Gantz Family Collections Center

Chicago, IL, United States

Gantz Family Collections Center

Chicago, IL, United States
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Campbell D.C.,Gardner - Webb University | Clark S.A.,Invertebrate Identification | Clark S.A.,Gantz Family Collections Center | Lydeard C.,Morehead State University
ZooKeys | Year: 2017

We examined the patelliform snails of the subfamily Lancinae, endemic to northwestern North America, to test whether morphological variation correlated with genetic and anatomical differences. Molecular analyses using cox1, 16S, calmodulin intron, and 28S rDNA partial sequences and anatomical data supported recognition of four species in three genera. The relationships of lancines within Lymnaeidae are not yet well-resolved. The federally endangered Banbury Springs lanx is described as a new genus and species, Idaholanx fresti, confirming its distinctiveness and narrow endemicity. © David C. Campbell et al.


Flores J.R.,CONICET | Flores J.R.,National University of Tucuman | Von Konrat M.,Gantz Family Collections Center | Larrain J.,Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaíso | And 2 more authors.
Cryptogamie, Bryologie | Year: 2017

Cephaloziella hampeana (Nees) Schiffn. ex Loeske is recorded for the first time in South America. This record considerably extends the distributional range of C. hampeana and raises the question on the role that high mountain environments play in dispersing species along the continent. The morphological differences of C. hampeana with its purportedly allied species are discussed. Additionally, its disjunct distributional pattern is briefly compared with those of other liverworts. Photomicrographs and a distributional map are provided. © 2017 Adac.


Heinrichs J.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Feldberg K.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Muller P.,University of Hamburg | Schafer-Verwimp A.,Mittlere Letten 11 | And 4 more authors.
Cretaceous Research | Year: 2017

An inclusion in Cretaceous amber from Myanmar is described as a new fossil species in the extant liverwort genus Frullania. The name Frullania pinnata is proposed for the taxon that is characterized by entire underleaves paired with a conspicuous pinnate branching pattern, two distinctive and stable morphological features. Entire underleaves are known in several extant Frullania species but had not previously been documented in Frullania in amber. The combination of morphological characters in this new fossil species is unknown in any crown group lineage of Frullania, and may very well represent a stem lineage element of the genus. This discovery is important because it expands our understanding of the diversity of Frullaniaceae in the Burmese amber forest as well as important ramifications for the phylogenetic reconstruction of extant Frullania lineages. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd


Sulzbacher M.A.,Federal University of Pernambuco | Wartchow F.,Federal University of Paraiba | Ovrebo C.L.,University of Central Oklahoma | Sousa J.O.,Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte | And 3 more authors.
Lichenologist | Year: 2016

Sulzbacheromyces is a recently erected genus in Lepidostromatales, differing from Lepidostroma in the crustose thallus. After the initial discovery of S. caatingae, the only species to be found in Brazil so far, a large quantity of additional data and ITS barcoding sequences for this taxon from a much broader geographical range and different habitats was collected. Phylogenetic analysis under a maximum likelihood framework demonstrated that all specimens are genetically uniform, showing no variation in their ITS, suggesting that S. caatingae has a wide ecological amplitude beyond the Brazilian Caatinga and Atlantic Forest biomes. Detailed descriptions and illustrations of the species are presented, including a map showing the distribution of S. caatingae in the Brazilian semi-arid region and the north-eastern Atlantic rainforest. © 2016 British Lichen Society.


Khan N.F.,Roosevelt University | Murdoch K.C.,Integrative Research Center | Murdoch K.C.,Gantz Family Collections Center | Feldheim K.A.,Integrative Research Center | And 3 more authors.
BMC Research Notes | Year: 2015

Background: The Buff-spotted Woodpecker (Campethera nivosa) is a resident bird species that is distributed in lowland rainforest habitats from western to eastern Africa. We developed species-specific microsatellite markers to examine the population genetics of this species. Findings: Twenty-one microsatellite loci were isolated from C. nivosa. Of these, 15 were found to amplify consistently. These loci were then tested for variability in 15 individuals from different lowland forest localities. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 13 per locus, with observed and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.100 to 0.917 and 0.485 to 0.901, respectively. Four loci exhibited significant heterozygote deficiency while one had an excess of heterozygotes. None of the loci exhibited linkage disequilibrium. Conclusion: These polymorphic microsatellite markers will be used to study genetic variability in populations of C. nivosa across either sides of the Congo River to evaluate the effect of the river as a barrier to gene flow. © 2015 Khan et al.


