Greenville, SC, United States
Greenville, SC, United States

Furman University is a private, coeducational liberal arts college in Travelers Rest, South Carolina, United States, slightly north of Greenville, the city it is normally associated with by campus address and brand identity. Furman is South Carolina's oldest private university. Founded in 1826, Furman enrolls approximately 2,700 undergraduate students on its 750-acre campus. The university was named for Richard Furman of Charleston, SC, a prominent minister and president of the Triennial Convention, the first Baptist convention in America.Furman offers majors and programs in 42 subjects. Most of Furman's 2,700 undergraduates are from the South Atlantic region, but 46 states and 53 foreign countries are represented in its student population. Furman is a member of the Associated Colleges of the South. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Raisa Ahmad was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which she conducted research and prepared memos for patent litigation cases involving software and security patents, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical devices.  In addition, she has experience preparing claim construction charts, invalidity contentions, and Lanham Act standing memos.  Prior to law school, she was a student engineer and conducted electric-cell substrate impedance sensing analysis for the Center for the Convergence of Physical and Cancer Biology.  Ahmad received her J.D. from the University of Arizona College of Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor for the Arizona Law Review and received the Dean's Achievement Award Scholarship.  She received her B.S.E., magna cum laude, in biomedical engineering from Arizona State University in 2011.  She is admitted to practice in Texas. Brian Apel practices patent litigation, including post-grant proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  He has worked for clients in the mechanical, electrical, and chemical industries and has experience in pre-suit diligence including opinion work, discovery, damages, summary judgment, and appeals.  Apel also has experience in patent prosecution, employment discrimination, and First Amendment law.  Before law school, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy.  Apel received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Michigan Law School in 2016 and his B.A., with honors, in chemistry from Northwestern University in 2008.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota, the U.S. District Court of Minnesota, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Zoya Kovalenko Brooks focuses her practice on patent litigation, including working on teams for one of the largest high-tech cases in the country pertaining to data transmission and memory allocation technologies.  She was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  While in law school, she served as a legal extern at The Coca-Cola Company in the IP group.  Prior to attending law school, she was an investigator intern at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, where she investigated over 20 potential discrimination cases.  Brooks received her J.D., high honors, Order of the Coif, from Emory University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor for Emory Law Journal and her B.S., high honors, in applied mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Georgia. Holly Chamberlain focuses on patent prosecution in a variety of areas including the biomedical, mechanical, and electromechanical arts.  She was previously a summer associate with the firm.  She received her J.D. from Boston College Law School in 2016 where she was an editor of Intellectual Property and Technology Forum and her B.S. in biological engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Thomas Chisena previously was a summer associate with the firm where he worked on patent, trade secret, and trademark litigation.  Prior to attending law school, he instructed in biology, environmental science, and anatomy & physiology.  Chisena received his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where he was executive editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, Vol. 37.  He also received his Wharton Certificate in Business Management in December 2015.  He received his B.S. in biology from Pennsylvania State University in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Claire Collins was a legal intern for the Middlesex County District Attorney's Office during law school.  She has experience researching and drafting motions and legal memorandums.  Collins received her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2016 where she was a Dillard Fellow, her M.A. from Texas A&M University in 2012, and her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 2006.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts. Ronald Golden, III previously served as a courtroom deputy to U.S. District Judge Leonard P. Stark and U.S. Magistrate Judge Mary Pat Thynge.  He received his J.D. from Widener University School of Law in 2012 where he was on the staff of Widener Law Review and was awarded "Best Overall Competitor" in the American Association for Justice Mock Trial.  He received his B.A. from Stockton University in political science and criminal justice in 2005.  He is admitted to practice in Delaware and New Jersey. Dr. Casey Kraning-Rush was previously a summer associate with the firm, where she focused primarily on patent litigation.  She received her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where she was managing editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and awarded "Best Advocate" and "Best Appellee Brief" at the Western Regional of the AIPLA Giles Rich Moot Court.  She earned her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2013 and has extensive experience researching cellular and molecular medicine.  She received her M.S. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2012 and her B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Butler University in 2008.  She is admitted to practice in Delaware. Alana Mannigé was previously a summer associate with the firm and has worked on patent prosecution, patent litigation, trademark, and trade secret matters.  During law school, she served as a judicial extern to the Honorable Judge James Donato of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.  She also worked closely with biotech startup companies as part of her work at the UC Hastings Startup Legal Garage.  Prior to attending law school, Mannigé worked as a patent examiner at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  She received her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor of Hastings Science & Technology Law Journal.  She received her M.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 2010 and her B.A., cum laude, in chemistry from Clark University in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in California and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Will Orlady was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he collaborated to research and brief a matter on appeal to the Federal Circuit.  He also analyzed novel issues related to inter partes review proceedings, drafted memoranda on substantive patent law issues, and crafted infringement contentions.  