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Russell A.,Louisiana State University | Johnson S.,Louisiana State University | Cibils X.,Instituto Nacional Of Investigacion Agropecuaria | McKay F.,Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas | And 4 more authors.
Biological Control | Year: 2017

Cyrtobagous salviniae is widely used in several countries including the United States, South Africa and Australia for biological control of Salvinia molesta Mitchell (Salviniales: Salviniaceae). Despite considerable success in tropical and subtropical regions, the effectiveness of C. salviniae on S. molesta is inconsistent in temperate regions, indicating the need for populations adapted to cooler climates. The objectives of this study were to determine the regions of South America that are climatically similar to S. molesta habitats in temperate Louisiana, conduct surveys for new provenances of C. salviniae in these regions, establish the phylogenetic relationships among C. salviniae provenances, and compare the cold tolerance of populations of C. salviniae from Louisiana, USA and the Lower Paraná-Uruguay Delta (LPUD), South America. Foreign exploration of the Lower Paraná-Uruguay Delta region resulted in the first record of C. salviniae in Uruguay, and revealed the most southern distribution of this species in Argentina and Uruguay. Phylogenetic identification of this provenance indicated that it is a different biotype to the one from Brazil which was first released in the United States in 2001. Analysis of the climate in south, central, and north Louisiana revealed colder and more frequent cold fronts in the north, likely contributing to winter population crashes. Regional differences in Louisiana thermal regimes indicate that there is a need for region specific management plans, such as the inclusion of cold tolerant C. salviniae populations in the management of S. molesta in temperate regions. The cold tolerance of C. salviniae populations from Louisiana and Lower Paraná-Uruguay Delta were compared by measuring survival at 0 °C, chill coma recovery times, and supercooling points (SCP). Survival at 0 °C was 1.5-times greater, mean chill coma recovery time was 1.8-times faster, and mean SCP was 1.2-times lower in the Lower Paraná-Uruguay Delta population compared to the Louisiana population. These findings show that the Lower Paraná-Uruguay Delta provenance should be considered for managing S. molesta in temperate regions. Besides host range tests on the Lower Paraná-Uruguay Delta biotype, cross breeding between the Louisiana and Lower Paraná-Uruguay Delta populations of C. salviniae should be investigated to determine the life histories of any possible hybrids. © 2017 Elsevier Inc.


McConnachie A.J.,ARC Plant Protection Research Institute | McConnachie A.J.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | McKay F.,Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas
Biocontrol Science and Technology | Year: 2016

Campuloclinium macrocephalum (Less.) DC. (Asteraceae) (pompom weed), an invader in South Africa and Swaziland, threatens biodiversity conservation, agriculture and tourism in the region. We report on the host range and impact of the flower-feeding moth, Cochylis campuloclinium Brown (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), the second insect biological control agent to be considered for C. macrocephalum in South Africa. Laboratory host-specificity tests were conducted on 31 Asteraceae species. Field host range studies included 17 non-target Asteraceae species. Results of both C. campuloclinium laboratory and field host-range trials indicated that it is suitably host specific. In laboratory host-range trials, only C. macrocephalum and the closely related native, Adenostemma caffrum DC. (Asteraceae), received feeding damage, while in field host-range trials, the moth was only recorded on the target. Laboratory impact studies showed that C. campuloclinium destroyed a significant number of florets in flower buds (76%) and seeds in mature flowers (54%). Based on evidence from the native range, there appears to be no competitive interactions between C. campuloclinium and the already established stem- and leaf-deforming thrips, Liothrips tractabilis Mound & Pereyra (Thysanoptera: Phlaethripinae). The two insect agents should perform a complementary role of reducing flowering (L. tractabilis) and seed production (C. campuloclinium). Based on the above data, permission for the release of the moth was sought in August 2015. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.


PubMed | SNSB Bavarian State Collection of Zoology Zoologische Staatssammlung, Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas and CSIRO
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2016

A new species is described from Argentina: Eueupithecia vollonoides sp. n. and a differential diagnosis from E. cisplatensis Prout, 1910 is given. The genus Eueupithecia Prout, 1910 (Sterrhinae), so far having been retained to be monotypic, includes two species now.


McConnachie A.,Agricultural Research Council Plant Protection Research Institute | McConnachie A.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | McKay F.,Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas
BioControl | Year: 2015

We report on the host range and impact of Liothrips tractabilis Mound and Pereyra (Thysanoptera: Phlaeothripinae), the first biological control agent to be considered for Campuloclinium macrocephalum (Less.) DC. (Asteraceae) (pompom weed) in South Africa. Laboratory host-range tests were conducted on 45 Asteraceae species. Field host range studies included 16 Asteraceae species. Results of both laboratory tests and field host range data indicated that L. tractabilis is suitably host specific to C. macrocephalum and hence safe for release in South Africa. Laboratory impact studies on both seedlings and regrowth showed that, even under low inoculation densities, L. tractabilis had a significant impact on plant height, number of leaves, flower production and biomass. Based on the above data, permission for the release of the thrips was applied for, and in June 2013, granted by South African authorities. First releases of L. tractabilis were made in the summer of 2013/2014, and in November 2014 its establishment was confirmed. © 2015, International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC).


