Shelton, WA, United States
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— Global Chaga Mushroom Extract Industry Report offers market overview, segmentation by types, application, countries, key manufactures, cost analysis, industrial chain, sourcing strategy, downstream buyers, marketing strategy analysis, distributors/traders, factors affecting market, forecast and other important information for key insight. Companies profiled in this report are Baikal Herbs, Limonnik, World Of Chaga, Lgberry, Nutra Green, Sayan Health, Fungi Perfecti, Annanda Chaga, Fungi Health, Eco-Siberia, Chaga Mountain in terms of Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017). Split by Product Types, with sales, revenue, price, market share of each type, can be divided into • Water extract • Dual extract Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Chaga Mushroom Extract in each application, can be divided into • Others Purchase a copy of this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/501902 Table of Content: 1 Chaga Mushroom Extract Market Overview 2 Global Chaga Mushroom Extract Sales, Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Manufacturers 3 Global Chaga Mushroom Extract Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 4 Global Chaga Mushroom Extract Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 5 North America Chaga Mushroom Extract Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 6 Latin America Chaga Mushroom Extract Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 7 Europe Chaga Mushroom Extract Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 8 Asia-Pacific Chaga Mushroom Extract Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 9 Middle East and Africa Chaga Mushroom Extract Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 10 Chaga Mushroom Extract Manufacturing Cost Analysis 11 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers 12 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders 13 Market Effect Factors Analysis 14 Global Chaga Mushroom Extract Market Forecast (2017-2022) 15 Research Findings and Conclusion 16 Appendix Inquire more for more details about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/501902 For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/2017-2022-global-top-countries-chaga-mushroom-extract-market-report


Abrams D.I.,University of California at San Francisco | Couey P.,University of California at San Francisco | Shade S.B.,University of California at San Francisco | Kelly M.E.,University of California at San Francisco | And 2 more authors.
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2011

Background: Antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens in HIV patients commonly cause significant lipid elevations, including increases in both triglycerides and cholesterol. Standard treatments for hypercholesterolemia include the HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, or "statins." Because many ART agents and statins share a common metabolic pathway that uses the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, coadministration of ART with statins could increase statin plasma levels significantly. The oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, has been shown in animal models to decrease lipid levels - a finding that has been supported by preliminary data in a small human trial.Methods: To assess the safety and efficacy of P. ostreatus in patients with HIV and ART-induced hyperlipidemia, a single-arm, open-label, proof-of-concept study of 8 weeks' duration with a target enrollment of 20 subjects was conducted. Study patients with ART-induced elevated non-HDL cholesterol levels (> 160 mg/dL) were enrolled. Participants received packets of freeze-dried P. ostreatus (15 gm/day) to be administered orally for the 8 week trial period. Lipid levels were drawn every two weeks to assess efficacy. Safety assessments included self-reported incidence of muscle aches and measurement of liver and muscle enzymes. Mean within-person change in lipid levels were estimated using generalized estimating equations to account for repeated observations on individuals. A 30 mg/dL decrease in non-HDL cholesterol was deemed clinically significant.Results: 126 patients were screened to enroll 25, of which 20 completed the 8-week study. The mean age was 46.4 years (36-60). Patients had a mean 13.7 yrs of HIV infection. Mean non-HDL cholesterol was 204.5 mg/dL at day 0 and 200.2 mg/dL at day 56 (mean within-person change = -1.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -17.4, 14.0). HDL cholesterol levels increased from 37.8 mg/dL at day 0 to 40.4 mg/dL on day 56 (mean within-person change = 2.6; 95% CI = -0.1, 5.2). Triglycerides dropped from 336.4 mg/dL on day 0 to 273.4 mg/dL on day 56 (mean within-person change = -63.0; 95% CI = -120.9, -5.1). Only 3 individuals achieved a sustained clinically significant (30 mg/dL) decline in non-HDL cholesterol after 8 weeks of therapy. There were no adverse experiences reported other than patients' distaste for the preparation. Liver function tests and muscle enzymes were not affected by the 8 weeks of treatment.Conclusions: Pleurotus ostreatus as administered in this experiment did not lower non-HDL cholesterol in HIV patients with ART-induced hypercholesterolemia. Small changes in HDL and triglycerides were not of a clinical magnitude to warrant further study.Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00069524. © 2011 Abrams et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Taylor A.,Fungi Perfecti, LLC | Flatt A.,Washington State University | Beutel M.,Washington State University | Wolff M.,Fungi Perfecti, LLC | And 2 more authors.
Ecological Engineering | Year: 2015

