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Alcala L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Espilez E.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Mampel L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Kirkland J.I.,Utah Geological Survey | And 8 more authors.
Geoheritage | Year: 2012

Systematic prospecting in the Oliete Geological Sub-basin (Aragonese Branch of the Iberian Range), specifically at an open-pit mine in the Escucha Formation (Lower Cretaceous) in Ariño (Teruel, Spain), has revealed a fossiliferous layer with abundant vertebrate and other early Albian fossils. The fossiliferous stratigraphic level coincides with the floor of the mining operations, i. e. the bonebed is just below the lowest layer of coal mined for industrial purposes. Coal mining in this area of Teruel province has occurred for over a century and intense mining activity is at the present time a major economic force in the region. The new discoveries at this Mesozoic vertebrate locality presented in this paper document the most important Albian dinosaur site identified in Europe. This important discovery is a direct result of mining activity, without which these important data would have remained buried hundreds of metres underground. These discoveries below the coal seams at Ariño fill out the Lower Cretaceous terrestrial record of Europe and expand upon the palaeogeographic context by which Europe may be compared against correlative dinosaur faunas in North America, Asia and North Africa. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Upchurch P.,University College London | Mannion P.D.,Imperial College London | Mas R.,Complutense University of Madrid | And 4 more authors.
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society | Year: 2014

The first dinosaur to be named from Spain, the sauropod Aragosaurus ischiaticusSanz, Buscalioni, Casanovas and Santafé 1987, is known from associated postcranial remains of one individual from the Las Zabacheras site in Galve, Teruel Province, Spain. Results of recent fieldwork confirm that the Las Zabacheras site represents a deltaic sediment complex in the Villar del Arzobispo Formation with a Tithonian-Berriasian (latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous) age. Description of the anatomy of Aragosaurus (including several previously undescribed elements) enables a re-evaluation of this taxon's relationships. Aragosaurus ischiaticus has six autapomorphies in the axial and appendicular skeleton, including the presence of epipophysis-like protuberances on middle caudal postzygapophyses. Phylogenetic analyses, using three independent data sets, support the view that Aragosaurus is a basal macronarian sauropod, lying outside of Titanosauriformes. Aragosaurus possesses derived states that are shared with basal Titanosauriformes, indicating that some characters previously considered to represent titanosauriform synapomorphies have a slightly wider distribution. A tooth, previously described as Aragosaurus, cannot be referred to this taxon as it was recovered from a different locality, and there are no overlapping elements with the holotype; it is here regarded as representing an indeterminate titanosauriform. These results, combined with new data on the stratigraphic age of Aragosaurus, demonstrate that basal macronarian sauropods were present in Europe at the end of the Late Jurassic, alongside more derived titanosauriforms. Aragosaurus is one of four genera of sauropod recovered from the Villar del Arzobispo Formation in Spain, making the latter an important contributor to our understanding of Late Jurassic sauropod diversity alongside the well-known contemporaneous faunas of the African Tendaguru Formation and the North American Morrison Formation. © 2014 The Linnean Society of London.


Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Mocho P.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | And 6 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2016

The Upper Jurassic’s central and northern sectors of the Bombarral Sub-basin are relatively poor in sauropod material, highlighting the specimens (mainly teeth) found in the Guimarota mine (Leiria) and the Andrés (Pombal) fossil site. The study of published and the unpublished sauropod material allows for a revision of the present state of sauropod diversity of the Bombarral Sub-basin. These new specimens come from Pombal, Leiria, Batalha, Porto de Mós, Alcobaça and Caldas da Rainha, and include an almost complete posterior or middle dorsal neural spine and a partial caudal series. The systematic re-evaluation of the sauropod record of this sector indicates the presence of turiasaurs, diplodocines, titanosauriforms and an indeterminate eusauropod form. During the last part of the twentieth century, the discovery of fossil vertebrates has increased significantly in the sediments cropping out in the central and northern sectors of the Bombarral Sub-basin (Alcobaça and Bombarral Formations), improving our understanding of the Late Jurassic faunas of the Lusitanian Basin. © 2016 Taylor & Francis


