Scientific Institute G Gaslini

Genova, Italy

Scientific Institute G Gaslini

Genova, Italy
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Falcini F.,University of Florence | La Torre F.,A Perrino Hospital | Vittadello F.,University of Padua | Rigante D.,University Cattolica Sacro Cuore | And 10 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology | Year: 2014

Objective: Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare vasculitis in childhood and poor information is known about its long-term outcome. Our aim was to describe the clinical features, at onset and during the disease course, of childhood- onset PAN and identify a potential correlation with persistent organ damage and worse outcome in a cohort of paediatric patients with a confirmed diagnosis of PAN. Methods: A retrospective collection of demographic and clinical data of 52 Caucasian children diagnosed with PAN, fulfilling the EULAR/PRES diagnostic criteria, recruited from eight paediatric rheumatologic centres and one transition unit, was performed. A statistical correlation was made between clinical involvement at onset or during the overall disease course and patients' final outcome. Results: Data from 52 patients (31 males, 21 females) were collected: their mean age at onset was 7.9 years (median 6.3) and mean follow-up period was 6.2 years (median 5.4). At the last follow-up visit, 27 patients (51.9%) were off therapy in clinical remission, 17 (32.7%) were in clinical remission while on medication, and 6 (11.6%) had a persistent or relapsing disease course. Two patients (3.8%) deceased because of severe cerebral involvement. Cranial nerve palsy during the disease course was significantly correlated with a worse prognosis (p=0.011). The presence of nephrogenic hypertension at onset and seizures during the disease course were significantly associated with the development of irreversible organ damage (p= 0.040 and 0.011, respectively). Conclusion: Childhood PAN is a severe disease with substantial risk of long-term morbidities. In our cohort of patients the worst outcome was significantly correlated with renal and neurological involvement. © Clinical and Experimental Rrheumatology 2014.


Senes F.M.,Scientific Institute G Gaslini | Catena N.,Scientific Institute G Gaslini
Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics Part B | Year: 2012

Diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures of the humerus are relatively frequent in children. The treatment is often conservative, even in the case of displaced fractures for the high rate of spontaneous recovery of these fractures. The limits of nonsurgical treatment and its applications as well as the type of surgical treatment are controversial issues in the literature. The aim of this study is to review a series of metaphyseal and diaphyseal fractures of the humerus treated with intramedullary osteosynthesis, to discuss the results obtained and the problems found, and to propose some parameters that should be taken into account to choose the most appropriate osteosynthesis. The retrospective study was performed on a group of 105 proximal and distal metaphyseal fractures and of displaced diaphyseal fractures of the humerus (excluding epiphyseal trauma, supracondylar fractures, and pathologic fractures) treated from 2001 to 2005. Out of a total of 105 patients, only 22 had fracture reduction under anesthesia, followed by intramedullary osteosynthesis; in 11 cases, intramedullary osteosynthesis was performed using Kirschner wires and in the remaining 11 elastic nails were used. In all treated patients, fracture healing was achieved. In the patients treated with Kirschner wires, no complications were observed, whereas in the patients treated with intramedullary nails, there were three cases with involvement of the skin and subcutaneous layers at the nail insertion site and one case of temporary paralysis of the radial nerve disappearing spontaneously after 2 months. Considering the results obtained and the low number of technique-related complications (low anesthesiologic and infectious risk), we can conclude that intramedullary osteosynthesis is a simple, safe, and rapid method suitable at any age in childhood. Level of evidence: level IV © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


PubMed | Scientific Institute G Gaslini
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of pediatric orthopedics. Part B | Year: 2012

Diaphyseal and metaphyseal fractures of the humerus are relatively frequent in children. The treatment is often conservative, even in the case of displaced fractures for the high rate of spontaneous recovery of these fractures. The limits of nonsurgical treatment and its applications as well as the type of surgical treatment are controversial issues in the literature. The aim of this study is to review a series of metaphyseal and diaphyseal fractures of the humerus treated with intramedullary osteosynthesis, to discuss the results obtained and the problems found, and to propose some parameters that should be taken into account to choose the most appropriate osteosynthesis. The retrospective study was performed on a group of 105 proximal and distal metaphyseal fractures and of displaced diaphyseal fractures of the humerus (excluding epiphyseal trauma, supracondylar fractures, and pathologic fractures) treated from 2001 to 2005. Out of a total of 105 patients, only 22 had fracture reduction under anesthesia, followed by intramedullary osteosynthesis; in 11 cases, intramedullary osteosynthesis was performed using Kirschner wires and in the remaining 11 elastic nails were used. In all treated patients, fracture healing was achieved. In the patients treated with Kirschner wires, no complications were observed, whereas in the patients treated with intramedullary nails, there were three cases with involvement of the skin and subcutaneous layers at the nail insertion site and one case of temporary paralysis of the radial nerve disappearing spontaneously after 2 months. Considering the results obtained and the low number of technique-related complications (low anesthesiologic and infectious risk), we can conclude that intramedullary osteosynthesis is a simple, safe, and rapid method suitable at any age in childhood.level IV.

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