Pathogens from nonpoint sources are the leading cause of water quality impairments in US surface waters. This study assessed the capacity of basidiomycetous fungal mycelium on cellulosic substrates to remove Escherichia coli from synthetic stormwater under unsaturated vertical-flow conditions. The mycelium of Stropharia rugoso-annulata was tested in mycofiltration columns consisting of 18.6. L containers with mycelium grown on either wood chips or a mixture of wood chips and straw. S. rugoso-annulata mycofiltration columns were loaded with water spiked with 600-900. cfu/100. mL of E. coli at low (0.5. L/min; 0.57. m/d) and high (2.2. L/min; 2.5. m/d) hydraulic loading. Influent and effluent were monitored for thermotolerant coliform and E. coli using the Coliscan membrane filter chromogenic method. Alder wood chips infused with S. rugoso-annulata mycelium yielded a removal rate of around 20% relative to control filters. Wood chip and straw media appeared less effective with substantial net export of bacteria from both mycelium-infused and un-inoculated control media. The un-inoculated control media used in this study commonly exported high concentrations of thermotolerant coliform bacteria. On wood chip-based media, the presence of actively growing mycelium reduced the thermotolerant coliform exports by >90% relative to the control media. The study highlights the limitations of using thermotolerant coliform to assess pathogen removal in cellulose rich ecotechnologies like mycofiltration. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Grant
Agency: Environmental Protection Agency | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 80.00K | Year: 2012

This Small Business innovation Research project will explore the development of mycofiltration– the use of fungal mycelium as a biologically active filter for removing pathogens from storm water. As pollution from pathogens is the leading cause of critically impaired waters nationwide, with storm water strongly linked to this contamination, this cutting edge research is a timely response to the Environmental Protection Agency’s focus on safe and sustainable water resources. Although there is substantial evidence that many fungi consume bacteria and secrete antibacterial metabolites, myconological research has remained largely isolated to ecological and pharmaceutical explorations.The proposed mycofiltration research will expand knowledge of the application of fungal biotechnology in an innovative and interdisciplinary way by tying together the fields of public health environmental engineering, and mycology. The research will seek to identify which fungal species and cultivation methods can filter pathogens from storm water while meeting the physical and temporal demands required for commercialization. The objective will be accomplished through a university-industry collaboration that will use E. coli removal as a model for pathogen filtration to evaluate the efficacy of mycofilters that meet industry –mandated permeability and resiliency requirements for storm water treatment. This research is anticipated to confirm that fungal mycelium can remove E. coli from flowing water, and that mycofilters can be developed to meet design requirements to treat municipal storm water runoff. The development of mycofiltration technology will have wide-ranging water treatment implications, strong commercial applications, and broad benefits to society. Successful laboratory proof-of-concept data (Phase I) will confirm the hypothesis that fungal mycelium can be used as a living water filter – an approach that has a wide range of water treatment implications, including treatment of a broad array of contaminants. Advanced development and field efficacy data (Phase II) will support the commercial development of mycofiltration as a low-cost, low-impact, and low-footprint technology for removing pathogens from storm water. The potential value of this applied research effort is a storm water treatment system that enhances the ability of municipalities to improve storm water quality while supporting an innovative small business. This technology will broadly benefit society by providing cleaner water for recreation and commercial fishing. Additionally, the research will be disseminated broadly through the PI’s established work-wide speaking engagements, thereby generation interest, engagement, and understanding of the place of mycology and innovation in solving the complex problem of non-point water pollution.


Fungi Perfecti, LLC | Entity website


Fungi Perfecti, LLC | Entity website


Fungi Perfecti, LLC | Entity website


Fungi Perfecti, LLC | Entity website


Fungi Perfecti, LLC | Entity website

Host Defense MycoBotanicals MycoBotanicals are the new Host Defense formulas featuring carefully-selected herbs to complement specific mushrooms for a powerful impact on targeted body systems. Only organically-grown herbs accompany Host Defense Organic Mushrooms, delivering the perfect blend from both kingdoms in one convenient formula ...


Fungi Perfecti, LLC | Entity website

By Paul Stamets Trametes versicolor, commonly known as the Turkey Tail Mushroom Few people know that we are more closely related to fungi than to any other kingdom. 650 million years ago, we split from fungi ...

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