During law school, Orlady was a research assistant to Professor Kristin Hickman, researching and writing on administrative law.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2016 where he was lead articles editor of the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science and Technology and his B.A. in neuroscience from the University of Southern California in 2012.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota and the U.S. District Court of Minnesota. Jessica Perry previously was a summer associate and law clerk with the firm, where she worked on patent and trademark litigation.  During law school, she was an IP & licensing analyst, in which she assisted with drafting and tracking material transfer agreement and inter-institutional agreements.  She also worked with the Boston University Civil Litigation Clinic representing pro bono clients with unemployment, social security, housing, and family law matters.  Prior to law school, she was a senior mechanical design engineer for an aerospace company.  She received her J.D. from Boston University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor of the Journal of Science and Technology Law, her M.Eng. in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2009, and her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Taufiq Ramji was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he researched legal issues that related to ongoing litigation and drafted responses to discovery requests and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office actions.  Prior to attending law school, Ramji worked as a software developer.  He received his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2016.  He is admitted to practice in California. Charles Reese has worked on matters before various federal district courts, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.  His litigation experience includes drafting dispositive, evidentiary, and procedural motions; arguing in federal district court; and participating in other stages of litigation including discovery, appeal, and settlement negotiation.  Previously, he was a summer associate with the firm.  He received his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Harvard Law Review, his A.M. in organic and organometallic chemistry from Harvard University in 2012, and his B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Furman University in 2010.  He is admitted to practice in Georgia and the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Ethan Rubin was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  During law school, he worked at a corporation's intellectual property department in which he prepared and prosecuted patents relating to data storage systems.  He also worked as a student attorney, advocating for local pro bono clients on various housing and family law matters.  Rubin received his J.D., cum laude, from Boston College Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Boston College Law Review, his M.S. in computer science from Boston University in 2013, and his B.A., magna cum laude, in criminal justice from George Washington University in 2011.  He is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Pooya Shoghi focuses on patent prosecution, including portfolio management, application drafting, client counseling, and standard essential patent development.  Prior to joining the firm, he was a patent practitioner at a multinational technology company, where he was responsible for the filing and prosecution of U.S. patent applications.  During law school, he was a legal intern at a major computer networking technology company, where he focused on issues of intellectual property licensing in the software arena.  He received his J.D., with honors, from Emory University School of Law in 2014 where he was executive managing editor of Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review.  He received his B.S., summa cum laude, in computer science (2015) and his B.A., summa cum laude, in political science (2011) from Georgia State University.  He is admitted to practice in New York and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Tucker Terhufen focuses his practice on patent litigation in federal district courts as well as before the International Trade Commission for clients in the medical devices, life sciences, chemical, and electronics industries.  Prior to joining Fish, he served as judicial extern to the Honorable David G. Campbell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona and to the Honorable Mary H. Murguia of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from Arizona State University, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law in 2016 where he was note and comment editor of Arizona State Law Journal and received a Certificate in Law, Science, and Technology with a specialization in Intellectual Property.  He received his B.S.E., summa cum laude, in chemical engineering from Arizona State University.  He is admitted to practice in California. Laura Whitworth was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, she served as a judicial intern for the Honorable Judge Jimmie V. Reyna of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  She received her J.D., cum laude, from American University Washington College of Law in 2016 where she was senior federal circuit editor of American University Law Review and senior patent editor of Intellectual Property Brief.  She received her B.S. in chemistry from the College of William & Mary in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Virginia, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Jack Wilson was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, he served as a judicial extern for the Honorable Mark Davis of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  Prior to attending law school, he served in the United States Army.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, from William & Mary Law School in 2016 where he was on the editorial staff of William & Mary Law Review and his B.S. in computer engineering from the University of Virginia in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Virginia and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Fish & Richardson is a global patent prosecution, intellectual property litigation, and commercial litigation law firm with more than 400 attorneys and technology specialists in the U.S. and Europe.  Our success is rooted in our creative and inclusive culture, which values the diversity of people, experiences, and perspectives.  Fish is the #1 U.S. patent litigation firm, handling nearly three times as many cases than its nearest competitor; a powerhouse patent prosecution firm; a top-tier trademark and copyright firm; and the #1 firm at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, with more cases than any other firm.  Since 1878, Fish attorneys have been winning cases worth billions in controversy – often by making new law – for the world's most innovative and influential technology leaders.  For more information, visit https://www.fr.com or follow us at @FishRichardson. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fish--richardson-announces-18-recent-associates-300447237.html