Weber D.C.,Biocontrol | Leskey T.C.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Walsh G.C.,Fundacion Para El Estudio de Especies Invasivas | Khrimian A.,Biocontrol
Journal of Economic Entomology | Year: 2014

The reported male-produced aggregation pheromone of the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), identified as a mixture of (3S,6S,7R,10S)- 10,11-epoxy-1-bisabolen-3-ol and (3R,6S,7R,10S)-10,11-epoxy-1-bisabolen-3-ol, offers new opportunities for its management.Wefound that black pyramid traps deployed along crop borders in Maryland and West Virginia, containing lures with both stereoisomers of this reported aggregation pheromone combined with methyl (E,E,Z)-2,4,6-decatrienoate (MDT) lures, attracted more adult and nymphal H. halys than either the aggregation pheromone or MDT alone. In season-long totals, combined lures acted synergistically by catching 1.9-3.2 times more number of adults, and 1.4-2.5 times more number of nymphs, than expected from an additive effect of the lures deployed individually. There were no significant differences in patterns of male and female captures. MDT alone was not significantly attractive to adults during most of the growing season, but became increasingly attractive to adults and especially nymphs in autumn. Mixed-isomer lures containing eight stereoisomers of 10,11-epoxy- 1-bisabolen-3-ol, including the two active stereoisomers, were as effective at catching adults and nymphs with or without MDT as were lures loaded only with the two active stereoisomers in the natural ratio ((3S,6S,7R,10S)-10,11-epoxy-1-bisabolen-3-ol: (3R,6S,7R,10S)-10,11-epoxy- 1-bisabolen- 3-ol) of 3.5:1. These results identify a combination of semiochemicals that is attractive season-long for detection, monitoring, and potential control of this polyphagous invasive pest of North America and Europe. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.


Porter S.D.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Kumar V.,University of Florida | Calcaterra L.A.,Fundacion Para El Estudio de Especies Invasivas | Briano J.A.,Fundacion Para El Estudio de Especies Invasivas | Seal D.R.,University of Florida
Florida Entomologist | Year: 2013

The little decapitating fly Pseudacteon cultellatus Borgmeier (Diptera: Phoridae) from Argentina was released as a self-sustaining biological control agent against the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Florida to parasitize small fire ant workers associated with multiple-queen colonies. This fly appears to be established at 2 of 5 release sites, but populations still remain very low (≤ 1% of total Pseudacteon flies) and localized more than 2 yr after their release. Further releases of P. cultellatus in the United States should be limited to a few additional sites in different habitats or climatic regions where this fly might be more successful.


Coulin C.,Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas | Calcaterra L.A.,Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas | Follett P.A.,U.S. Department of Agriculture
Journal of Applied Entomology | Year: 2014

Irradiation is a post-harvest quarantine treatment option to control ants and other hitchhiker pests on fresh horticultural products traded between countries. As little is known about irradiation effects on ants, radiotolerance of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Dolichoderinae), was studied to determine a dose sufficient for its control. Queens collected from Buenos Aires, Argentina, were irradiated with 30, 60, 90 Gy or left untreated as controls, and then followed for 8 weeks to evaluate their survival and fecundity. Overall queen survival and brood viability decreased with increasing irradiation dose. The number of eggs was reduced by 50%, 69% and 56% in the 30, 60 and 90 Gy doses, respectively, compared with untreated control queens. The percentage of eggs that developed into larvae decreased from 41.1% in the control to 22.5%, 1.4%, and 0% in the 30, 60, and 90 Gy treatments, respectively. Thus, the number of larvae was reduced by 69% in the 30 Gy treatment compared with the control, only one larva was observed in the 60 Gy treatment, and none in the 90 Gy treatment. Only one pupa was observed in the 30 Gy treatment and none in the 60 and 90 Gy treatments during the 8-week experiment. Queens irradiated with 60 and 90 Gy had significantly reduced longevity compared with queens treated with lower doses or untreated queens. Radiation dose ≥90 Gy stopped brood development in Argentine ant queens and should be sufficient as a phytosanitary treatment. The radiotolerance of Argentine ant appears to be similar to that of two other important invasive ants. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.