PubMed | Integrative Research Center, Roosevelt University and Gantz Family Collections Center
Type: | Journal: BMC research notes | Year: 2015

The Buff-spotted Woodpecker (Campethera nivosa) is a resident bird species that is distributed in lowland rainforest habitats from western to eastern Africa. We developed species-specific microsatellite markers to examine the population genetics of this species.Twenty-one microsatellite loci were isolated from C. nivosa. Of these, 15 were found to amplify consistently. These loci were then tested for variability in 15 individuals from different lowland forest localities. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 13 per locus, with observed and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.100 to 0.917 and 0.485 to 0.901, respectively. Four loci exhibited significant heterozygote deficiency while one had an excess of heterozygotes. None of the loci exhibited linkage disequilibrium.These polymorphic microsatellite markers will be used to study genetic variability in populations of C. nivosa across either sides of the Congo River to evaluate the effect of the river as a barrier to gene flow.


Hentschel J.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena | von Konrat M.,Gantz Family Collections Center | Soderstrom L.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Hagborg A.,Gantz Family Collections Center | And 4 more authors.
Phytotaxa | Year: 2015

The liverwort family Frullaniaceae is circumscribed to include the single genus, Frullania, and has a complex and confusing taxonomical history. An overview is provided for the infrageneric classification adopted for the forthcoming worldwide checklist based on recent morphological and molecular studies. The genus is preliminarily subdivided into eleven subgenera, F. subg. Chonanthelia, F. subg. Diastaloba, F. subg. Diversitextae, F. subg. Frullania, F. subg. Homotropantha, F. subg. Mammillosae, F. subg. Meteoriopsis, F. subg. Microfrullania, F. subg. Saccophora, F. subg. Steerea, and F. subg. Thyopsiella, as well as several sections. However, some of the subgeneric divisions are only doubtfully recognized because there is still insufficient knowledge to arrive at a decision regarding their systematic status and placement. The taxa may be either originally not well described, not restudied recently or molecular analyses point to a more complex internal structure of the respective group. Fourteen new synonyms, eight new combinations, five new names, eight lectotypifications, and one new variety are provided. © 2015 Magnolia Press.


Leacock P.R.,Gantz Family Collections Center | Riddell J.,School of the Art Institute of Chicago | Wilson A.W.,Plant Conservation Science | Zhang R.,Northwestern University | And 2 more authors.
Mycologia | Year: 2016

Recent molecular systematic studies of Cantharellus cibarius sensu lato have revealed previously unknown species in different regions of North America. This study investigates yellow chanterelles in the Midwest using phylogenetic analysis of three DNA regions: nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and 28S sequences and translation elongation factor 1α gene (EF1α). This analysis reveals a locally common taxon Cantharellus chicagoensis sp. nov. as distinct from sympatric species present in northeastern Illinois, northwestern Indiana and Wisconsin. This chanterelle features a pileus that often has a greenish yellow margin when immature, a squamulose disk when mature, a yellow spore print and the absence of a fragrant odor. Multiple Cantharellus specimens group with C. flavus and C. phasmatis, expanding their known range, and others with C. roseocanus. Our observations highlight the diversity of Cantharellus in midwestern USA and further document the need for additional systematic focus on the region's fungi. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.


Soderstrom L.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Hagborg A.,Gantz Family Collections Center | Von Konrat M.,Gantz Family Collections Center
Phytotaxa | Year: 2016

A widely accessible list of known plant species is a fundamental requirement for plant conservation and has vast applications. An index of published names of liverworts and hornworts between 2013 and 2014 is provided as part of a continued effort in working toward producing a world checklist of this group. The list includes 50 higher taxa, 361 species, 82 infraspecific taxa, and 50 infraspecific autonyms for 2013 and 2014. Three of them are fossils. Five older names not included in the earlier indices are included. Three illegitimate and 13 invalid names are also included. New to science are 105 species and 22 infraspecific taxa. © 2016 Magnolia Press.


Ciampor F.,Slovak Academy of Sciences | Lassova K.,A. Gwerkovej 4 | Maier C.A.,University of Kansas | Maier C.A.,Gantz Family Collections Center | And 2 more authors.
Zootaxa | Year: 2016

The monotypic genus Phanoceroides was initially classified within the subfamily Elminae, based solely on the distribution and type of pubescence on the body surface. Although a close relationship with Larainae was suggested (Hinton 1939, Maier 2013), its taxonomic position and phylogeny remained unresolved. Based on newly collected material, we describe here P. fernandesi sp. n. and document morphological characters and differences of adults and larvae of P. aquaticus Hinton, 1939 and P. fernandesi sp. n. To clarify the taxonomic position of Phanoceroides within Elmidae, we used molecular data (cox1 and mtDNA). The results support position of the genus within the subfamily Larainae with Hypsilara Maier & Spangler, 2011 as a close relative. Copyright © 2016 Magnolia Press.

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