Gameta Hospital

Rzgów, Poland

Gameta Hospital

Rzgów, Poland

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Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Wielgomas B.,Medical University of Gdańsk | Sobala W.,University of Lodz | And 4 more authors.
Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2015

The present study was designed to investigate whether environmental exposure to pyrethroids was associated with sperm DNA damage. Between January 2008 and April 2011 286 men under 45 years of age with a normal sperm concentration of 15-300106/ml [WHO 2010] were recruited from an infertility clinic in Lodz, Poland. Participants were interviewed and provided urine, saliva, and semen samples. The pyrethroids metabolites: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (CDCCA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (TDCCA), and cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-carboxylic acid (DBCA) were analyzed in the urine using a validated gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. Sperm DNA damage was assessed using a flow cytometry based on sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). A positive association was observed between CDCCA >50th percentile and the percentage of medium DNA fragmentation index (M DFI) and percentage of immature sperms (HDS) (p=0.04, p=0.04 respectively). The level of 3PBA >50th percentile in urine was positively related to the percentage of high DNA fragmentation index (H DFI) (p=0.03). The TDCCA, DBCA levels, and the sum of pyrethroid metabolites were not associated with any sperm DNA damage measures. Our results suggest that environmental pyrethroid exposure may affect sperm DNA damage measures index indicated the reproductive effects of pyrethroid exposure on adult men. In view of the importance of human reproductive health and the widespread usage of pyrethroids, it is important to further investigate these correlations. © 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Sobala W.,University of Lodz | Ligocka D.,University of Lodz | And 3 more authors.
Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2014

The relationship between exposure to lifestyle factors and adverse effects on human reproductive health is debated in the scientific literature and these controversies have increased public and regulatory attention. The aim of the study was to examine the association between modifiable lifestyle factors and main semen parameters, sperm morphology, and sperm chromatin structure. The study population consisted of 344 men who were attending an infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes with normal semen concentration of 20-300 M/ml or with slight oligozoospermia (semen total concentration of 15-20 M/ml) [WHO 1999]. Participants were interviewed and provided semen samples. The interview included questions about demographics, socio-economic status, medical history, lifestyle factors (consumption of alcohol, tobacco, coffee intake, cell phone and sauna usage), and physical activity. The results of the study suggest that lifestyle factors may affect semen quality. A negative association was found between increased body mass index (BMI) and semen volume (p=0.03). Leisure time activity was positively associated with sperm concentration (p=0.04) and coffee drinking with the percentage of motile sperm cells, and the percentage of sperm head and neck abnormalities (p=0.01, p=0.05, and p=0.03, respectively). Drinking red wine 1-3 times per week was negatively related to sperm neck abnormalities (p=0.01). Additionally, using a cell phone more than 10 years decreased the percentage of motile sperm cells (p=0.02). Men who wore boxer shorts had a lower percentage of sperm neck abnormalities (p=0.002) and percentage of sperm with DNA damage (p=0.02). These findings may have important implications for semen quality and lifestyle.


Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Sobala W.,University of Lodz | Radwan P.,Gameta Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2014

Several studies have suggested that human semen quality has declined over past decades and some have associated decline with occupational exposures. Many studies have been conducted in occupational settings, where exposure to occupational pollutants is intense. Our objective was to examine the association between exposure to occupational factors based on an occupational exposure questionnaire, and semen quality parameters (sperm concentration, motility, sperm morphology) and sperm chromatin structure. The study population consisted of 336 men who were attending an infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had a normal semen concentration of ≥15mln/ml according to WHO criteria. All participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. Additionally, a detailed questionnaire about the exposure to occupational factors was performed among the study participants. The results of the study suggest that occupational factors may affect semen quality. The exposure to noise during work was associated with decreased motility and increased DNA damage (p=0.005 and p=0.02, respectively). Exposure to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) decreased sperm concentration and motility (p=0.02 and p=0.03, respectively). Whereas exposure to high temperatures and sitting for more than 6 hours during work was positively associated with DNA fragmentation index (DFI) (p=0.03 and p=0.001, respectively). After applying the correction for multiple comparisons only the exposure to noise and sitting ≥6 hours during work was associated with poorer semen quality (decreased motility and increased DFI, respectively). This study showed associations between self-reported occupational exposures and impaired semen parameters. The occupational exposure questionnaire may be useful in clinical practice for patients and physicians to identify the work factors associated with poorer semen quality. © 2014 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Radwan M.,Gameta Hospital | Jurewicz J.,University of Lodz | Wielgomas B.,Medical University of Gdańsk | Sobala W.,University of Lodz | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine | Year: 2014

