Fukuoka, Japan
Fukuoka, Japan

Fukuoka University is a private university in Fukuoka, Japan. It is the largest general university in western Japan, with more than 20,000 students. It is sometimes mistaken for a national university. Its predecessor was Fukuoka Higher Commercial School. Wikipedia.


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News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Hydrogen is one of the most promising clean fuels for use in cars, houses and portable generators. When produced from water using renewable energy resources, it is also a sustainable fuel with no carbon footprint. However, water-splitting systems require a very efficient catalyst to speed up the chemical reaction that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen, while preventing the gases from recombining back into water. Now an international research team, including scientists at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has developed a new catalyst with a molybdenum coating that prevents this problematic back reaction and works well in realistic operating conditions. A key part of the development centered on understanding how the molybdenum coating worked using experiments at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a DOE Office of Science User Facility. The scientists reported their results April 13 in Angewandte Chemie. “When you split water into hydrogen and oxygen, the gaseous products of the reaction are easily recombined back to water and it’s crucial to avoid this,” said Angel Garcia-Esparza, lead author and currently a postdoctoral researcher from the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon. “We discovered that a molybdenum-coated catalyst is capable of selectively producing hydrogen from water while inhibiting the back reactions of water formation.” The experiments demonstrated that their molybdenum coating strategy has applications in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis devices, added Garcia-Esparza. These are devices that help drive forward a reaction using electricity or light. Garcia-Esparza helped develop the new catalyst as a graduate student at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia under the direction of Kazuhiro Takanabe, an associate professor of chemical science at KAUST. Takanabe’s research group explored the stability, performance and function of many different elements before selecting molybdenum as the coating for a standard platinum-based catalyst. “Finding a coating that worked well in the acid electrolyte used for water splitting was a major challenge for my collaborators, because many materials quickly degrade in the acidic conditions,” said co-author Dimosthenis Sokaras, a staff scientist at SLAC. Of the coatings they tested, “Molybdenum was the best-performing material in acidic media, where the conditions for hydrogen evolution are favorable and facile,” Garcia-Esparza explained. Another major challenge was finding a way to measure the properties of their molybdenum-coated catalyst, because these molybdenum compounds are not stable when exposed to air. “Taking the catalyst out of water perturbs the identity of the material,” said Garcia-Esparza. “Therefore, it was necessary to study the electrocatalyst under working conditions, which is difficult.” So Garcia-Esparza spent a summer performing electrochemistry experiments at SSRL to characterize the new catalyst under operational conditions. “The idea was to work together to see how the molybdenum-coated catalyst performed and determine its electronic structure when it was operating,” said Sokaras. “We wanted to understand why the back reaction doesn’t happen.” They tested a bare platinum catalyst, with and without a molybdenum coating, during water electrolysis at SSRL, using in operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy with a custom-made electrochemical cell. “At SSRL, we were essentially able to do electrochemistry while analyzing the sample with synchrotron radiation,” Garcia-Esparza said. “The experiments performed at SLAC were the final piece of the puzzle to determine the local structure and state of the electrocatalyst under the operational conditions of hydrogen production.” “Our findings support that the molybdenum layer acts as a membrane to block the oxygen and hydrogen gases from reaching near the platinum surface, which prevents water formation,” Sokaras said. In addition, the research team explored photocatalysis applications. They built a photocatalytic water-splitting system using either a standard catalyst of platinum on strontium titanium oxide (Pt/SrTiO ) or the same catalyst coated with molybdenum. Both systems were tested at KAUST with the lights on and off — that is, with and without an energy source driving the water-splitting reaction. When the light was on, the standard Pt/SrTiO  catalyst increased hydrogen production for only six hours because the system lost efficiency due to the back reaction. When the lights were then turned off, the amount of hydrogen decreased with time — verifying that significant amounts of the gases were recombining to form water. In contrast, the molybdenum-coated catalyst continuously split water to generate increasing amounts of hydrogen gas for 24 hours, producing about twice as much hydrogen gas as the standard catalyst in one day. In addition, the amount of hydrogen remained stable in the dark, confirming that the coating inhibited water formation These results are promising, but more work still needs to be done before the catalyst can be used in a practical device. Sokaras said, “I think we’re far from actually talking about a commercial device, but it is certainly a huge improvement to have this new catalyst material that prevents the back reaction. Now we need to find a way to make the coating more stable so it produces hydrogen for even longer.” The research team included scientists from SSRL, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Fukuoka University, University of Tokyo, and the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research in Shanghai, China. The work was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.