Beymer-Farris B.A.,Furman University | Bassett T.J.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign
Global Environmental Change | Year: 2012

Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) is being proclaimed as "a new direction in forest conservation" (Anglesen, 2009: 125). This financial incentives-based climate change mitigation strategy proposed by the UNEP, World Bank, GEF and environmental NGOs seeks to integrate forests into carbon sequestration schemes. Its proponents view REDD+ as part of an adaptive strategy to counter the effects of global climate change. This paper combines the theoretical approaches of market environmentalism and environmental narratives to examine the politics of environmental knowledge that are redefining socio-nature relations in the Rufiji Delta, Tanzania to make mangrove forests amenable to markets. Through a case study of a "REDD-readiness" climate change mitigation and adaptation project, we demonstrate how a shift in resource control and management from local to global actors builds upon narratives of environmental change (forest loss) that have little factual basis in environmental histories. We argue that the proponents of REDD+ (Tanzanian state, aid donors, environmental NGOs) underestimate the agency of forest-reliant communities who have played a major role in the making of the delta landscape and who will certainly resist the injustices they are facing as a result of this shift from community-based resource management to fortress conservation. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Wagenknecht P.S.,Furman University | Ford P.C.,University of California at Santa Barbara
Coordination Chemistry Reviews | Year: 2011

Transition metal complexes are vital components in a wide range of photooptical applications; these range from targeted drug delivery to devices for the conversion of solar energy to electrical and/or stored chemical energy. Metal centered (MC) ligand field excited states play important roles in the photophysics of those complexes having partially filled d-orbitals. This review offers a broad perspective on key investigations that have characterized the chemistry and physics of MC excited states in d3 and d6 transition metal complexes. It will also illustrate the impact of these excited states on various photooptical applications and highlight efforts to understand, control, and tune these MC excited states in the context of such applications. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Stetler C.,Furman University | Miller G.E.,University of British Columbia
Psychosomatic Medicine | Year: 2011

Objectives: To summarize quantitatively the literature comparing hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function between depressed and nondepressed individuals and to describe the important sources of variability in this literature. These sources include methodological differences between studies, as well as demographic or clinical differences between depressed samples. Methods: The current study used meta-analytic techniques to compare 671 effect sizes (cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, or corticotropin-releasing hormone) across 361 studies, including 18,454 individuals. Results: Although depressed individuals tended to display increased cortisol (d = 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.66) and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels (d = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.16-0.41), they did not display elevations in corticotropin-releasing hormone (d = 0.02; 95% CI, -0.47-0.51). The magnitude of the cortisol effect was reduced by almost half (d = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.21-0.45) when analyses were limited to studies that met minimal methodological standards. Gender did not significantly modify any HPA outcome. Studies that included older hospitalized individuals reported significantly greater cortisol differences between depressed and nondepressed groups compared with studies with younger outpatient samples. Important cortisol differences also emerged for atypical, endogenous, melancholic, and psychotic forms of depression. Conclusions: The current study suggests that the degree of HPA hyperactivity can vary considerably across patient groups. Results are consistent with HPA hyperactivity as a link between depression and increased risk for conditions, such as diabetes, dementia, coronary heart disease, and osteoporosis. Such a link is strongest among older inpatients who display melancholic or psychotic features of depression. Copyright © 2011 by the American Psychosomatic Society.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY | Award Amount: 45.95K | Year: 2015

Wealth is a critical determinant of well-being. Understanding how people gain access to wealth is therefore critically important in efforts to eradicate poverty and promote well-being. Research among marginalized populations within the United States suggests that restricted access to material wealth and formal education results in risk pooling by sharing limited resources through kin and friendship networks. But those same networks may also restrict individual access to material wealth and thereby inhibit economic mobility. Understanding how social networks either buffer against risk or impede access to the forms of wealth most closely associated with well-being is necessary for policy makers and social scientists who wish to understand the causes and consequences of poverty and associated social problems. Therefore, the research supported by this award will investigate the relationship between economic development and a range of wealth types, including material wealth, health, education, and social networks.