Buscalioni A.D.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Alcala L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Espilez E.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Mampel L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia
Spanish Journal of Paleontology | Year: 2014

Although goniopholidids constitute the most abundant remains of the Lower Cretaceous record of the Iberian Peninsula crocodilians, few specimens have been found complete enough to provide precise taxonomic determinations. The palaeontological site of Mina Santa María in Ariño (Teruel, Early Albian Escucha Formation) has yielded several neosuchian monotaxic concentrations. The skulls discovered at the Ariño Mine show a character combination linking them to the latter European species. The Ariño skulls share apomorphies with Anteophthalmosuchus hooleyi, Goniopholis willetti (e.g., loss of the transverse frontal crest and of the prefrontal-lachrymal crest, supratemporal fossa larger than the orbit and supratemporal fenestra subequal, among other derived characters). The new taxa, Hulkepholis plotos gen. n., sp. n. and Anteophthalmosuchus escuchae sp. n., are herein erected, and they constitute the most recent record of theirc clade in Europe. These sympatric species lived in a coastal marsh system with barrier islands and lagoon. © Sociedad Española de Paleontología ISSN 2255-0550.


Tibert N.E.,University of Mary Washington | Colin J.-P.,University of Lisbon | Kirkland J.I.,Utah Geological Survey | Alcala L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Martin-Closas C.,University of Barcelona
Micropaleontology | Year: 2013

Three new species of ostracodes are reported from the dinosaur-bearing Escucha Formation at Arino in Eastern Spain (Iberian Range): Rosacythere denticulata sp. nov., Theriosynoecum escuchaensis sp. nov. and Theriosynoecum arinnoensis sp. nov. Associated charophyta include Clavator harrisii harrisii and Clavator harrisii zavialensis indicating a Lower Albian age, therefore extending the stratigraphic range of the genus Theriosynoecum into the Albian in southern Europe. The environment of deposition for the dinosaur bonebed is interpreted as permanent lacustrine given the association of limnic ostracodes and charophytes.


Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Malafaia E.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Iberian Geology | Year: 2016

The Museu Geológico collections house some of the first sauropods found in the Upper Jurassic sediments of the Lusitanian Basin, including the Lourinhasaurus alenquerensis and Lusotitan atalaiensis lectotypes, previously considered as new species of the genera Apatosaurus and Brachiosaurus, respectively. Several fragmentary specimens have historically been referred to those taxa, but for the most part of these systematic attributions are not supported herein, excluding a caudal vertebra from Maceira (MG 8804) considered as cf. Lusotitan atalaiensis. The material housed in the Museu Geológico comprises remains of non-neosauropod eusauropods (including turiasaurs) and neosauropods (indeterminate neosauropods, diplodocids, camarasaurids and basal titanosauriforms). Middle caudal vertebrae with lateral fossae, with ventral hollow bordered by pronounced ventrolateral crests and, which are quadrangular in cross-section, indicate for the presence of diplodocine diplodocids in the northern part of the Lusitanian Basin Central Sector during the Late Jurassic. A humerus collected from Praia dos Frades (MG 4976) is attributed to cf. Duriatitan humerocristatus suggesting the presence of shared sauropod forms between the Portugal and United Kingdom during the Late Jurassic. Duriatitan is an indeterminate member of Eusauropoda and the discovery of new material in both territories is necessary to confirm its systematic position. The studied material is in accordance with the previously recorded sauropod fauna in the Portuguese Late Jurassic, which includes non-neosauropod eusauropods (including turiasaurs), diplodocids and macronarians (including camarasaurids and basal titanosauriforms). © 2016, Universidad Complutense de Madrid. All rights reserved.


Villanueva-Amadoz U.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Sender L.M.,University of Zaragoza | Alcala L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Pons D.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | And 2 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2015

The AR-1 layer, corresponding to the Escucha Formation (Lower Cretaceous) in the Santa Maria Mine of Ariño, has supplied rich and well-preserved macrofloral and palynological assemblages showing interesting data about both taphonomic and environmental conditions. This single layer is located in the Oliete Sub-Basin from the Maestrazgo Basin in northeastern Spain, and it represents one of the most outstanding single layer fossil sites in the world. This site shows abundant and diverse fauna containing exquisitely preserved vertebrate and invertebrate fossils (dinosaur bones, turtles, crocodiles, fishes, molluscs and ostracods) and also plant remains of Albian age. The assemblage is especially significant for dinosaur phylogenetic analysis. The sedimentary environment corresponds to a freshwater swamp plain with sporadic marine inputs within a deltaic–estuarine system under subtropical–tropical climate. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.


