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Yang Z.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN | Yang Z.,China National Institute for Nutrition and Food Safety | Huffman S.L.,University of California at Davis
Maternal and Child Nutrition | Year: 2011

Fortified beverages and supplementary foods, when given during pregnancy, have been shown to have positive effects on preventing maternal anaemia and iron deficiency. Studies show that use of micronutrient fortified supplementary foods, especially those containing milk and/or essential fatty acids during pregnancy, increase mean birthweight by around 60-73g. A few studies have also shown that fortified supplementary foods have impacts on increasing birth length and reducing preterm delivery. Fortification levels have ranged generally from 50% to 100% of the recommended nutrient intake (RNI). Iron, zinc, copper, iodine, selenium, vitamins A, D, E, C, B1, B2, B6, and B12, folic acid, niacin and pantothenic acid are important nutrients that have been included in fortified beverages and supplemental foods for pregnant and lactating women. While calcium has been shown to reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia and maternal mortality, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and manganese can have negative impacts on organoleptic properties, so many products tested have not included these nutrients or have done so in a limited way. Fortified food supplements containing milk and essential fatty acids offer benefits to improving maternal status and pregnancy outcome. Fortified beverages containing only multiple micronutrients have been shown to reduce micronutrient deficiencies such as anaemia and iron deficiency. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Jallier V.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN
Food and nutrition bulletin | Year: 2013

Access to high-grade micronutrients is a recurring challenge that often threatens the long-term sustainability of food fortification programs. To assess the efficiency of the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) Premix Facility in procuring quality, affordable vitamin A for fortification of edible oil in Indonesia. A global approach to procurement of standard items was used by combining volumes across various demand streams in order to reduce the total cost of acquisition through economies of scale. The GAIN Premix Facility undertook a detailed analysis of vitamin A requirements across its existing customer base, which served as a basis for developing a reliable demand forecast. A consolidated, competitive tender was launched that resulted in the setting up of a long-term commercial agreement with the selected supplier to lock in the most competitive price for a given period of time. The direct benefit to oil manufacturers of fortifying with vitamin A is that the cost of fortification went down significantly compared with prices they would have been offered had they ordered vitamin A individually. In Indonesia, this consolidated procurement approach has allowed a 14.5% decrease in the unit price of vitamin A. The GAIN Premix Facility demonstrated its effectiveness in acting as a global procurement platform by aggregating demand across different customers and leveraging improved prices through increased volumes. Building on the success of this effort, the GAIN Premix Facility is replicating this global approach for procurement of other standard items being procured across fortification programs worldwide.


Laillou A.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN
Food and nutrition bulletin | Year: 2013

Vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem worldwide, affecting approximately 190 million preschool-aged children and 19.1 million pregnant women. Fortification of vegetable oils with vitamin A is an effective, low-cost technology to improve vitamin A intake. To examine the potential contribution of fortification of vegetable oils with vitamin A in Indonesia and Malaysia to increasing vitamin A consumption in these two countries and in countries to which oil is exported. Detailed interviews were administered and a desk review was conducted. We also estimated potential vitamin A intakes from fortified vegetable oil. Malaysia and Indonesia are two of the largest producers and exporters of vegetable oil. Fortification of vegetable oil in both countries has the potential to be used as a tool for control of vitamin A deficiency. Both countries have the capacity to export fortified vegetable oil. Vegetable oil fortified at a level of 45 IU/g could provide 18.8% of the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for an Ethiopian woman, 30.9% and 46.9% of the EAR for a Bangladeshi child and woman, respectively, and 17.5% of the EAR for a Cambodian woman. Although concerns about obesity are valid, fortification of existing vegetable oil supplies does not promote overconsumption of oil but rather promotes consumption of vegetable oil of higher nutrient quality. Fortifying vegetable oil on a large scale in Malaysia and Indonesia can reach millions of people globally, including children less than 5 years old. The levels of fortification used are far from reaching the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL). Vegetable oil fortification has the potential to become a global public health intervention strategy.


