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Rzgów, Poland

Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Merecz-Kot D.,University of Lodz | Sobala W.,Gameta Hospital | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Impotence Research | Year: 2016

The clinical significance of sperm DNA damage lies in its association with natural conception rates and also might have a serious consequence on developmental outcome of the newborn. The aim of the present study is to determine whether stress and everyday life factors are associated with sperm DNA damage in adult men. The study population consisted of 286 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 20-300 m ml -1 or with slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20 m ml -1) (WHO, 1999). Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. The sperm chromatin structure assay was assessed using flow cytometry. In the present study, we found evidence for a relationship between sperm DNA damage parameters and everyday life factors. High and medium level of occupational stress and age increase DNA fragmentation index (P=0.03, P=0.004 and P=0.03, respectively). Other lifestyle factors that were positively associated with percentage of immature sperms (high DNA stainability index) included: obesity and cell phone use for more than 10 years (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively). Our findings indicate that stress and lifestyle factor may affect sperm DNA damage. Data from the present study showed a significant effect of age, obesity, mobile phone radiation and occupational stress on sperm DNA damage. As DNA fragmentation represents an extremely important parameter indicative of infertility and potential outcome of assisted reproduction treatment, and most of the lifestyle factors are easily modifiable, the information about factors that may affect DNA damage are important. © 2016 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Wielgomas B.,Medical University of Gdansk | Sobala W.,University of Lodz | And 4 more authors.
Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2015

The present study was designed to investigate whether environmental exposure to pyrethroids was associated with sperm DNA damage. Between January 2008 and April 2011 286 men under 45 years of age with a normal sperm concentration of 15-300106/ml [WHO 2010] were recruited from an infertility clinic in Lodz, Poland. Participants were interviewed and provided urine, saliva, and semen samples. The pyrethroids metabolites: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (CDCCA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (TDCCA), and cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-carboxylic acid (DBCA) were analyzed in the urine using a validated gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. Sperm DNA damage was assessed using a flow cytometry based on sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). A positive association was observed between CDCCA >50th percentile and the percentage of medium DNA fragmentation index (M DFI) and percentage of immature sperms (HDS) (p=0.04, p=0.04 respectively). The level of 3PBA >50th percentile in urine was positively related to the percentage of high DNA fragmentation index (H DFI) (p=0.03). The TDCCA, DBCA levels, and the sum of pyrethroid metabolites were not associated with any sperm DNA damage measures. Our results suggest that environmental pyrethroid exposure may affect sperm DNA damage measures index indicated the reproductive effects of pyrethroid exposure on adult men. In view of the importance of human reproductive health and the widespread usage of pyrethroids, it is important to further investigate these correlations. © 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Sobala W.,University of Lodz | Ligocka D.,University of Lodz | And 3 more authors.
Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2014

The relationship between exposure to lifestyle factors and adverse effects on human reproductive health is debated in the scientific literature and these controversies have increased public and regulatory attention. The aim of the study was to examine the association between modifiable lifestyle factors and main semen parameters, sperm morphology, and sperm chromatin structure. The study population consisted of 344 men who were attending an infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes with normal semen concentration of 20-300 M/ml or with slight oligozoospermia (semen total concentration of 15-20 M/ml) [WHO 1999]. Participants were interviewed and provided semen samples. The interview included questions about demographics, socio-economic status, medical history, lifestyle factors (consumption of alcohol, tobacco, coffee intake, cell phone and sauna usage), and physical activity. The results of the study suggest that lifestyle factors may affect semen quality. A negative association was found between increased body mass index (BMI) and semen volume (p=0.03). Leisure time activity was positively associated with sperm concentration (p=0.04) and coffee drinking with the percentage of motile sperm cells, and the percentage of sperm head and neck abnormalities (p=0.01, p=0.05, and p=0.03, respectively). Drinking red wine 1-3 times per week was negatively related to sperm neck abnormalities (p=0.01). Additionally, using a cell phone more than 10 years decreased the percentage of motile sperm cells (p=0.02). Men who wore boxer shorts had a lower percentage of sperm neck abnormalities (p=0.002) and percentage of sperm with DNA damage (p=0.02). These findings may have important implications for semen quality and lifestyle.


Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Sobala W.,University of Lodz | Radwan P.,Gameta Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2014

Several studies have suggested that human semen quality has declined over past decades and some have associated decline with occupational exposures. Many studies have been conducted in occupational settings, where exposure to occupational pollutants is intense. Our objective was to examine the association between exposure to occupational factors based on an occupational exposure questionnaire, and semen quality parameters (sperm concentration, motility, sperm morphology) and sperm chromatin structure. The study population consisted of 336 men who were attending an infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had a normal semen concentration of ≥15mln/ml according to WHO criteria. All participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. Additionally, a detailed questionnaire about the exposure to occupational factors was performed among the study participants. The results of the study suggest that occupational factors may affect semen quality. The exposure to noise during work was associated with decreased motility and increased DNA damage (p=0.005 and p=0.02, respectively). Exposure to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) decreased sperm concentration and motility (p=0.02 and p=0.03, respectively). Whereas exposure to high temperatures and sitting for more than 6 hours during work was positively associated with DNA fragmentation index (DFI) (p=0.03 and p=0.001, respectively). After applying the correction for multiple comparisons only the exposure to noise and sitting ≥6 hours during work was associated with poorer semen quality (decreased motility and increased DFI, respectively). This study showed associations between self-reported occupational exposures and impaired semen parameters. The occupational exposure questionnaire may be useful in clinical practice for patients and physicians to identify the work factors associated with poorer semen quality. © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Sobala W.,University of Lodz | Ligocka D.,University of Lodz | And 3 more authors.
Annals of Human Biology | Year: 2014

Background and aims: Although psychological stress has been implicated as a cause of idiopathic infertility in both men and women, it has received little scientific attention among males as compared to females. The aim of the study was to examine the association between occupational, life stress, family functioning and semen quality. Methods and results: The study population consisted of 327 men who were attending an infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes. Psychological stress was assessed based on two questionnaires: The Subjective Work Characteristics Questionnaire and the Perceived Stress Scale. The level of satisfaction with family functioning and support was evaluated by means of the APGAR Family Scale. The findings suggest that, on the one hand, exposure to occupational stressors can be negatively associated with semen quality (there was a positive association between stress and the percentage of sperm with DNA damage (p=0.03) and atypical sperm (p=0.05)); on the other hand, there was no correlation between the level of life stress and semen quality indicators. Negative associations were found between satisfaction with family functioning and the percentage of motile sperm cells (p=0.02), VAP (p=0.05), VSL (p=0.05) and VCL (p=0.04). Conclusion: The study indicates that occupational stress can affect male semen quality; however, due to limited data on this issue, the obtained results should be confirmed in longitudinal studies. © 2014 Informa UK Ltd.

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