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Surcel C.,Fundeni Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation
Journal of medicine and life | Year: 2011

Stress urinary incontinence is still a "battlefield" for many minimally invasive therapies, but, unfortunately, few can restore the anatomical and functional background of this disorder. Assessing the latest minimally invasive procedures of intra and perisphincterian injection of autologous stem cells. The first stem cell implantation (myoblasts and /or mature fibroblasts grown and multiplied in the laboratory from biopsy samples taken from the pectoralis muscle) in the urethral sphincter was performed on October 18, 2010, in "Fundeni" Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation, in Romania. The follow-up at six weeks with the quality of life questionnaires, micturition diary and clinical examination revealed a decrease of urine loss from six pads/ day at one per day, which significantly improved the patient's quality of life according to visual analogue scale. Clinical and urodynamic evaluations will continue and will be future scientific topics. Source


Surcel C.,Fundeni Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation
Journal of medicine and life | Year: 2011

Treatment of stress urinary incontinence consists of a wide range of options, from conservative therapies like lifestyle changes, medication, pelvic floor muscles exercises, electro-stimulation, to minimally invasive procedures--injection of collagen, suburethral slings TVT/TOT and last but not least, invasive surgical treatment reserved for recurrent and complex cases. Among the latest minimally invasive procedures reported in literature, the injection of intra-and perisphincterian of autologous stem cell (mioblasts and/or mature fibroblasts grown and multiplied in the laboratory from biopsy samples taken from the pectoralis muscles). On October 18, 2010, in 'Fundeni' Clinical Institute of Uronephrology and Renal Transplantation was performed the first stem cell implantation procedure in the urethral sphincter, in Romania. Assessment at 6 weeks, the quality of life questionnaires, micturition diary and clinical examination revealed a stunning decrease of urine loss from 6 pads/day at one per day, which significantly improved the patient's quality of life. Stem-cell-mioblasts therapy may represent in the future an every-day intervention in the urologist's armamentarium. The effectiveness of this treatment can change the course of therapy and last but not least, the accessibility to urological evaluation of patients with stress urinary incontinence. Clinical and urodynamic evaluations will continue and will be future scientific topics. Source


Huri E.,Ankara Nuclear Research And Training Center | Surcel C.,Fundeni Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation | Larre S.,University of Reims | Miano R.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | Sorget J.,Denver Health Medical Center
Canadian Journal of Urology | Year: 2013

Despite the growth of the digital era, rapid spread of information, and real-time communication, there are several urologists throughout the world who do not have access to urological scientific programs, academic training programs, or memberships to well-established urological organizations, associations, and societies. The International Young Urological Association (IYUA) is a non-profit organization that was created to specifically address and facilitate access for urologists that for geopolitical, economical, or other reasons would not otherwise have these opportunities available to them. The IYUA's non-competitive nature allows for urologists to use the IYUA as an initial platform to network with globally established organizations to deliver scientific training programs, courses, and meetings in less common locations. It is our objective to demonstrate the IYUA's mission and facets that may contribute to the increased academic and scientific education of professionals in Urology where the access to these resources can be challenging. © The Canadian Journal of Urology. Source


Surcel C.,Fundeni Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation | Savu C.,Fundeni Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation | Chibelean C.,Fundeni Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation | Iordache A.,Fundeni Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation | And 2 more authors.
Romanian Journal of Morphology and Embryology | Year: 2012

Rationale: Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) represents a major public health problem and although there are many treatments available, only a few can restore the anatomical background of this disorder. Injections of stem cells into the middle urethra have the possibility of restoring the contractility of the striated muscles and rhabdosphincters. The aim of stem cell therapy is to replace, repair or enhance the biological function of damaged tissue or organs. Objective: Assessing the latest minimally invasive procedures of intra and perisphincterian injection of autologous stem cells and to compare the urodynamic results at one year after different surgical procedures for genuine stress urinary incontinence by measuring their impact on urinary flow rate (Qmax) and bladder pressure at Qmax during micturition. Methods and Results: On October 18, 2010, in "Fundeni" Clinic of Urology and Renal Transplantation we performed for the first time in Romania, stem cell implantation in the urethral sphincter in four patients with stress urinary incontinence and compared the results of the urodynamic investigations of female patients operated with pure SUI with other surgical techniques. The analyzed procedures were: Burch colposuspension (11 cases), TVT-like (IVS sling in 26 cases), TOT-like (CYSTO-SWING sling in 41 cases). Followed variables were: Qmax, Pves at Qmax, postvoiding residual (PVR). Clinical examination and voiding diary in six weeks after the surgery revealed a decrease of urine loss with an improvement of the patient's quality of life according to visual analogue scale. For female patients with myoblasts implant, changes in Qmax and Pves at Qmax were minimal and statistically insignificant in the context of inclusion criteria, but we noticed a trend of minimal change in these urodynamic characteristics, namely, an average decrease of Qmax with 2.1 mL/s and an average increase of Pves at Qmax with 0.6 cmH2O. Conclusions: The development of myoblasts implant (if they will pass the time-proof test) could represent a breakthrough in treating this condition. As the pathogenesis of SUI is better understood and the development of tissue engineering technology advances, tissue engineering will play a more important role in the treatment of patients with SUI. Source

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