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Coskun Y.,Harran University | Coskun A.,GAP Soil Water Resources and Agricultural Research Institute | Demirel U.,Harran University | Ozden M.,Harran University
Australian Journal of Crop Science | Year: 2011

This study was conducted to investigate physiological response of maize to high temperature stress. Field trial was carried out in a randomized block design with three replications during the second crop season of the year 2008 in Sanliurfa, Turkey. RI, chlorophyll content, and Chla/b were measured in laboratory. LT, DF, and GY were measured in field trial. The relations among the investigated characteristics were evaluated by correlation analysis. We found that early mature varieties had higher values with regard to chlorophyll content and GY compared to late mature varieties. However, early mature varieties had lower values with regard to RI, LT, and DF than late mature varieties. Correlation analysis revealed significant relations among the characteristics measured. It was concluded that early mature varieties having lower LT and RI levels compared to late mature varieties might be recommended as second crop for the region with extremely high temperatures during the second crop season.


Sakin E.,Harran University | Deliboran A.,GAP Soil Water Resources and Agricultural Research Institute | Sakin E.D.,Harran University | Aslan H.,GAP Soil Water Resources and Agricultural Research Institute
Romanian Agricultural Research | Year: 2011

Previous studies have focused on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks of soils because of increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) and terrestrial ecosystems with wide N storages. The goal of this study was to determine C amounts and stocks that are important for global warming, N amounts and stocks and C:N ratios. To this end, 16 series were opened on the Harran Plain and soil samples were taken from 100 cm depth and each horizon. The results showed that total carbon amounts varied between 0.80 and 1.85 kg C m -2. N amounts were between 0.16 and 0.34 kg N m -2, C:N ratios were between 4.32:1 and 6.04:1 and bulk density (BD) was 1.23-1.34 Mg m -3. Carbon and N stocks were determined as 10.53 Tg C and 1.96 Tg N, respectively.


Erden K.,Harran University | Ozel A.,Harran University | Demirel U.,Harran University | Kosar I.,GAP Soil Water Resources and Agricultural Research Institute
Bulgarian Journal of Agricultural Science | Year: 2013

A field study was conducted to evaluate the agronomic response of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) on the Harran Plain (Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey) to four seed rate (5, 10, 15, 20 kg ha-1) and two row spacing (15 cm and 30 cm), in the years of 2000-2003. The experiment was set up according to randomized complete block design with split plot. Seed yield, essential oil yield, essential oil ratio, 1000-seed weight, number of seed per umbel, number of branch per plant, number of umbel per plant and essential oil components ratio were significantly affected seed amount and inter row spacing. The treatment of 15 cm × 10 kg ha-1 in which the highest seed yield and essential oil yield were obtained, was found to be the most appropriate. Cuminaldehyde was determined the main component under all treatments and it was determined the highest values from the 15 cm row spacing and 10-15 kg ha-1 seed amounts.


Copur O.,Harran University | Demirel U.,Harran University | Karakus M.,GAP Soil Water Resources and Agricultural Research Institute
Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca | Year: 2010

Plant growth regulators (PGR) are used in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production to balance vegetative and reproductive growth, as well as to increase seed cotton yield and lint quality. Field experiments were conducted with some PGRs to determine their effects on yield and yield components of cotton using cv. 'Stoneville 453'. The study was conducted at Harran University Agricultural Research and Application Center located in Şanli{dotless}urfa, Turkey in 2004 and 2005. Seven commercial PGRs (Pix, Bigtonik, Biozyme® TF, K-Humate, Maxicrop and Biogibb) were sprayed at recommended doses and application time during the study. Experiments were arranged as randomized complete plot design with three replications. Experimental plots consisted of 12 meter long with six rows, 0.70 m row spacing and 0.20 m plant-spacing on row. The results showed that the applied PGRs (except pix) had significant positive effects on the seed cotton yield, plant height, average number of open bolls, number of sympodia, boll weight, lint percentage and seed index and decreased the earliness index. However, fiber length, fiber fineness, fiber strength and fiber uniformity were not affected by the treatments. Higher yields were obtained in Maxicrop, Biozyme® TF and Biogibb treated plots. Therefore, PGRs might be considered a component of cotton growth management to provide higher seed cotton yields.


Ozel A.,Harran University | Demirel U.,Harran University | Erden K.,Harran University | Kosar I.,GAP Soil Water Resources and Agricultural Research Institute
Research Journal of Pharmaceutical, Biological and Chemical Sciences | Year: 2016

A field study was conducted to evaluate the agronomic response of coriander (Corriandrum sativum L.) on the Harran Plain (Southeastern Anatolia, Turkey) to four seed rate (10, 20, 30 and 40 kg ha-1) and two row spacing (15 cm and 30 cm), in two growing seasons. The experiment was set up according to randomized complete block design with split plot. Seed yield, essential oil yield, essential oil ratio, 1000-seed weight, number of seed per umbel, number of branch per plant, number of umbel per plant and Linalool ratio were significantly affected seed amount and row spacing. The treatment of 15 cm x 20 kg ha-1 in which the highest seed yield and essential oil yield were obtained, was found to be the most appropriate. The Linalool was determined the main component (61.59-70.14 %) under all treatments and it was determined the highest values from the 15 cm row spacing and 20 kg ha-1 seed amounts.

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