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether the environmental exposure to pyrethroids affects semen quality and the level of reproductive hormones in men.Methods: The study population consisted of 334 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 15 to 300 mln/mL. Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. The pyrethroids metabolites-3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (CDCCA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (TDCCA), and cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (DBCA) were analyzed in the urine using a validated gas chromatography ion-trap mass spectrometry method. Copyright © 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.Results: Urinary pyrethroids metabolites levels were significantly associated with an increase in the percentage of sperm with abnormal morphology and decrease in sperm concentration, the level of testosterone, and computer-aided semen analysis parameters.Conclusions: Environmental pyrethroids exposure may affect semen quality and the level of reproductive hormones.


PubMed | Gameta Hospital, National Research Institute of Animal Production and University of Lodz
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of impotence research | Year: 2016

The clinical significance of sperm DNA damage lies in its association with natural conception rates and also might have a serious consequence on developmental outcome of the newborn. The aim of the present study is to determine whether stress and everyday life factors are associated with sperm DNA damage in adult men. The study population consisted of 286 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 20-300mml(-1) or with slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20mml(-1)) (WHO, 1999). Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. The sperm chromatin structure assay was assessed using flow cytometry. In the present study, we found evidence for a relationship between sperm DNA damage parameters and everyday life factors. High and medium level of occupational stress and age increase DNA fragmentation index (P=0.03, P=0.004 and P=0.03, respectively). Other lifestyle factors that were positively associated with percentage of immature sperms (high DNA stainability index) included: obesity and cell phone use for more than 10 years (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively). Our findings indicate that stress and lifestyle factor may affect sperm DNA damage. Data from the present study showed a significant effect of age, obesity, mobile phone radiation and occupational stress on sperm DNA damage. As DNA fragmentation represents an extremely important parameter indicative of infertility and potential outcome of assisted reproduction treatment, and most of the lifestyle factors are easily modifiable, the information about factors that may affect DNA damage are important.


PubMed | Medical University of Gdańsk, Gameta Hospital and University of Lodz
Type: | Journal: Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) | Year: 2016

In recent years, a trend toward a declining proportion of male births has been noted in several, but not all, industrialized countries. The underlying reason for the drop in the sex ratio is unclear, but one theory states that widespread environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals affecting the male reproductive system in a negative manner could be part of the explanation. The present study was designed to investigate whether the urinary phthalate, pyrethroids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons metabolites concentrations were associated with sperm Y:X ratio. The study population consisted of 194 men aged under 45 years of age who attended infertility clinic in Lodz, Poland for diagnostic purposes with normal semen concentration of 20-300 mln/ml or with slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20 mln/ml) (WHO, 1999). The Y:X ratio was assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Urinary concentrations of 1-hydroxypyrene were measured by high performance liquid chromatography, phthalate metabolites were analyzed using a procedure based on the LC-MS/MS methods and metabolites of synthetic pyrethroids were assessed by gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. After adjustment for potential confounders (past diseases, age, abstinence, smoking, alcohol consumption, sperm concentration, motility, morphology) 5OH MEHP, CDCCA to TDCCA and 1-OHP was negatively related to Y:X sperm chromosome ratio (p=0.033, p<0.001, p=0.047 respectively). As this is the first study to elucidate the association between the level of metabolites of widespread environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (phthalates, synthetic pyrethroids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) on sex chromosome ratio in sperm therefore, these findings require further replication in other populations.


