Gennimatas General Hospital of Athens

Athens, Greece

Gennimatas General Hospital of Athens

Athens, Greece
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Nieminen M.S.,University of Helsinki | Dickstein K.,University of Stavanger | Fonseca C.,New University of Lisbon | Serrano J.M.,Umae Hospital Of Cardiologia Centro Medico Nacional Siglo Xxi | And 30 more authors.
International Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2015

End of life is an unfortunate but inevitable phase of the heart failure patients' journey. It is often preceded by a stage in the progression of heart failure defined as advanced heart failure, and characterised by poor quality of life and frequent hospitalisations. In clinical practice, the efficacy of treatments for advanced heart failure is often assessed by parameters such as clinical status, haemodynamics, neurohormonal status, and echo/MRI indices. From the patients' perspective, however, quality-of-life-related parameters, such as functional capacity, exercise performance, psychological status, and frequency of re-hospitalisations, are more significant. The effects of therapies and interventions on these parameters are, however, underrepresented in clinical trials targeted to assess advanced heart failure treatment efficacy, and data are overall scarce. This is possibly due to a non-universal definition of the quality-of-life-related endpoints, and to the difficult standardisation of the data collection. These uncertainties also lead to difficulties in handling trade-off decisions between quality of life and survival by patients, families and healthcare providers. A panel of 34 experts in the field of cardiology and intensive cardiac care from 21 countries around the world convened for reviewing the existing data on quality-of-life in patients with advanced heart failure, discussing and reaching a consensus on the validity and significance of quality-of-life assessment methods. Gaps in routine care and research, which should be addressed, were identified. Finally, published data on the effects of current i.v. vasoactive therapies such as inotropes, inodilators, and vasodilators on quality-of-life in advanced heart failure patients were analysed. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Nieminen M.S.,University of Helsinki | Buerke M.,Kardiologie | Parissis J.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Ben-Gal T.,Heart Failure Unit | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Cardiology | Year: 2015

Introduction Heart failure places a significant economic burden on health care. Acute heart failure requires hospitalization and often frequent re-hospitalization in expensive wards where vasoactive rescue therapy is often added on top of standard medications. In these lean times, there is a growing need for cost-effective therapeutic options that supply superior support and in addition shorten the length of stay in hospital and reduce re-hospitalization rates. The inodilator levosimendan represents the latest addition to the vasoactive treatments of acute heart failure patients, and it appears to meet these expectations. Our aim was to answer the question whether the treatment efficacy of levosimendan - when selected as therapy for patients hospitalized for acute heart failure - brings savings to hospitals in various European countries representing different economies. Methods and results We took a conservative approach and selected some a fortiori arguments to simplify the calculations. We selected seven European countries to represent different economies: Italy, Spain, Greece, Germany, Sweden, Finland and Israel. Data on the costs of medications and on the cost per day were collected and fed in a simple algorithm to detect savings. These saving varied from country to country, from a minimum of €0.50 in Germany to a maximum of €354.64 in Sweden. Conclusions The use of levosimendan as a therapy for patients hospitalized for acute heart failure provides a net saving to hospitals driven by a reduction in the length of hospital stay. This finding is true in each of the countries considered in this study. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Moschos M.M.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Tagaris G.,Gennimatas General Hospital of Athens | Markopoulos I.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Margetis I.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Ophthalmology | Year: 2011

PURPOSE. To investigate the anatomic and electrophysiologic changes of the macula and the optic nerve in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) without visual impairment. METHODS. Thirty-two eyes of 16 patients with PD (group A) without visual impairment were tested. Visual acuity was 20/20 or better and visual fields as well as color vision testing results were normal. Also, no retinal lesions were assessed. Patients in group B (40 eyes of 20 patients) were age- and sex-matched control subjects. All study participants underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination, multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) recording, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan. Thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) along a 3.4-mm-diameter circle centered on the optic nerve head was evaluated using third-generation OCT. RESULTS. The mean P1-response density amplitude of ring 1 of mfERG was 136.69 nV/deg2 in patients with PD and 294 nV/deg2 in control subjects and the difference was highly significant. On the contrary, these values in ring 2 and 3 did not differ statistically between controls and patients with PD. The mean inferior and temporal RNFL thickness was significantly lower in patients with PD than in control subjects (p<0.0001 and p=0.0045, respectively). CONCLUSIONS. In patients with PD with normal vision, we found a decrease in the electrical activity of the fovea as well as in the thickness of the RNFL. Multifocal electroretinogram and OCT scan objectively detect early subclinical PD-associated visual functional impairment. © 2010 Wichtig Editore.


PubMed | Kardiologie, Uppsala University, University of Helsinki, Orion Pharma and 5 more.
Type: | Journal: International journal of cardiology | Year: 2015

Heart failure places a significant economic burden on health care. Acute heart failure requires hospitalization and often frequent re-hospitalization in expensive wards where vasoactive rescue therapy is often added on top of standard medications. In these lean times, there is a growing need for cost-effective therapeutic options that supply superior support and in addition shorten the length of stay in hospital and reduce re-hospitalization rates. The inodilator levosimendan represents the latest addition to the vasoactive treatments of acute heart failure patients, and it appears to meet these expectations. Our aim was to answer the question whether the treatment efficacy of levosimendan - when selected as therapy for patients hospitalized for acute heart failure - brings savings to hospitals in various European countries representing different economies.We took a conservative approach and selected some a fortiori arguments to simplify the calculations. We selected seven European countries to represent different economies: Italy, Spain, Greece, Germany, Sweden, Finland and Israel. Data on the costs of medications and on the cost per day were collected and fed in a simple algorithm to detect savings. These saving varied from country to country, from a minimum of 0.50 in Germany to a maximum of 354.64 in Sweden.The use of levosimendan as a therapy for patients hospitalized for acute heart failure provides a net saving to hospitals driven by a reduction in the length of hospital stay. This finding is true in each of the countries considered in this study.


Kontraros M.,Sismanoglio Hospital of Attiki | Varkarakis I.,Sismanoglio Hospital of Attiki | Ntoumas K.,Gennimatas General Hospital of Athens | Deliveliotis C.,Sismanoglio Hospital of Attiki
Urologia Internationalis | Year: 2013

Introduction: We assessed the pathological characteristics of the radical prostatectomy specimen, the rate of biochemical failure and the functional outcome after surgery, in terms of incontinence and erectile dysfunction rate, in patients on statin medication. Materials and Methods: A total of 588 patients with a mean age 65.2 years (SD = 5.7 years) participated in the study. All patients were contacted and interviewed. Results: Users who had been on statin medication for more than 2 years had lower levels of preoperative serum PSA (p = 0.034), a 2.76 times greater likelihood of being staged as pT3a to pT3b rather than pT2a to pT2c, and a 5.39 times greater likelihood of having a postoperative Gleason score equal to seven or more. Positive surgical margins and urinary incontinence were not significantly associated with statin use. The probability of erectile dysfunction was significantly greater for statin users. Conclusion: Statin medication was associated with a statistically significantly lower PSA value and an increased rate of high Gleason score and pathologic stage in patients receiving medication for more than 2 years. Statins were found to be an independent predictor of recurrence. Lastly, statin users were more likely to present with preoperative and postoperative erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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