Wheeler G.S.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Mc Kay F.,Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas | Vitorino M.D.,Regional University of Blumenau | Williams D.A.,Texas Christian University
BioControl | Year: 2013

Surveys for biological control agents of the invasive weed Schinus terebinthifolius (Anacardiaceae) discovered two Omolabus weevils (Coleoptera: Attelabidae) feeding on the plant in its native range. Molecular and morphological analysis indicated that one of these species consistently fed on the target weed and the other species fed more broadly. Aspects of the biology and host range of the more specific species, Omolabus piceus (Germar) were examined to determine its suitability as a biological control agent of S. terebinthifolius in the USA. Adults feed on newly formed leaves, and eggs, larvae and pupae develop in curled fragments of leaves, called nidi. Larvae consumed an average of 11.3 (±0.4) mg throughout their development which required 15.1 (±0.2) days. An average of 31.6 (±2.7) eggs were laid per female during their 23.8 (±2.2) day lifetime, after a 3.4 (±1.0) day preoviposition period. In no-choice tests, O. piceus adults fed and oviposited on all tested native North American, Caribbean and agricultural Anacardiaceae species except for M. indica. The field host-range of O. piceus, as determined by samples of host use in the native range, included three Schinus, two Lithrea and one Anacardium species. Therefore, we do not recommend O. piceus for biological control of S. terebinthifolius in the USA. However, the utilization of this species in other infested areas such as Hawaií and Australia should be considered. © 2013 International Organization for Biological Control (outside the USA).


Hernandez M.C.,Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas | Cabrera Walsh G.,Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas
Journal of insect science (Online) | Year: 2014

The South American water primroses, Ludwigia grandiflora (Michx.) Greuter & Burdet, L. grandiflora subsp. hexapetala (Hook. & Arn.) G.L. Nesom & Kartesz, Ludwigia peploides (Kunth) P.H. Raven, and L. p. subsp. montevidensis (Spreng.) P.H. Raven (Onagraceae, Section Oligospermum), have become invasive in several watersheds of the United States and Europe. Surveys were carried out in center-east of Argentina to find insect species that might serve as biological control agents for L. g. subsp. hexapetala in California and elsewhere. Stems (0.5-0.6 m) of Ludwigia species, Sect. Oligospermum, were collected in 41 sites and analyzed in the laboratory; immature insects were reared to adults. The plant species found in the area were L. grandiflora (2 sites), L. g. subsp. hexapetala (33 sites), and L. p. subsp. montevidensis (4 sites). There was a variety of insect guilds feeding on L. g. subsp. hexapetala, including six species with stem-borer larvae, one species with fruit-feeding larvae, four species with defoliating larvae, two species with defoliating larvae on young leaves and axil meristems, one species of cell content feeder, and three species of sap feeders. Nine of these species also have defoliating adults. Biological information on most of them is provided. Of these insect herbivores, only two species were also found on L. grandiflora, and one on L. peploides. Several of the species found on L. g. hexapetala, such as the cell-content feeder Liothrips ludwigi (Thysanoptera), the stem-borers Merocnemus binotatus (Boheman) and Tyloderma spp. (Coleoptera), are promising candidates for biocontrol agents. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.


PubMed | Fundacion para el Estudio de Especies Invasivas
Type: | Journal: Journal of insect science (Online) | Year: 2014

The South American water primroses, Ludwigia grandiflora (Michx.) Greuter & Burdet, L. grandiflora subsp. hexapetala (Hook. & Arn.) G.L. Nesom & Kartesz, Ludwigia peploides (Kunth) P.H. Raven, and L. p. subsp. montevidensis (Spreng.) P.H. Raven (Onagraceae, Section Oligospermum), have become invasive in several watersheds of the United States and Europe. Surveys were carried out in center-east of Argentina to find insect species that might serve as biological control agents for L. g. subsp. hexapetala in California and elsewhere. Stems (0.5-0.6m) of Ludwigia species, Sect. Oligospermum, were collected in 41 sites and analyzed in the laboratory; immature insects were reared to adults. The plant species found in the area were L. grandiflora (2 sites), L. g. subsp. hexapetala (33 sites), and L. p. subsp. montevidensis (4 sites). There was a variety of insect guilds feeding on L. g. subsp. hexapetala, including six species with stem-borer larvae, one species with fruit-feeding larvae, four species with defoliating larvae, two species with defoliating larvae on young leaves and axil meristems, one species of cell content feeder, and three species of sap feeders. Nine of these species also have defoliating adults. Biological information on most of them is provided. Of these insect herbivores, only two species were also found on L. grandiflora, and one on L. peploides. Several of the species found on L. g. hexapetala, such as the cell-content feeder Liothrips ludwigi (Thysanoptera), the stem-borers Merocnemus binotatus (Boheman) and Tyloderma spp. (Coleoptera), are promising candidates for biocontrol agents.

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