PubMed | Gameta Hospital, National Research Institute of Animal Production and University of Lodz
Type: | Journal: American journal of men's health | Year: 2016

Diet is a complex exposure variable, which calls for multiple approaches to examine the relationship between diet and disease risk. To address these issues, several authors have recently proposed studying overall dietary patterns by considering how foods and nutrients are consumed in combinations. The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between dietary patterns, semen quality parameters, and the level of reproductive hormones. The study population consisted of 336 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 20 to 300 mln/ml or slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20 mln/ml). Participants were interviewed, and a semen sample was provided by them. Diet was assessed via food frequency questionnaire, and dietary patterns were identified by factor analysis. Men were classified into three groups according to scores of each dietary pattern: Western, Mixed, or Prudent. A positive association was observed between sperm concentration and Prudent dietary pattern, and level of testosterone and Prudent dietary pattern (p = .05, p = .03, respectively). Additionally, Prudent dietary pattern was identified to decrease the DNA fragmentation index (p = .05). The results were adjusted for sexual abstinence, age, smoking, past diseases, and alcohol consumption. Higher consumption of a Prudent dietary pattern was associated with higher sperm concentration and higher level of testosterone. Sperm chromatin structure was inversely related to higher consumption of a Prudent dietary pattern. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and extend these results to other populations.


PubMed | Gameta Hospital and University of Lodz
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Human fertility (Cambridge, England) | Year: 2015

Possible reproductive toxicants such as occupational factors may affect the normal disjunction of chromosomes during meiosis, thereby altering the number of chromosomes in sperm nuclei. The purpose of the present analysis was to determine whether exposure to occupational factors existing in a contemporary work setting affected sperm aneuploidy. The study population consisted of 212 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes. The men either had a normal semen concentration of 20-300 million/ml or slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20 million/ml) ( WHO 1999 ). All participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. Sperm aneuploidy was assessed using multicolor FISH. After adjustment for potential confounders, positive associations were found between disomy XY18, 18, and sex chromosome disomy and exposure to mechanical vibrations (p = 0.03, p = 0.04, p = 0.03, respectively). In addition, sitting for more than 6 h at work increased X and Y disomy (p = 0.03, p = 0.04, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show a significant effect of occupational factors on sperm aneuploidy. As such, the results need to be confirmed in larger studies.


PubMed | Medical University of Gdańsk, Gameta Hospital and University of Lodz
Type: | Journal: Chemosphere | Year: 2015

The aim of the present study is to determine whether the environmental exposure to pyrethroids was associated with males sperm chromosome disomy. The study population consisted of 195 men who attended the infertility clinic for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 20-30010(6) mL(-1) or slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-2010(6) mL(-1)) (WHO, 1999). Participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. The pyrethroids metabolites: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (CDCCA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (TDCCA) and cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (DBCA) were analysed in the urine using a validated gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. Sperm aneuploidy was assessed using multicolor FISH (DNA probes specific for chromosomes X, Y, 18, 13, 21). Our results showed that CDCCA >50th percentile was associated with disomy of chromosome 18 (p=0.05) whereas the level of TDCCA in urine >50th percentile was related to XY disomy (p=0.04) and disomy of chromosome 21 (p=0.05). Urinary 3PBA level 50 and >50 percentile was related to disomy of sex chromosomes: XY disomy (p=0.05 and p=0.02 respectively), Y disomy (p=0.04 and 0.02 respectively), disomy of chromosome 21 (p=0.04 and p=0.04 respectively) and total disomy (p=0.03 and p=0.04 respectively). Additionally disomy of chromosome 18 was positively associated with urinary level of 3PBA >50 percentile (p=0.03). The results reported here are found that pyrethroids may be a sperm aneugens. These findings may be of concern due to increased pyrethroid use and prevalent human exposure.


PubMed | Gameta Hospital, National Research Institute of Animal Production and University of Lodz
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Annals of human biology | Year: 2016

Ambient air pollution has been associated with a variety of reproductive disorders. However, a limited amount of research has been conducted to examine the association between air pollution and male reproductive outcomes, specifically semen quality.The present study was designed to address the hypothesis that exposure to fluctuating levels of specific air pollutants adversely affects sperm parameters and the level of reproductive hormones.The study population consisted of 327 men who were attending an infertility clinic in od, Poland for diagnostic purposes and who had normal semen concentration of 15-300mln/ml. All participants were interviewed and provided a semen sample. Air quality data were obtained from AirBase database.The statistically significant association was observed between abnormalities in sperm morphology and exposure to all examined air pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, SO2, NOX, CO). Exposure to air pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, CO, NOx) was also negatively associated with the level of testosterone. Additional exposure to PM2.5, PM10 increase the percentage of cells with immature chromatin (HDS).The present study provides suggestive evidence of an association between ambient air pollution and sperm quality. Further research is needed to explore this association in more detail. Individual precise exposure assessment would be needed for more detailed risk characterization.

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