Laillou A.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN
Food and nutrition bulletin | Year: 2013

In a number of Southeast Asian countries and China, fish sauce and soy sauce produced at the industrial level are fortified with iron. Unfortunately, the food producers and regulatory agencies implementing fortification programs do not always have the capacity to monitor the programs on an ongoing basis. To assess a new portable device for the quantitative measurement of iron content of fortified sauces that could be used to control fortification levels. The linearity, detection limits, and inter- and intraassay variability of this device were assessed on fish sauce and soy sauce fortified with ferrous sulfate, ferrous fumarate, and sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetate (NaFeEDTA); the accuracy of the results was determined by comparing them with the results obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Measurements required a minimum incubation time of 1 hour for iron sulfate or iron fumarate and 24 hours for NaFeEDTA. Linearity of the results ranged from 2 to 10 mg iron/L for ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate and from 1 to 10 mg iron/L for NaFeEDTA, implying the need for proper dilution, as the iron contents of fortified sauce are usually in the range of 150 to 1,000 mg/L. Depending on incubation time, iron compounds, and sauces, the coefficient of variation (CV) of intraassay precision was between 1.5% and 7.6% and the CV of interassay precision was between 2.9% and 7.4%. Comparison with results from atomic absorption spectrophotometry showed high agreement between both methods, with R = 0.926 and R = 0.935 for incubation times of 1 hour and 24 hours, respectively. The Bland-Altman plots showed limits of agreement between the two methods of +/- 70 mg/L in the range of fortification levels tested (100 to 500 mg/L). CONCLUSIONS; This device offers a viable method for field monitoring of iron fortification of soy and fish sauces after incubation times of 1 hour for ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate and 24 hours for NaFeEDTA.


Spohrer R.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN
Food and nutrition bulletin | Year: 2012

Despite the reference to salt for food processing in the original definition of universal salt iodization (USI), national USI programs often do not explicitly address food industry salt. This may affect program impact and sustainability, given the increasing consumption of processed foods in developing countries. To review experience of the use of iodized salt in the food industry globally, and analyze the market context in Bangladesh and Pakistan to test whether this experience may be applicable to inform improved national USI programming in developing countries. A review of relevant international experience was undertaken. In Bangladesh and Pakistan, local rural market surveys were carried out. In Bangladesh, structured face-to-face interviews with bakers and indepth interviews with processed food wholesalers and retailers were conducted. In Pakistan, face-to-face structured interviews were conducted with food retailers and food labels were checked. Experience from industrialized countries reveals impact resulting from the use of iodized salt in the food industry. In Bangladesh and Pakistan, bread, biscuits, and snacks containing salt are increasingly available in rural areas. In Bangladesh, the majority of bakers surveyed claimed to use iodized salt. In Pakistan, 6 of 362 unique product labels listed iodized salt. Successful experience from developed countries needs to be adapted to the developing country context. The increasing availability of processed foods in rural Bangladesh and Pakistan provides an opportunity to increase iodine intake. However, the impact of this intervention remains to be quantified. To develop better national USI programs, further data are required on processed food consumption across population groups, iodine contents of food products, and the contribution of processed foods to iodine nutrition.


Guinot P.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN
Food and nutrition bulletin | Year: 2012

Vitamin and mineral premix is one of the most significant recurring input costs for large-scale food fortification programs. A number of barriers exist to procuring adequate quality premix, including accessing suppliers, volatile prices for premix, lack of quality assurance and monitoring of delivered products, and lack of funds to purchase premix. To develop and test a model to procure premix through a transparent and efficient process in which an adequate level of quality is guaranteed and a financial mechanism is in place to support countries or specific target groups when there are insufficient resources to cover the cost of premix. Efforts focused on premixes used to fortify flour, such as wheat or maize (iron, zinc, B vitamins, and vitamin A), edible oils (vitamins A and D), and other food vehicles, such as fortified complementary foods, complementary food supplements, and condiments. A premix procurement model was set up with three distinct components: a certification process that establishes industry-wide standards and guidelines for premix, a procurement facility that makes premix more accessible to countries and private industry engaged in fortification, and a credit facility mechanism that helps projects finance premix purchases. After three years of operation, 15 premix suppliers and 29 micronutrient manufacturers have been certified, and more than US$23 million worth of premix that met quality standards has been supplied in 34 countries in Africa, Central and Southern Asia, and Eastern Europe, reaching an estimated 242 million consumers. The Premix Facility demonstrated its effectiveness in ensuring access to high-quality premixes, therefore enabling the success of various fortification programs.


Rohner F.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN
Food and nutrition bulletin | Year: 2012

Despite considerable progress made in the past decade through salt iodization programs, over 2 billion people worldwide still have inadequate iodine intake, with devastating consequences for brain development and intellectual capacity. To optimize these programs with regard to salt iodine content, careful monitoring of salt iodine content is essential, but few methods are available to quantitatively measure iodine concentration in a simple, fast, and safe way. We have validated a newly developed device that quantitatively measures the content of potassium iodate in salt in a simple, safe, and rapid way. The linearity, determination and detection limit, and inter- and intra-assay variability of this colorimetric method were assessed and the method was compared with iodometric titration, using salt samples from several countries. Linearity of analysis ranged from 5 to 75 mg/kg iodine, with 1 mg/kg being the determination limit; the intra- and interassay imprecision was 0.9%, 0.5%, and 0.7% and 1.5%, 1.7%, and 2.5% for salt samples with iodine contents of 17, 30, and 55 mg/kg, respectively; the interoperator imprecision for the same samples was 1.2%, 4.9%, and 4.7%, respectively. Comparison with the iodometric method showed high agreement between the methods (R2 = 0.978; limits of agreement, -10.5 to 10.0 mg/kg). The device offers a field- and user-friendly solution to quantifying potassium iodate salt content reliably. For countries that use potassium iodide in salt iodization programs, further validation is required.


