Cincinnati, OH, United States
Cincinnati, OH, United States
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Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 449.57K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II program will develop electrofluidic smart window modules with unique capabilities for managing infrared as well as visible light. As a result, these windows will better manage solar heat gain by switching between infrared transmittance and reflectivity. The ultimate objective is to develop skylights, windows, and roofs that adapt to seasonal, regional, and diurnal changes in solar flux and heating and cooling requirements. These window modules change the optical properties of surfaces by moving pigment from a small area reservoir to full surface coverage in a similar manner to the way squids change their skin color. The Phase I program developed pigmented fluids with engineering infrared responses, and demonstrated proof-of-concept functioning devices operating with these fluids. The Phase II project will develop the designs, processing strategies, and materials for full smart windows modules. Windows modules will then be built, measured, and directly compared with status quo windows. The innovation in this work is the development and realization of entirely new materials and devices for managing near-infrared light over a large surface area. The broader impact/commercial potential of this smart window technology is empowering buildings to actively manage solar heat gain to improve energy efficiency, which is a truly green solution. U.S. building energy consumption (40% of total U.S. Energy Consumption) can be reduced significantly with smart windows and smart skylights that maximize sunlight for lighting, while effectively managing solar heat gain, including near-infrared energy. Current passive technologies for windows do not readily adapt to seasonal, regional, and diurnal changes in solar flux and heating and cooling requirements. By empowering buildings to adapt solar heat gain to daily local needs, U.S. energy consumption could be reduced by as much as one quadrillion BTU per year, while adding minimal cost to building infrastructure. The commercialization path for this technology is through the Advanced Flat Glass segment of the Flat Glass market. In addition, this program will enhance scientific innovation at the Ohio Center for Microfluidic Innovation, a cluster for commercializing micro/electrofluidic technology.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 615.04K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will create electronic paper displays from a new e-paper technology that promises substantially improved black and white contrast, bright color images, multimedia/internet update speeds, and zero power image hold. The technology, an electrofluidic pixel that uses voltage to move a colored pigment in a fluid, is capable of achieving twice the reflectivity of existing e-paper solutions. This improvement in reflectivity enables the color saturation found in printed media. The multi-stable pixel designs demonstrated in the Phase I program make possible zero power images with grayscales. The Phase II research project will develop the technology for complete electronic paper displays incorporating this new pixel technology that are robust and manufacturable, and that achieve record reflectance (~ 70%). The first prototypes to be designed and created will be simple information content displays with simple electrical drive, such as electronic shelf labels. The later stage prototypes will be e-Reader displays with active matrix backplanes.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the widespread replacement of paper-media with electronic paper, providing superior low power products to the current burgeoning market. In particular, the improvements demonstrated in this project enable saturated colors and multimedia video rates with a zero-power image hold, thereby overcoming performance barriers that have blocked low power color electronic books from entering the market. For example, this technology could replace a stack of textbooks with a single lightweight color multimedia tablet. The market opportunity is easily in excess of $10B, and will support numerous new U.S. jobs under a business model providing a sustainable economic benefit to the U.S.A. Multi-stable electrofluidic technology is also well suited for both small and large electronic signage applications.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 459.57K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II program will develop electrofluidic smart window modules with unique capabilities for managing infrared as well as visible light. As a result, these windows will better manage solar heat gain by switching between infrared transmittance and reflectivity. The ultimate objective is to develop skylights, windows, and roofs that adapt to seasonal, regional, and diurnal changes in solar flux and heating and cooling requirements. These window modules change the optical properties of surfaces by moving pigment from a small area reservoir to full surface coverage in a similar manner to the way squids change their skin color. The Phase I program developed pigmented fluids with engineering infrared responses, and demonstrated proof-of-concept functioning devices operating with these fluids. The Phase II project will develop the designs, processing strategies, and materials for full smart windows modules. Windows modules will then be built, measured, and directly compared with status quo windows. The innovation in this work is the development and realization of entirely new materials and devices for managing near-infrared light over a large surface area.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this smart window technology is empowering buildings to actively manage solar heat gain to improve energy efficiency, which is a truly green solution. U.S. building energy consumption (40% of total U.S. Energy Consumption) can be reduced significantly with smart windows and smart skylights that maximize sunlight for lighting, while effectively managing solar heat gain, including near-infrared energy. Current passive technologies for windows do not readily adapt to seasonal, regional, and diurnal changes in solar flux and heating and cooling requirements. By empowering buildings to adapt solar heat gain to daily local needs, U.S. energy consumption could be reduced by as much as one quadrillion BTU per year, while adding minimal cost to building infrastructure. The commercialization path for this technology is through the Advanced Flat Glass segment of the Flat Glass market. In addition, this program will enhance scientific innovation at the Ohio Center for Microfluidic Innovation, a cluster for commercializing micro/electrofluidic technology.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.87K | Year: 2010

