Knowledge and Technology Co.

Tokyo, Japan

Knowledge and Technology Co.

Tokyo, Japan
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Noujeim M.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | Prihoda T.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | McDavid W.D.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | Ogawa K.,Hosei University | And 4 more authors.
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology | Year: 2011

Objectives: The purpose of the study was to compare the image generated by a classic panoramic machine equipped with a cadmium telluride sensor capable of digital tomosynthesis and special software with images produced by other popular panoramic X-ray machines using a charge-coupled device and native software for image capture. Methods: Panoramic images were made using a phantom of a human skull on Planmeca ProMax, Planmeca EC Proline, Kodak 8000 and PC-1000. With the last machine we used the PanoACT® software to adjust the entire arch and to adjust the image in selected regions of interest (ROIs). Ten viewers evaluated the images and provided the viewer data. ANOVA for repeated measures was used to compare the means by pairwise comparisons of means. Results: The image of the entire arch adjusted by the PanoACT® software was statistically superior to the images produced by other machines. The images generated and individually adjusted by PanoACT® were statistically superior to all other images. Conclusions: The image generated by the cadmium telluride sensor has great potential and can be processed to create superior images to those taken with other machines. Furthermore, the ROI individual images enhanced by the PanoACT® were superior to the entire arch adjusted by the same software. © 2011 The British Institute of Radiology.


Ogawa K.,Hosei University | Langlais R.P.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | McDavid W.D.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | Noujeim M.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | And 4 more authors.
Dentomaxillofacial Radiology | Year: 2010

The objective of this study was to develop a new practical method to reconstruct a high-quality panoramic image in which radiographers would be free from the onerous task of correctly locating the patient's jaws within the image layer of the panoramic unit. In addition, dentists would be able to freely select any panoramic plane to be reconstructed after the acquisition of the raw scan data. A high-speed data acquisition device was used with a CdTe (cadmium telluride) semiconductor detector and a sophisticated digital signal-processing technique based on tomosynthesis was developed. The system processes many vertical strip images acquired with the detector and generates a high-resolution and high-contrast image. To apply the tomosynthesis technique to the acquired strip images correctly, the actual movement of the panoramic unit was measured, including the X-ray tube and detector, in a scan using a calibration phantom and the authors generated a shift amount table needed for the shift-andadd tomosynthesis operation. The results of the experiments with a PanoACT-1000 panoramic unit, which was a PC-1000® panoramic unit fitted with a high frame rate semiconductor detector SCAN-300FPC®, demonstrated the capability of a tomosynthesis technique which, when applied to the strip images of a dry skull phantom, could change the location and inclination of an imaging plane. This system allowed the extraction of an optimum-quality panoramic image regardless of irregularities in patient positioning. Moreover, the authors could freely reconstruct a fine image of an arbitrary plane with different parameters from those used in the original data acquisition to study fine anatomical details in specific locations. © 2010 The British Institute of Radiology.

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