« U of Illinois researchers develop new capabilities for genome-wide engineering of yeast | Main | Porsche Digital, Inc. opens location in Silicon Valley » Water-splitting systems require a very efficient catalyst to speed up the chemical reaction that splits water into hydrogen and oxygen, while preventing the two gases from recombining back into water. Now an international research team has developed a new catalyst with a molybdenum (Mo) coating that prevents this problematic back reaction and works well in realistic operating conditions. The research team included scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Fukuoka University, University of Tokyo, and the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research in Shanghai, China. The work was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. A paper on the work is published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The researchers suggested that the molybdenum layer likely hinders oxygen gas permeation, impeding contact with the active platinum. Photocatalytic overall water splitting proceeded using MoO /Pt/SrTiO with inhibited water formation from H and O —the prevailing back reaction on the bare Pt/SrTiO photocatalyst. The Mo coating was stable in acidic media for multiple hours of overall water splitting by membrane-less electrolysis and photocatalysis. A key part of the development centered on understanding how the molybdenum coating worked using experiments at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a DOE Office of Science User Facility. The experiments demonstrated that their molybdenum coating strategy has applications in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis devices, added Angel Garcia-Esparza, lead author and currently a postdoctoral researcher from the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon. Garcia-Esparza helped develop the new catalyst as a graduate student at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia under the direction of Kazuhiro Takanabe, an associate professor of chemical science at KAUST. Takanabe’s research group explored the stability, performance and function of many different elements before selecting molybdenum as the coating for a standard platinum-based catalyst. Another major challenge was finding a way to measure the properties of their molybdenum-coated catalyst, because these molybdenum compounds are not stable when exposed to air. Taking the catalyst out of water perturbs the identity of the material, explained Garcia-Esparza. “Therefore, it was necessary to study the electrocatalyst under working conditions—which is difficult.” The researchers tested a bare platinum catalyst, with and without a molybdenum coating, during water electrolysis at SSRL, using in operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy with a custom-made electrochemical cell. In addition, the research team explored photocatalysis applications. They built a photocatalytic water-splitting system using either a standard catalyst of platinum on strontium titanium oxide (Pt/SrTiO ) or the same catalyst coated with molybdenum. Both systems were tested at KAUST with the lights on and off— that is, with and without an energy source driving the water-splitting reaction. When the light was on, the standard Pt/SrTiO catalyst increased hydrogen production for only six hours because the system lost efficiency due to the back reaction. When the lights were then turned off, the amount of hydrogen decreased with time—verifying that significant amounts of the gases were recombining to form water. In contrast, the molybdenum-coated catalyst continuously split water to generate increasing amounts of hydrogen gas for 24 hours, producing about twice as much hydrogen gas as the standard catalyst in one day. In addition, the amount of hydrogen remained stable in the dark, confirming that the coating inhibited water formation. The results are promising, but more work still needs to be done before the catalyst can be used in a practical device.


Patent
Fukuoka University, Zuken Inc., Fuji Machine Manufacturing Co. and Hioki E. E. Corporation | Date: 2015-08-26

Provided is a manufacturing apparatus that manufactures a high-quality manufacturing object by using component information per unit of individual electronic component or per unit of package in a plurality of electronic components that have been packaged. The manufacturing apparatus is a manufacturing apparatus that manufactures a product by taking out each electronic component from packaged components in which a plurality of electronic components are packaged. The manufacturing apparatus is provided with: a component information reading unit that reads component information per unit of electronic component or per unit of package in the packaged components; a manufacturing control unit that controls, using the read component information, the manufacturing treatment of product into which electronic components indicated in the component information are incorporated; and an incorporation information generating unit that generates incorporation information regarding a state of incorporation of each electronic component in the product.


Patent
Fukuoka University, YDC Corporation, Zuken Inc., Fuji Machine Manufacturing Co. and Hioki E.E. Corporation | Date: 2015-06-03

Problem: To safely reflect non-public component information, from among component information on components constituting a production object, to designing information and manufacturing information without leaking to outsiders. Solution: An information administration system configured of: a component information management apparatus (4) including a component information storing unit (41) for storing component information after sectionalizing the component information into public information and non-public information, and also sectionalizing the non-public information into information for designing and information for manufacturing, and an encryption processing unit (42) for encrypting the non-public information; a designing information management apparatus (2) including a first component information receiving unit (24) for receiving the component information, a first decryption unit (25) for decrypting non-public component information for designing, and a designing information storing unit (22) for storing designing information that is designed by adding the received component information thereto; and a manufacturing apparatus (3) including a second decryption unit (33) for decrypting the received non-public component information for manufacturing, and a drive controlling unit (34) for controlling driving of the manufacturing apparatus based on the received manufacturing information and component information.