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will demonstrate feasibility of creating surfaces that actively manage solar heat gain by switching between infrared transmittance and reflectivity. The ultimate objective is to develop skylights, windows, and roofs that adapt to seasonal, regional, and diurnal changes in solar flux and heating and cooling requirements. The Phase I objective is to develop electrofluidic pigment materials systems incorporating infrared-reflecting particles and other infrared strategies. The infrared modulation performance of these new materials systems will then be demonstrated in low cost electrofluidic modules. These modules change the optical properties of surfaces by moving pigment from a small area reservoir to full surface coverage in a similar manner to the way squids change their skin color. The innovation in this work is the development an entirely new materials system and method for managing near-infrared light over a large surface area. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to improve the energy efficiency of buildings. U.S. building energy consumption (40% of total U.S. Energy Consumption) can be reduced significantly by maximizing sunlight for lighting, while effectively managing solar heat gain. Current passive technologies (windows, insulation, paint, etc.) do not readily adapt to seasonal, regional, and diurnal changes in solar flux and heating and cooling requirements. By empowering buildings to actively manage solar heat gain, U.S. energy consumption can be reduced by more than 1 quadrillion BTU per year, while adding minimal cost to building infrastructure. There is also a large commercialization opportunity in selling active skylights, windows, roof tiles, etc. through partnerships with existing manufacturers.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 500.00K | Year: 2011

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II project will create electronic paper displays from a new e-paper technology that promises substantially improved black and white contrast, bright color images, multimedia/internet update speeds, and zero power image hold. The technology, an electrofluidic pixel that uses voltage to move a colored pigment in a fluid, is capable of achieving twice the reflectivity of existing e-paper solutions. This improvement in reflectivity enables the color saturation found in printed media. The multi-stable pixel designs demonstrated in the Phase I program make possible zero power images with grayscales. The Phase II research project will develop the technology for complete electronic paper displays incorporating this new pixel technology that are robust and manufacturable, and that achieve record reflectance (~ 70%). The first prototypes to be designed and created will be simple information content displays with simple electrical drive, such as electronic shelf labels. The later stage prototypes will be e-Reader displays with active matrix backplanes. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is the widespread replacement of paper-media with electronic paper, providing superior low power products to the current burgeoning market. In particular, the improvements demonstrated in this project enable saturated colors and multimedia "video" rates with a zero-power image hold, thereby overcoming performance barriers that have blocked low power color electronic books from entering the market. For example, this technology could replace a stack of textbooks with a single lightweight color multimedia tablet. The market opportunity is easily in excess of $10B, and will support numerous new U.S. jobs under a business model providing a sustainable economic benefit to the U.S.A. Multi-stable electrofluidic technology is also well suited for both small and large electronic signage applications.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.46K | Year: 2009

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will demonstrate feasibility of a new electronic paper technology that promises substantially improved black and white contrast and bright, viable color operation. The technology, an electrofluidic pixel that uses voltage to move a colored pigment in a fluid, is capable of achieving twice the reflectivity of existing e-paper solutions. This improvement in reflectivity enables the color saturation found in printed media. However, new electrofluidic pixel designs are required to meet the low power requirements of e-paper applications. These applications require bistable switching states with bistable grayscale levels. The Phase I research project will design, fabricate, and demonstrate a 3D pixel structure that imparts zero Young-Laplace pressure in the unpowered state, thereby creating a bistable state. The Phase I design will produce a surface reflectivity exceeding 50%, while using fabrication steps that are compatible with flexible display manufacture. This project will also provide a road map for optimizing the optical films to achieve further reflectivity improvements. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to drive improvements to electronic paper and electronic book technology. The improved reflectivity demonstrated in this project has the potential to produce saturated colors, thereby overcoming performance barrier that has blocked color electronic books from entering the market. More importantly, widespread adoption of electronic paper and electronic books provides significant benefits to the environment by saving millions of trees and reducing the landfill waste stream. The market opportunity could exceed $10B, and will support numerous new U.S. jobs under a business model providing a sustainable economic benefit to the U.S.A. Bistable electrofluidic technology is also well-suited for both small and large electronic signage. In addition to commercial potential, this Phase I SBIR will develop and disseminate a new tool for realizing 3D microfluidic devices, and create a new technology that will increase scientific interest and investment in the growing fields of electrowetting/electrofluidics and flexible displays.


Patent
Gamma Dynamics LLC and University of Cincinnati | Date: 2011-09-29

A device and method of making and using the same. The device includes first and second substrates that are spaced to define a fluid space. Polar and non-polar fluids occupy the fluid space. A first electrode, with a dielectric layer, is positioned on the first substrate and electrically coupled to at least one voltage source, which is configured to supply an electrical bias to the first electrode. The fluid space includes at least one fluid splitting structure that is configured to facilitate the movement of the non-polar fluid into a portion of the polar fluid. Fluid splitting structure assisted movement of the non-polar fluid splits the polar fluid.


Patent
Gamma Dynamics LLC | Date: 2014-07-15

A shading assembly configured to have a first selectable state that is transmissive to more than 40% of solar light and reflects more than 35% of solar heat, a second selectable state that blocks more than 75% of the solar light and transmits more than 50% of the solar heat, and a third selectable state that transmits more than 50% of the solar light and more than 50% of the solar heat.


Trademark
Gamma Dynamics LLC | Date: 2017-01-09

Digital light meter tester; button battery; car switch; car fuse; sunglasses clip on car; camping whistles; compasses; wind speed gauge meter; volt meter; 3d glasses; Cables, electric. Aprons; gaiters; socks; headbands; hats. Ocean balls; Joysticks for video games; Toy building blocks; Inflatable pool toys.


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