The research will be undertaken by Dr. Siobhan Mattison (University of New Mexico), Dr. Tami Blumenfield Kedar (Furman University), and Dr. Mary Shenk (University of Missouri). To understand how various forms of wealth interact with each other and with health to affect well-being, the team has designed a comparative study in two societies where access to material wealth, education, and healthcare is rapidly changing and altering local social networks. The study populations comprise two small-scale agricultural populations, the Mosuo of Southwest China and the villagers of Matlab, a rural district in Bangladesh. In both places, formerly subsistence-based populations are rapidly becoming integrated with regional, national, and international markets in labor and goods. This provides a natural experiment that allows them explore how recent and ongoing shifts in labor and educational opportunities, family systems, and demographic processes affect wealth and well-being. The researchers will conduct demographic and social network surveys to collect economic and social information, take anthropometric measures to assess health, and conduct focus groups, in-depth interviews, and short video interviews to examine local interpretations of wealth and well-being. The comparative approach employed by the study will allow an understanding of how different social norms and institutions act to either help or limit access to changing forms of wealth. Findings will also show whether these norms are protective or harmful with respect to well-being in different socio-economic contexts. The results of this study will provide a detailed understanding of how individual-level and larger-level social constraints affect the distribution of wealth and well-being in economies undergoing economic development, thus providing a useful model for understanding the opportunities and challenges affecting people struggling to thrive in the United States and around the world. The project is jointly funded by the Cultural Anthropology Program, the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), and the Office of International Science and Engineering.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2014

In this project funded by the Chemical Synthesis Program of the Chemistry Division, Professor Paul Wagenknecht of the Department of Chemistry at Furman University will develop new classes of transition metal alkynyl complexes with interesting optoelectronic properties. The goal of this research is to exploit the characteristics of these transition metal alkynyl complexes for the development of optoelectronic devices, namely near-infrared luminescent sensors, organic light emitting diodes, and systems for the conversion of solar energy into stored chemical energy or electricity (e.g. dye-sensitized solar cells). In addition, this project will provide excellent training of undergraduate, masters, and postdoctoral students in the area of device chemistry.

Transition metal alkynyl complexes display a rich array of photophysical properties where substituted alkynyl ligands can be used both for the tuning of excited states and as conduits for electron- and energy-transfer. The proposed syntheses include modifications designed to probe the relationship between excited state photophysics and molecular architecture. In this project, three classes of new transition metal alkynyl complexes will be prepared to answer the following questions: 1) Can alkynyl-diimine ligands be used to facilitate Cr(III) sensitization of near-infrared lanthanide emission and how is the rate of the Cr to Ln energy transfer affected by the molecular architecture? 2) How does the inclusion of the high field strength trifluoropropynyl ligand impact the excited states of emissive complexes of interest for organic light emitting diodes? 3) Can the redox properties of the Fe(II) to Ti(IV) metal-to-metal charge-transfer excited state in alkynyl bridged Ti(IV)-Fe(II) assemblies be controlled and exploited for the conversion of solar energy into stored chemical energy?


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 600.00K | Year: 2012

Furman University is directing a science-based scholarship program through the NSF S-STEM funding mechanism providing 15-21 financial aid awards of up to $40,000/student over a period of five years. The need for such a science-focused initiative targeting South Carolina students from underrepresented minority (URM) groups is acute, as enrollment of African-American students in public K-12 schools approaches 40%, but the annual number of Ph.D. awards in STEM fields within this group is historically less than 5%. In this context, Furman has an outstanding record of matriculating undergraduates from all backgrounds into STEM-based graduate programs, and the SOAR (Science Opportunities, Activities and Resources) Scholars initiative provides critical support for students for whom the cost of attendance would be a hardship. A primary goal of this award is thus establishing Furman as a financially accessible option to a larger fraction of talented students, particularly those from regional underserved and/or URM populations. Furmans S-STEM SOAR Scholars are students expressing intent to major in Chemistry or Biology, recruited and selected based on financial need, demonstrated academic merit, and outcomes from on-campus interviews. SOAR Scholars are benefitting from a host of program activities including a mandatory pre-college bridge experience offered immediately prior to the freshman year, weekly interdisciplinary seminars, opportunities for science-based community outreach through established programs directed at disadvantaged populations, and guaranteed placement into (optional) on-campus paid summer research experiences. Additional supporting mechanisms aimed at sustaining high rates of retention and graduation among SOAR Scholars include peer mentoring programs, regular meetings with permanently assigned secondary advisors, free on-campus tutoring and the active participation of Furmans Office of Multicultural Affairs.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: MAJOR RESEARCH INSTRUMENTATION | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2016

