Ganko Food Service Co.

Ōsaka, Japan

Ganko Food Service Co.

Ōsaka, Japan
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Aoki K.,Yokohama National University | Akai K.,University of Tokyo | Ujiie K.,University of Tsukuba | Shinmura T.,Ganko Food Service Co. | Nishino N.,University of Tokyo
International Journal of Automation Technology | Year: 2014

This study investigates the effects of eco-information on the environmental consciousness and attitudes of consumers towards agricultural products. We focus on Japanese rice to provide recommendations to protect the Ibis, an endangered bird in Japan, and evaluate how Ecologically Conscious Consumer Behavior (ECCB) affect consumers’ Willingness To Pay (WTP) via the choice experiment method. Participants are provided with the necessary eco-information pertaining to rice production, and are required to taste and purchase the rice. The results indicate that consumers with high ECCB display higher WTP after they are provided with the necessary eco-information pertaining to rice production. © 2009 Fuji Technology Press Co,. Ltd. All Rights Reserved.


Shimamura T.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Shimamura T.,Ganko Food Service Co. | Takenaka T.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Ohura S.,Ganko Food Service Co.
IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology | Year: 2013

This study examined improvement of labor productivity and elasticity of labor hour on sales of a multiproduct Japanese cuisine restaurant. Conventionally, multiproduct restaurant operations include a line production system in the kitchen. Japanese chefs are assumed to be low-skilled workers with staff members supported by someone. A cell production system is introduced into a Japanese Cuisine restaurant to improve it. Results show that the cell production system improves both labor productivity and elasticity of labor hours because the system reduces fixed labor hours during less-busy times in the kitchen. To introduce the system, it is important to educate and train kitchen staff members because the system requires preparation of other staff members’ food orders during idle time. © IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2013.


Shimmura T.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Shimmura T.,Ganko Food Service Co. | Akamatsu M.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Takenaka T.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Oura S.,Ganko Food Service Co.
Journal of Japan Industrial Management Association | Year: 2011

This paper proposes a method to improve the cooking processes and distribution of workload for employees in a restaurant specializing in dinner in order to meet the varying demands of customers' orders. In a restaurant, the total number of dishes differs each day. However, the method of changing the workload distribution among cooking staff according to the total number of dishes to improve cooking speed is not usually used. In this paper, first, we develop a system to compute cooking time through analyzing the behavior of the kitchen staff. The system is incorporated with a recipe system that includes the necessary ingredients and cooking processes, enabling calculation of cooking time without behavior measurement. Second, we analyze the relationship between customers' orders and the workload of each cooking staff using POS data, the recipe system and an attendance planning system. The results suggest that 1) although the recipe system can calculate theoretical cooking time, the correction index is required to calculate actual cooking time because additional operations are required when kitchen staff change the dish prepared, and 2) the restaurant manager can detect operational problems and improve operations by comparing customer orders and kitchen staff workloads.


Nonaka T.,Aoyama Gakuin University | Fujii N.,Kobe University | Shimmura T.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Shimmura T.,Ganko Food Service Co. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Japan Industrial Management Association | Year: 2016

The importance of employee satisfaction concerning supply of good service has been widely recognized. To enhance both employee satisfaction and service quality, investigation of employee satisfaction and clarification of its structure are required. This paper analyzes employee satisfaction in restaurant services; a Japanese cuisine restaurant chain located in Japan is selected as the analytical target. In the restaurants, there are various types of employees and each employee is also required to have specific skills and techniques in each contact point according to his/her working position. Furthermore, service production in the restaurant is done in a labor-intensive manner; staff who work on the service floor provide their service face-to-face with customers. In the kitchen, service operations still include many hand-made processes that create value. Hence, the working conditions of the staff may possibly influence their provision of service. This study conducts a questionnaire for restaurant staff. An employee satisfaction model is proposed considering customer-oriented motivations and contact points in their service provision processes. Difference of satisfaction structures are discussed using correlation analysis and covariance structure analysis among kitchen staff, floor staff, and washing and pantry staff based on the results of the questionnaire.


Shimmura T.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Shimmura T.,Ganko Food Service Co. | Akamatsu M.,Japan National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology | Matsunami H.,Osaka Gas Co. | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Japan Industrial Management Association | Year: 2013

In this research, cooking behaviors in the kitchen are measured using behavior observation methods to achieve improvements in both quality and work efficiency. In the first study, the cooking behaviors of proficient kitchen staff and normal kitchen staff are observed. Corrective strategies are then discussed through analyzing the relationship with quality and work efficiency. In the second study, the cooking operations, such as roles and methods, are rearranged in order to examine the effectiveness. Three findings are obtained. 1) cooking behaviors can be divided into two tasks: those that require skills, and those that don't, 2) cooking roles should be determined not by the physical arrangement in the kitchen but by cooking skills to improve both the work efficiency and the quality of dish, and 3) demand fluctuation should be considered to implement corrective strategies for cooking operations. Copyright © 2013 National Institute of Informatics.


Nonaka T.,Aoyama Gakuin University | Shimmura T.,Ganko Food Service Co. | Fujii N.,Kobe University | Mizuyama H.,Aoyama Gakuin University
IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology | Year: 2015

This paper examines features of energy consumption in the food service industry considering the possible effects caused by properties of service such as intangibility, heterogeneity, perishability, and simultaneity. This study examines four food service businesses: restaurant services with a cook-chill system, restaurant services with a cook-serve system, delivery of prepared food services, and home-meal replacements. The service provision process is analysed along with the energy input for each process. Subsequently, a conceptual model of energy demand management considering the simultaneity of service is proposed as a first step goal to enhance energy demand management. © IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2015.

Loading Ganko Food Service Co. collaborators
Loading Ganko Food Service Co. collaborators