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Luna M.C.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | Martinez-Sanchez A.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | Selma M.V.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | Tudela J.A.,CSIC - Center of Edafology and Applied Biology of the Segura | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture | Year: 2013

BACKGROUND: Little information is available about the impact of nutrient solution ion concentration on quality characteristics and shelf life of fresh-cut lettuce grown in soilless systems in open field. Three lettuce genotypes, lollo rosso and red oak leaf as red-leafed genotypes and butterhead as green-leafed genotype, were studied. The influence of three nutrient solutions with low, medium and high ion concentrations, which varied in the macroanion (NO-3) and macrocations (K+, Ca2+ and NH+4), were compared in summer and winter. RESULTS: The nutrient solutions evaluated in this study for the production of lettuce in a soilless system did not strongly influence the quality characteristics of the raw material. When the ion concentration of the nutrient solution was increased, fresh weight decreased, although it depended on the genotype and season. Maturity index and dry matter content varied with the season but independently of the nutrient solution. In summer, maturity index was higher and dry matter lower than in winter. Initial texture and visual quality were not influenced by the nutrient solution. Medium ion concentration provided the highest content of vitamin C and phenolic compounds. Our observations pointed out that the genotype had a strong influence on the shelf life of the fresh-cut product with minor differences among nutrient solutions. In general, red-leafed lettuces showed the highest antioxidant content, helping the maintenance of sensory characteristics throughout storage. CONCLUSION: The combination of optimal nutrient solution ion concentration and suitable cultivar is considered essential to ensure lettuce post-cutting life. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.


Baixauli C.,Fundacion Ruralcaja Valencia | Giner A.,Fundacion Ruralcaja Valencia | Aguilar J.M.,Fundacion Ruralcaja Valencia | Najera I.,Fundacion Ruralcaja Valencia | And 5 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2012

The usual artichoke productive cycle in The Spanish Mediterranean Coast with common clone varieties happens from October to May, but the most interesting period is from middle October to first March. Plants of three seed propagated cultivars ('Imperial Star', 'Harmony' and 'Madrigal'), which were planted on 1st August 2005; were sprayed three times between 20th September and 20th October 2005 with gibberellic acid (GA3), at doses of 30, 60 and 90 mg L-1 (D1, D2 and D3 respectively); so that it was applied a total of 375 L.ha-1. Three replicates of 10 plants per cultivar were arranged in a completely randomized design. The highest early yields (until the end of January 2006) were obtained with all GA3 doses compared to the control, and with 'Imperial Star' and 'Harmony' against 'Madrigal'. GA3 doses did not affect early production of 'Imperial Star'. Nevertheless in 'Harmony' and mainly in 'Madrigal', the higher doses caused earlier productions, having been found significant interactions (GA3 doses x cultivar). The total commercial yield (until the end of May 2006) was higher on control plants and D1 and D2 treated plants, than on D3 plants. The total commercial yield was also higher in 'Madrigal' than in 'Harmony' and 'Imperial Star'. Besides, in 'Imperial Star' and 'Harmony' the total commercial yields decreased as GA3 doses were increased. Head weight in the early and total commercial production was similar among cultivars and was not affected by the GA3 dose. On the other hand the incidence of open bracts in the early production was higher on D2 and D3 treated plants, and this incidence was higher in 'Imperial Star' than in 'Harmony' and 'Madrigal' along all the experiment with statistically differences. © ISHS.


Baixauli C.,Fundacion Ruralcaja Valencia | Giner A.,Fundacion Ruralcaja Valencia | Najera I.,Fundacion Ruralcaja Valencia | Miguel A.,IVIA | And 4 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2012

The most interesting artichoke production period in the Spanish Mediterranean Coast is autumn-winter. Seeds of seven cultivars ('Imperial Star', 'Alberca', 'Harmony', 'Concerto', 'Madrigal', 'Opal' and 'Lorca') and five lines ('DS-1000', 'DS-2000', 'AR-1', 'AR-2' and 'AR-3') were sown in polystyrene trays on the 14th June 2005 and planted on the 1st August in south Valencia, Spain. 'Blanca de Tudela' and 'Violeta de Provenza', which are asexually propagated cultivars, were planted in the same date and used as controls. Three replicates of 10 plants per cultivar/line were arranged in a completely randomized design. All cultivars and lines were sprayed three times between 20th September and 20th October 2005 with gibberellic acid at 30 mg L-1. Harvest started in October for 'Blanca de Tudela' and among seed propagated cultivars/lines, 'Imperial Star' and 'Lorca' (beginning harvest in November) were the earliest, while 'Concerto' and 'Madrigal' (beginning harvest in February) were the latest. At the end of February 2006, 'Imperial Star' (0.72 kg m-2 of market yield), 'Blanca de Tudela', 'Lorca' and 'DS-1000' (0.66 kg m-2 for all three), were the most productive varieties. The highest total market yields (until the end of May 2006) were obtained in 'Madrigal' (2.28 kg m-2), 'Concerto' (1.86 kg m-2), 'AR-3' (1.77 kg m-2) and 'DS-1000' (1.69 kg m-2). Whereas the highest non-marketable yields were reached by 'AR-2' (1.05 kg m-2), 'AR-3' (0.84 kg m-2) and 'DS-2000' (0.78 kg m-2). Furthermore at the end of the experiment (end of May), there were not differences among cultivars/lines, for the variable head size (between 91 and 157 g), however some statistically differences during some controls made over the productive cycle were detected for this parameter. © ISHS.

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