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Mocho P.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | And 7 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2016

Turiasauria is a clade of eusauropods with a wide stratigraphic range that could extend from the Bathonian to the lower Aptian including Turiasaurus, Losillasaurus, Zby and putatively, Galveosaurus, Atlasaurus and isolated remains from Middle Jurassic-to-Lower Cretaceous. Some are characterised by the presence of heart-shaped teeth. Several tooth occurrences from the Portuguese Upper Jurassic with this type of morphology (SI: 1.1–1.8) are reported and discussed. If this morphology is regarded as synapomorphic of Turiasauria, the teeth will be tentatively related to this clade. From a sample of 43 teeth, three main morphotypes are described. Three hypotheses might explain the morphological variation: (1) the range of tooth morphologies indicates variation in the jaw, (2) the range of tooth morphologies indicates taxonomic variation or (3) a combination of both. The general wear pattern in morphotypes I and II starts with a distal facet, then the appearance of mesial/apical facet and finally a ‘V’-shaped facet. In morphotype III, the wear begins with a mesial facet. The variability observed for Portuguese Upper Jurassic specimens is congruent with the morphological variability along the tooth row shown by other sauropods with spatulate/spoon-shaped teeth and it is considered the most parsimonious hypothesis to explain it. © 2015 Taylor & Francis. Source


Tibert N.E.,University of Mary Washington | Colin J.-P.,University of Lisbon | Kirkland J.I.,Utah Geological Survey | Alcala L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Martin-Closas C.,University of Barcelona
Micropaleontology | Year: 2013

Three new species of ostracodes are reported from the dinosaur-bearing Escucha Formation at Arino in Eastern Spain (Iberian Range): Rosacythere denticulata sp. nov., Theriosynoecum escuchaensis sp. nov. and Theriosynoecum arinnoensis sp. nov. Associated charophyta include Clavator harrisii harrisii and Clavator harrisii zavialensis indicating a Lower Albian age, therefore extending the stratigraphic range of the genus Theriosynoecum into the Albian in southern Europe. The environment of deposition for the dinosaur bonebed is interpreted as permanent lacustrine given the association of limnic ostracodes and charophytes. Source


Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Upchurch P.,University College London | Mannion P.D.,Imperial College London | Mas R.,Complutense University of Madrid | And 4 more authors.
Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society | Year: 2014

The first dinosaur to be named from Spain, the sauropod Aragosaurus ischiaticusSanz, Buscalioni, Casanovas and Santafé 1987, is known from associated postcranial remains of one individual from the Las Zabacheras site in Galve, Teruel Province, Spain. Results of recent fieldwork confirm that the Las Zabacheras site represents a deltaic sediment complex in the Villar del Arzobispo Formation with a Tithonian-Berriasian (latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous) age. Description of the anatomy of Aragosaurus (including several previously undescribed elements) enables a re-evaluation of this taxon's relationships. Aragosaurus ischiaticus has six autapomorphies in the axial and appendicular skeleton, including the presence of epipophysis-like protuberances on middle caudal postzygapophyses. Phylogenetic analyses, using three independent data sets, support the view that Aragosaurus is a basal macronarian sauropod, lying outside of Titanosauriformes. Aragosaurus possesses derived states that are shared with basal Titanosauriformes, indicating that some characters previously considered to represent titanosauriform synapomorphies have a slightly wider distribution. A tooth, previously described as Aragosaurus, cannot be referred to this taxon as it was recovered from a different locality, and there are no overlapping elements with the holotype; it is here regarded as representing an indeterminate titanosauriform. These results, combined with new data on the stratigraphic age of Aragosaurus, demonstrate that basal macronarian sauropods were present in Europe at the end of the Late Jurassic, alongside more derived titanosauriforms. Aragosaurus is one of four genera of sauropod recovered from the Villar del Arzobispo Formation in Spain, making the latter an important contributor to our understanding of Late Jurassic sauropod diversity alongside the well-known contemporaneous faunas of the African Tendaguru Formation and the North American Morrison Formation. © 2014 The Linnean Society of London. Source


Mocho P.,Spanish University for Distance Education (UNED) | Mocho P.,Laboratorio Of Paleontologia E Paleoecologia | Mocho P.,Autonomous University of Madrid | Royo-Torres R.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | And 6 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2016

The Upper Jurassic’s central and northern sectors of the Bombarral Sub-basin are relatively poor in sauropod material, highlighting the specimens (mainly teeth) found in the Guimarota mine (Leiria) and the Andrés (Pombal) fossil site. The study of published and the unpublished sauropod material allows for a revision of the present state of sauropod diversity of the Bombarral Sub-basin. These new specimens come from Pombal, Leiria, Batalha, Porto de Mós, Alcobaça and Caldas da Rainha, and include an almost complete posterior or middle dorsal neural spine and a partial caudal series. The systematic re-evaluation of the sauropod record of this sector indicates the presence of turiasaurs, diplodocines, titanosauriforms and an indeterminate eusauropod form. During the last part of the twentieth century, the discovery of fossil vertebrates has increased significantly in the sediments cropping out in the central and northern sectors of the Bombarral Sub-basin (Alcobaça and Bombarral Formations), improving our understanding of the Late Jurassic faunas of the Lusitanian Basin. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Source


Villanueva-Amadoz U.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Sender L.M.,University of Zaragoza | Alcala L.,Fundacion Conjunto Paleontologico de Teruel Dinopolis Museo Aragones de Paleontologia | Pons D.,University Pierre and Marie Curie | And 2 more authors.
Historical Biology | Year: 2015

The AR-1 layer, corresponding to the Escucha Formation (Lower Cretaceous) in the Santa Maria Mine of Ariño, has supplied rich and well-preserved macrofloral and palynological assemblages showing interesting data about both taphonomic and environmental conditions. This single layer is located in the Oliete Sub-Basin from the Maestrazgo Basin in northeastern Spain, and it represents one of the most outstanding single layer fossil sites in the world. This site shows abundant and diverse fauna containing exquisitely preserved vertebrate and invertebrate fossils (dinosaur bones, turtles, crocodiles, fishes, molluscs and ostracods) and also plant remains of Albian age. The assemblage is especially significant for dinosaur phylogenetic analysis. The sedimentary environment corresponds to a freshwater swamp plain with sporadic marine inputs within a deltaic–estuarine system under subtropical–tropical climate. © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Source

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