Hospital Gabriel Montpied

Clermont-Ferrand, France

Hospital Gabriel Montpied

Clermont-Ferrand, France

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Guinard-Barbier S.,Groupe Hospitalier Broca Cochin Htel Dieu | Guinard-Barbier S.,University of Paris Descartes | Chenevier-Gobeaux C.,Groupe Hospitalier Broca Cochin Htel Dieu | Grabar S.,Groupe Hospitalier Broca Cochin Htel Dieu | And 16 more authors.
Biomarkers | Year: 2011

Background: Mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) increases with severity in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We investigated whether changes of MR-proANP correlated to bacteremia. Methods: 392 adult patients with CAP visiting emergency department from a prospective observational multicenter study. Results: MR-proANP levels increased in patients with positive bacteremia (92.8 pmol/L vs. 84.3 pmol/L, p=0.04). Performance of MR-proANP to detect bacteremia (0.60) was equivalent to CRP (0.59) but less accurate than PCT (0.69). Conclusion: MR-ANP poorly predicts bacteremia in CAP patients. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.


Guinard-Barbier S.,Groupe Hospitalier Broca Cochin Hotel Dieu | Guinard-Barbier S.,University of Paris Descartes | Grabar S.,University of Paris Descartes | Grabar S.,Hospital Cochin | And 16 more authors.
Biomarkers | Year: 2011

Introduction: Mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MRproANP) increases during systemic infections and could possibly correlate with bacteremia. Methods: We determined the characteristics of MRproANP for accuracy to detect positive blood culture. Results: Bacteremia was positive in 58 (15%) of 347 patients. MRproANP levels increased in patients with bacteremia (98.4 pmol/L [interquartile range (IQR) 68.2-153.1] vs. 66.4 pmol/L [IQR 51.0-90.3], p<0.01). Performance of MRproANP to predict bacteremia [AUC=0.69, 95%CI: 0.61-0.77] was equivalent to C-reactive protein (0.66 [95%CI: 0.59-0.74], p=0.53) but less accurate than procalcitonin (0.78 [95%CI: 0.72-0.84], p<0.001). Conclusion: Although MRproANP increased in bacteremic patients with acute pyelonephritis, results of likelihood ratios discarded its use at bedside to predict bacteremia. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.


Hulin M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Hulin M.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Caillaud D.,Hospital Gabriel Montpied | Annesi-Maesano I.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Annesi-Maesano I.,University Pierre and Marie Curie
Indoor Air | Year: 2010

Health effects of indoor pollution have been investigated overall in urban areas. To compare the potential effect of home air pollutants on asthma in urban and rural houses, two case-control populations, composed of children living in the city (32 asthmatics and 31 controls) and in the countryside (24 asthmatics and 27 controls) were included. During 1 week, nitrogen dioxide, fine particles, and volatile organic compounds (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) were assessed at home. Urban dwellings were found to be more polluted than rural ones, with concentrations up to two times higher. In the whole population, exposure to acetaldehyde and toluene was significantly associated with a higher risk of asthma. In the urban population, the association with toluene was significant in children studied during winter, and with toluene, xylenes, and ethylbenzene when cases were restricted to current asthmatics. In rural settings, a relationship between asthma and formaldehyde exposure was observed (OR = 10.7; 95% CI 1.69-67.61). Our findings suggest that daily continuous exposures to pollutants may be implicated in asthma, even in the case of low exposure, as those found in rural areas. Our results could also indicate a specific effect of indoor pollution in the rural environment. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Flamant-Hulin M.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Flamant-Hulin M.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Annesi-Maesano I.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | Annesi-Maesano I.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | Caillaud D.,Hospital Gabriel Montpied
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology | Year: 2013

Background: A fungal index, based on specific microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) emission, was employed and related to asthma in children from rural and urban dwellings after stratification on the children atopic status. Methods: A nested case-control design was used to draw, from 2 cross-sectional surveys, 20 asthmatics and 26 controls living in urban areas, and 24 asthmatics and 25 controls in rural areas. MVOCs levels were assessed in the living-room during one week; during that week, children performed clinical tests and their parents were invited to fill in a questionnaire on respiratory health. Results: According to the objective fungal index, 70.5% of cases and 49.0% of controls were exposed to molds. More children with current asthma had experienced mold exposure in their homes (OR=3.38, 95% CI (1.16; 9.90)), especially amongst children living in rural areas. Atopic status modified this association: exposure to molds was found to be related to current asthma only in non-atopic children (OR=10.42, 95% CI (2.42; 44.81)). Among urban -dwelling children that could be screened at hospital, asthmatic children living in contaminated dwellings had a higher proportion of blood neutrophils and a lower FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) than non-exposed ones. Conclusion: Our findings based on an objective assessment of MVOCs suggest adverse respiratory effects of molds. Our results suggest that when looking at the aetiology of non-atopic asthma, mold exposure should be systematically assessed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

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