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PubMed | PXE International, Ruhr University Bochum, Furst Medical Laboratory Oslo and University of Oslo
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Molecular genetics & genomic medicine | Year: 2015

Single mutations in the ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCC6) gene (OMIM 603234) are known to cause the rare autosomal recessive disease pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE). Recently, we have found that copy number variations (CNVs) in pseudogenes of the ABCC6 gene are quite common. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and possible contribution of CNV in ABCC6 and its pseudogenes in PXE. Genomic DNA from 212 PXE individuals were examined for copy number by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and compared with healthy individuals. The frequency of PXE individuals with any CNV was higher than in healthy individuals. The majority of variation comprised known and possibly new deletions in the ABCC6 gene and duplications of the ABCC6P1 and ABCC6P2 genes. ABCC6 deletions and ABCC6P2 duplications were not observed in 142 healthy individuals. In conclusion, by pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR, we were able to detect known and possibly new deletions in the ABCC6 gene that may have caused the PXE phenotype. Pyrosequencing may be used in PXE patients who have obtained incomplete genotype from conventional techniques. The frequency of ABCC6P2 pseudogene duplication was more common in PXE patients than healthy individuals and may affect the PXE phenotype.


PubMed | Furst Medical Laboratory Oslo
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in psychiatry | Year: 2012

The A-subclass of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters comprises 12 structurally related members of the evolutionarily highly conserved superfamily of ABC transporters. ABCA transporters represent a subgroup of full-size multispan transporters of which several members have been shown to mediate the transport of a variety of physiologic lipid compounds across membrane barriers. The importance of ABCA transporters in human disease is documented by the observations that so far four members of this protein family (ABCA1, ABCA3, ABCA4, ABCA12) have been causatively linked to monogenetic disorders including familial high-density lipoprotein deficiency, neonatal surfactant deficiency, degenerative retinopathies, and congenital keratinization disorders. Recent research also point to a significant contribution of several A-subfamily ABC transporters to neurodegenerative diseases, in particular Alzheimers disease (AD). This review will give a summary of our current knowledge of the A-subclass of ABC transporters with a special focus on brain lipid homeostasis and their involvement in AD.

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