Wirth J.P.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN
Food and nutrition bulletin | Year: 2012

Fortification of staple foods has been repeatedly recommended as an effective approach to reduce micronutrient deficiencies. With the increased number of fortification projects globally, there is a need to share practical lessons learned relating to their implementation and responses to project-related and external challenges. To document the achievements, challenges, lessons learned, and management responses associated with national fortification projects in Morocco, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam. Independent end-of-project evaluations conducted for each project served as the primary data source and contain the history of and project activities undertaken for, each fortification project. Other sources, including national policy documents, project reports from the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) and other stakeholders, industry assessments, and peer-reviewed articles, were used to document the current responses to challenges and future project plans. All projects had key achievements related to the development of fortification standards and the procurement of equipment for participating industry partners. Mandatory fortification of wheat flour was a key success in Morocco and Uzbekistan. Ensuring the quality of fortified foods was a common challenge experienced across the projects, as were shifts in consumption patterns and market structures. Adjustments were made to the projects' design to address the challenges faced. National fortification projects are dynamic and must be continually modified in response to specific performance issues and broader shifts in market structure and consumption patterns.


Wheat and maize flours are widely used delivery vehicles for mass fortification. In lower-income countries, most, if not all, national-level cereal flour fortification programs routinely fortify with iron; however, cofortification with other micronutrients is common. Little information is available on the cost implications programs face when considering current fortification practices versus what the World Health Organization (WHO) interim consensus statement recommends. The objectives of the present paper are to provide information on the costs of adding different chemical forms of iron and/or other micronutrients to premix formulations, and to discuss some of the issues that should be considered regarding which micronutrients to include in the premix. Nine countries in Latin America, Africa, and Asia (three countries per region) that currently cofortify with multiple micronutrients including iron were selected based on low (< 75 g/day), medium (75 to 149 g/day), and high (> or = 150 g/day) mean population flour consumption levels. Premix costs per metric ton of flour produced were estimated for improving iron formulations and for following WHO recommendations for other micronutrients. For the selected programs to maintain current premix formulations and improve iron compounds, premix costs would increase by between 155% and 343% when the iron compound was switched from electrolytic iron to sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetate (NaFeEDTA), by 6% to 50% when it was switched from electrolytic iron to ferrous sulfate, and by 4% to 13 when iron addition rates were adjusted without switching the compound. To meet WHO recommendations for other micronutrients, premix costs would increase the most when the amounts of vitamins B12 and A were increased. For programs that currently cofortify with iron and additional micronutrients, the quality of the iron fortificant should not be overlooked simply to be able to afford to add more micronutrients to the premix. Micronutrients should be selected according to population needs, costs, and potential beneficial synergistic reactions the added micronutrients may have.


Yusufali R.,Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition GAIN
Food and nutrition bulletin | Year: 2012

Fortification of staple foods is an effective strategy to deliver and increase the intake of micronutrients in the diet and can reduce micronutrient deficiencies. It is important to ensure that the food vehicle consistently contains adequate amounts of nutrients at the point of consumption for effective impact. This survey aimed to gauge the level of fortification of maize and wheat flour at the retail level compared with staple food fortification regulations in South Africa to better understand the current obstacles to effective delivery of micronutrients through flour fortification and consider approaches to strengthening the program. White bread flour and maize meal samples were collected from retail points across all provinces and analyzed for vitamin A, iron, and nicotinamide, and a database capturing the origins of the sample was populated. Nicotinamide and vitamin A results were compared against each other and evaluated against food regulations. The level of compliance with statutory fortification requirements was low, both for bread flour and for maize meal. There is evidence of insufficient addition of premix as opposed to losses due to vitamin A stability as seen from the strong correlation between vitamin A and nicotinamide in maize meal. The current levels of micronutrients added to maize meal and bread flour are unsatisfactory. This is likely to be because of insufficient addition of premix at the mills. This affects the availability and intake by consumers of fortified product and potentially prevents the desired reduction in vitamin and mineral deficiencies expected from the flour fortification program.

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