Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals

Bhopal, India

Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals

Bhopal, India

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PubMed | Ln Medical College And Research Center And Jk Hospital, Peoples University and Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of maxillofacial and oral surgery | Year: 2015

It remains vital for the trauma management team including the anaesthetist and the operating surgeon to assess and evaluate the anticipated difficulty in intubation to secure airway and for administration of anaesthesia. This study assesses the difficulty in intubating patients with vertically unstable mandibular parasymphysis fracture with attached genial tubercles and associated musculature to the fractured segment.Randomized sampling was done from the cases with maxillofacial trauma planned for a surgical procedure under general anaesthesia. The inclusion criteria was to prospectively identify ten patients each of unilateral unfavourable mandibular parasymphysis fracture with genial tubercle attached to the displaced segment, with bilateral unfavourable mandibular parasymphysis fracture with genial tubercle attached to the displaced segment and with unilateral favourable mandibular parasymphysis fracture with genial tubercle attached to the un-displaced segment. All the patients were intubated by a single anaesthetist, who documented the difficulty in nasoendotracheal intubation using Intubation Difficulty Scale.Nasoendotracheal intubation was found relatively easy in the study group with unilateral favourable mandibular parasymphysis fracture with genial tubercle attached to the un-displaced segment. Clinical difficulty in intubating the patients was maximum in the study group with bilateral unfavourable mandibular parasymphysis fracture with genial tubercle attached to the displaced segment.Displacement of fractured mandible and resultant displacement of the genial musculature should be considered as a vital parameter for assessing difficulty during intubation.


Jain S.K.,Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals | Songra M.,Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals | Malhotra A.,Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals | Kapoor N.,Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals | And 2 more authors.
Indian Journal of Surgery | Year: 2011

Haemangiomas account for approximately 1% of all bone tumours and commonly involve the skull and the vertebrae Dorfman et al. (Human Pathol 2:349-376, 1971). Rare costal originated haemangiomas have been reported as a case report in literature Clements et al. (Am Surgeon 64:1027-1029, 1998), Filosso et al. (J Cardiovasc Surg 36:97-98, 1995). We report a case of 26 years old female presenting with haemangioma of the eighth rib (right). And conclude that haemangiomas should be included in the differential diagnoses of an osteolytic and expansile lesion of the ribs on radiology, especially in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients. © 2011 Association of Surgeons of India.


Shad R.,Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals | Agarwal A.,Gandhi Medical College and Associated Hospitals
Indian Journal of Anaesthesia | Year: 2012

Safety pins are not commonly aspirated objects in infants and form only a small fraction of all the metallic foreign body (FB) which accounts for 4.4% of all foreign bodies found in tracheobronchial tree. Bronchoscopy procedure has various complications, in addition to failure to remove FB due to its impaction, especially with metallic pointed objects ending up in open surgical removal. Infant with inhaled foreign body are always a challenge to anaesthetist. We had one such case of broken safety pin impacted in the wall of right bronchus of an infant with failure to remove on repeated attempts at rigid bronchoscopy.


Tandon R.,Gandhi Medical College and associated Hospitals | Agarwal A.,Gandhi Medical College and associated Hospitals | Mehrotra S.,Gandhi Medical College and associated Hospitals
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2016

This is a report of a two cases of difficult intubation experienced in paediatric surgical cases. Both the infants, aged one and three-month-old respectively, had very large cystic hygroma of the neck area. Prior hematological and radiological investigations (USG and CT scan of the swelling) and preanaesthesia check up was done and cases were posted for surgical excision. Case I had difficult airway due to pressure of the tumour/cystic hygroma over the airway and posed difficulty for intubation, but was managed well. Case II had respiratory distress during preoperative period. She had been postponed for surgical excision of the cystic hygroma of neck twice due to the difficulties experienced during intubation. Needle aspiration of hygroma fluid helped to reduce the respiratory distress, and the size of the tumour as well, which further helped in the smooth intubation after a week. The postoperative period was uneventful in both the infants. © 2016, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.

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