With this award Professor George Shields from Bucknell University and colleagues Marc Zimmer (Connecticut College), Carol Parish (University of Richmond) and Maria Gomez (Mount Holyoke College) have acquired a computer cluster to be shared by a large consortium of primarily undergraduate universities and colleges referred to as MERCURY (Molecular Education and Research Consortium in Undergraduate computational ChemistRY). The cluster is used in computational chemistry research projects. These projects employ theoretical chemistry programs and algorithms or processes using principles from quantum mechanics or molecular mechanics (often called molecular dynamics simulations). The computations are used to predict and understand a wide range of properties of molecules such as their acidity, chemical reaction mechanisms such as those that lead to the production of tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radicals, biochemistry questions such as the binding of small molecules to proteins and even the study of environmental problems such as the chemistry of steroids that are common contaminants in surface and wastewater. The consortium involves 27 computational chemists from 24 primarily undergraduate institutions. The acquisition has a broad impact on the training of undergraduate research students who are incorporated into the workforce or those who attend graduate and professional schools.

The proposal is aimed at enhancing research in areas such as those described above. Further examples include: (a) studies of defect conduction paths with applications to fuel cells, (b) understanding the molecular behavior of model compounds such as polyradicals, and elucidating biomolecular dynamics and bond making and breaking reactions, (c) computations to understand the photophysics of light-producing and light-detecting proteins, (d) studies of the conformations of small peptides and other important areas.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 92.01K | Year: 2014

Soil degradation is a major global environmental problem. Agroecological methods such as no-till farming and intensive grazing have potential to restore soil fertility, reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture, and restore soil function as a sink for carbon. Degraded pasture land, one of the most prevalent land covers on Earth and common in the South Carolina Piedmont, presents significant potential for increased agricultural productivity and carbon sequestration. This Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) award funds analytical equipment that will be used to collect soil carbon data which will increase understanding of current and future soil quality, and its relationship to land uses such as pasture and urban lawns, in the South Carolina Piedmont. Better understanding of the properties of Piedmont soils may lead to improved soil management, which in turn can influence watershed hydrology and water quality in the region. A major objective of instrumentation acquisition is to train undergraduates to use research grade instruments and to interpret the data, preparing them for both employment and graduate education. Students using this instrument will conduct research in soil biogeochemistry, and results will directly benefit local farmers working to mitigate soil degradation. Students will benefit from interaction with farmers, gaining understanding of the importance of agroecosystems to society. In addition to involving undergraduate students (who are predominantly female) from Furman University, the researchers will involve high school students through research and education programs already in place. Also, Furmans membership in two consortia of southeastern liberal arts colleges provides the opportunity to involve undergraduates from several Historically Black Colleges. This project is jointly funded by the MRI program and the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR).
Specifically, this award funds the acquisition of a LECO TruMac Series CN Macro Determinator to analyze the carbon and nitrogen content of soils and sediments. This instrument will expand the research activities associated with the River Basins Research Initiative at Furman University to include studies of terrestrial, as well as aquatic, biogeochemistry. Initially, the instrument will be used to analyze soil samples from soil cores collected from farms in the South Carolina Piedmont. The primary objective of this research is to understand how intensive grazing and no-till planting improve soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil organic nitrogen (SON). One of the farms began intensive grazing in 2012, and changes in SOC and SON at different depths will be tracked over the next 10 years or more. A secondary objective is to quantify the potential for pasture soils to serve as carbon sinks.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS IN CHEM | Award Amount: 337.91K | Year: 2015

At this REU Sites called A Research Incubator REU Site in Chemistry at Furman University funded by the Chemistry Division at the National Science Foundation, Professors Karen L. Buchmueller and colleagues at Furman University will provide research opportunities for ten students for ten weeks. The Site will involve three visiting teams, each consisting of a faculty mentor and two students who will come to Furman each summer to conduct research. Four Furman teams, each consisting of a faculty mentor and one student, will join them. Research topics may be developed independently by the visiting teams, or in collaboration with one of the Furman teams. Early in the summer, a customizable workshop schedule will provide safety and ethics training, career advising and hands-on experience with key analytical instrumentation. Social and outreach activities will complement focused laboratory research to encourage the intellectual development of young scientists. Additional mentor-focused development activities will help to advance long-term sustainable research programs at the partner institutions.

This REU Site will serve as a research incubator, resulting in beneficial impacts well beyond the host institutions summer program and the participation of the immediate undergraduate. This will be accomplished by hosting faculty/student teams from partner institutions or schools where internal research activities are limited or non-existent. Potential partners will include 2-year institutions and institutions with diverse student populations. The approach will encourage continued faculty/student research activity after the formal summer program, while simultaneously providing an outstanding experience for those students directly involved in the program.

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