Markers useful in diagnosing disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) or infectious DIC are provided. In a method for detecting DIC of the present invention, sCD14-ST in a sample is measured. In a method of detecting infectious DIC of the present invention, sCD14-ST and a coagulation-related marker in a sample are measured.


Hirose S.,Fukuoka University
Progress in Brain Research | Year: 2014

The γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A (GABAA receptor) is a ligand-gated chloride channel that mediates major inhibitory functions in the central nervous system. GABAA receptors function mainly as pentamers containing α, β, and either γ or δ subunits. A number of antiepileptic drugs have agonistic effects on GABAA receptors. Hence, dysfunctions of GABAA receptors have been postulated to play important roles in the etiology of epilepsy. In fact, mutations or genetic variations of the genes encoding the α1, α6, β2, β3, γ2, or δ subunits (GABRA1, GABRA6, GABRB2, GABRB3, GABRG2, and GABRD, respectively) have been associated with human epilepsy, both with and without febrile seizures. Epilepsy resulting from mutations is commonly one of following, genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsy (e.g., juvenile myoclonic epilepsy), childhood absence epilepsy, genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures, or Dravet syndrome. Recently, mutations of GABRA1, GABRB2, and GABRB3 were associated with infantile spasms and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. These mutations compromise hyperpolarization through GABAA receptors, which is believed to cause seizures. Interestingly, most of the insufficiencies are not caused by receptor gating abnormalities, but by complex mechanisms, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation, nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, intracellular trafficking defects, and ER stress. Thus, GABAA receptor subunit mutations are now thought to participate in the pathomechanisms of epilepsy, and an improved understanding of these mutations should facilitate our understanding of epilepsy and the development of new therapies. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Ishitsuka K.,Fukuoka University | Tamura K.,Fukuoka University
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2014

Adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATL) is a malignancy of peripheral T lymphocytes caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1), and its prognosis is poor. There are an estimated 5 million to 20 million HTLV-1 infected individuals worldwide; their lifetime risk of developing ATL is 3-5%, and high HTLV-1 proviral loads have been shown to be an independent risk factor. Recent advances in the treatment of ATL are the introduction of treatment targeted against CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4), which is abundantly expressed on most ATL cells, and allogeneic haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation for aggressive ATL. Promising outcomes are also reported with early intervention for indolent ATL with interferon α and zidovudine. Clinical trials should incorporate a validated prognostic index to assess the results, because of the difficulties associated with undertaking large-scale trials and significant diversity of clinical features with ATL, even in the same clinical subtypes (acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering). © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Provided are a tumor proliferation inhibitor and a method for inhibiting tumor proliferation both of which can be applied to a minimally invasive cancer treatment using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. The present invention provides a tumor proliferation inhibitor containing an ultrasound-sensitive substance and an acoustic cavitation phenomenon-enhancing substance, and provides a method for inhibiting tumor proliferation that can exhibit a tumor proliferation-inhibitory effect using the tumor proliferation inhibitor in combination with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound of a degree that is used in ultrasound diagnosis, and that can be applied to a minimally invasive cancer treatment using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound.


Patent
Fukuoka University and Mayatec Co. | Date: 2013-11-27

Disclosed herein is a method for simply inducing an anti-apoptotic effect and/or an anti-necrotic effect in a living cell with good control without administering any drug. The method includes applying an alternating-current voltage to the living cell so that an electric current of 25 A or higher but 75 A or lower flows to induce an anti-apoptotic effect and/or an anti-necrotic effect in the living cell. The living cell used may be a cultured cell. The alternating-current voltage may be applied to a stage member on which a container holding the living cell is placed.


[Problem] Provided are: an ultrasound-guided puncture assist device that is capable of preventing occurrence of operational mistakes or the like when a nerve block or vascular puncture is performed under ultrasonography, an ultrasound-guided puncture method using the ultrasound-guided puncture assist device, and the like. [Solution] An ultrasound-guided puncture assist device with an object of preventing narrowing or the like of a puncture target site for a nerve block or vascular puncture under ultrasonography to thereby assist the puncture by comprising a pulling mechanism for pulling the surface of the puncture target site, such as skin. The use of the ultrasound-guided puncture assist device of the invention can increase the width of the target site tissue where a nerve block or vascular puncture is performed, and thus occurrence of mispuncture is preventable.

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