Villanueva-Amadoz U.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Sender L.M.,University of Zaragoza | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Verdu F.J.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | And 3 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2015

A well-preserved macroflora and rich palynological assemblages corresponding to the Camarillas Formation (early-middle Barremian) in the San Cristóbal and Galve Mine sites from the Galve sub-basin in northeastern Spain are presented here. These remains represent the first fossil plant evidence from these deposits. Within plant macroremains, the cheirolepidiacean Pseudofrenelopsis aff. varians (Fontaine) Watson has been found. The palynological assemblage yielded well-preserved spores and pollen grains, mainly dominated by the genus Classopollis. Spores are also abundantly represented by schizaeacean spores (Cicatricosisporites and Plicatella). This spore assemblage supports an early-middle Barremian age for these localities. It is noteworthy that small basal angiosperm pollen grains of the genera Crassipollis and Retimonocolpites, together with other indeterminate grains, have been reported here. This flora constitutes the primary food producer for dinosaur at that time, and thus the information of the flora is important for the understanding of the ecological background for the dinosaur evolution during the Early Cretaceous. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.


Vajda V.,Swedish Museum of Natural History | Vajda V.,Lund University | Pesquero Fernandez M.D.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Pesquero Fernandez M.D.,CSIC - National Museum of Natural Sciences | And 3 more authors.
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology | Year: 2016

Coprolites from the Early Cretaceous vertebrate bone-bed at Ariño in Teruel, Spain, were analyzed geochemically and palynologically. They contain various inclusions, such as small bone fragments, abundant plant remains, pollen, and spores. We attribute the coprolites to carnivorous dinosaurs based partly on their morphology together with the presence of bone fragments, and a high content of calcium phosphate (hydroxylapatite) with calcite. Well-preserved pollen and spore assemblages were identified in all coprolite samples and a slightly poorer assemblage was obtained from the adjacent sediments, both indicating an Early Cretaceous (Albian) age. This shows that the coprolites are in situ and also confirms previous age determinations for the host strata. The depositional environment is interpreted as a continental wetland based on the palynoflora, which includes several hydrophilic taxa, together with sparse occurrences of fresh-water algae, such as Ovoidites, and the absence of marine palynomorphs.Although the coprolites of Ariño samples generally are dominated by pollen produced by Taxodiaceae (cypress) and Cheirolepidiaceae (a family of extinct conifers), the sediment samples have a slightly higher relative abundance of fern spores. The distribution of major organic components varies between the coprolite and sediment samples, which is manifest by the considerably higher charcoal percentage within the coprolites. The high quantities of charcoal might be explained by a ground-dwelling species, feeding on smaller vertebrates that complemented its diet with plant material from a paleoenvironment were wild fires were a part of the ecosystem. The state of preservation of the spores and pollen is also more detailed in the coprolites, suggesting that encasement in calcium phosphate may inhibit degradation of sporopollenin. © 2016 The Authors.


Verdu F.J.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Cobos A.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Alcala L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia
Cretaceous Research | Year: 2015

Although Iguanodon is one of the most abundant and well-known of Europe's dinosaur genera, fossils of young specimens are very rare. Indeed, the fossil record contains very few examples of the young of any non-hadrosaurid iguanodontian. Here we report the discovery of 13 Iguanodon perinates from the Lower Cretaceous of Galve (Teruel, Spain). The characteristics of an adult and juvenile found nearby show these perinates to belong to a new species: Iguanodon galvensis sp. nov. The histological and osteological features of these young animals indicate them to have been in their first year of life. The taphonomic features of their remains, plus the finding of clearly embryonic vertebrae alongside them, suggest the perinates of this species remained in the vicinity of their nests for some time, possibly congregating in nursery areas. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

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