maintained a significant reduction in the angle of their deviation prior to undergoing surgery.

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