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Hou Y.,Third Institute of Oceanography | Gao J.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Gu L.,Third Institute of Oceanography | Wang S.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Zeng R.,Third Institute of Oceanography
Journal of Food Processing and Preservation | Year: 2015

This study investigated the effects of agaro-oligosaccharide treatment on the postharvest quality and biochemical changes of cherry tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Var. cerasiforme). Harvested cherry tomatoes were coated with different concentrations of agaro-oligosaccharides and stored at 12±1C and 80-85% humidity. Sound fruit rate and weight loss, respiration intensity, firmness, titratable acid, total sugar and vitamin C content during cold storage were determined. The sound fruit ratio of cherry tomatoes treated with 160 and 120mg/kg agaro-oligosaccharides reached 91 and 90%, respectively, after 14 days of storage at 12±1C, whereas that of the control was only 63%. Agaro-oligosaccharide treatment reduced the consumption of fruit weight, titratable acid and vitamin C contents of cherry tomatoes. In addition, the respiratory peak was delayed and reduced, and fruit firmness was preserved after storage. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed that agaro-oligosaccharides form thin protective films on cherry tomato surfaces. Taken together, our results show that agaro-oligosaccharide coating can efficiently increase the edible quality and extend the shelf life of cherry tomatoes. Practical Applications: Cherry tomato is favored by consumers worldwide for its high nutritional value. However, cherry tomato is perishable during postharvest period and has a short shelf life. Significant efforts have been made to improve existing methods of cherry tomato preservation. This paper reports on the effect of an edible coating of agaro-oligosaccharides on the quality and shelf life of cherry tomato. Agaro-oligosaccharides are easily prepared by enzymolysis and have no toxicity to humans. Our results indicate that agaro-oligosaccharide is an ideal material for the preservation of postharvest cherry tomato. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Source


Wang S.F.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Hong Z.F.,Fujian Engineering College | Lan Y.Y.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Li Y.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | And 6 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2012

The postharvest physiology and technology of potted ficus (Ficus microcarpa L.f.), including the effects of different potting media, storage and transportation conditions, and different postharvest handling procedures, were investigated in order to develop effective methods in controlling defoliation and enhancing postharvest quality in export system. The results showed that the correlation coefficient between the defoliation rate and cytoplasmic membrane permeability, peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) activity, and contents of chlorophyll, malondialdehyde (MDA), soluble sugar and protein in leaves are all higher than 0.7. The best postharvest system technology for exported potted ficus was described: using suitable potting medium of 79% coconut chaff + 20% perlite + 1% water retention agent, irrigating root system with liquid high-K fertilizer diluted to 100 times, spraying the foliage with 800 μg/L 0.004% brassinolides, and storing and transporting at 10°C. These conditions remarkably decreased defoliation rate during 36 days of simulated storage and transportation. Defoliation resistance was related to decreased membrane permeability and MDA content, increased chlorophyll, sugar and protein contents, and improved phenolic acid metabolism through increased POD and CAT activities. Source


Wang S.F.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Li X.M.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Liu S.X.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Wu S.B.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | And 6 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2013

After long term storage and transportation in dark, artistically carved narcissus bulbs will develop yellow leaves and mold, and the calyx will wither. The postharvest physiology and technology of carved narcissus bulbs, including the effects of different storage and transportation conditions, and different postharvest handling procedures, were investigated in order to develop effective methods to enhance postharvest quality. The results showed that the best postharvest system technology for carved narcissus bulbs involved: after carving the bulbs, using water culture with 50 mg/L VitaCat for 14 days, fumigating with 1 ppm 1-MCP for 12 h, packing with polyethylene bags with storage and transport at 4°C. These conditions remarkably decreased the loss of water and chlorophyll, and reduced the content of MDA and extended the postharvest life. The marketable proportion after 36 days of simulated storage and transportation was 94.7%. Source


Wang S.F.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Lan Y.Y.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Li Y.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | Dong J.L.,Fujian Subtropical Horticultural Research Center | And 6 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2013

This experiment studied postharvest physiology and technology of potted Ficus microcarpa L. f., including effects of different media, storage and transportation conditions in the export system. The aim was to understand the defoliation mechanism and to understand effects of postharvest handling on quality. The results showed that the mutuality coefficient between the defoliation rate and cytoplasm membrane permeability, POD and CAT activity, and contents of chlorophyll, MDA, soluble sugar and protein in leaves are all upward of 0.7. The best postharvest system technology for exported potted ficus in this experiment was using a suitable growth medium (79% coconut chaff + 20% perlite + 1% water retention agent), irrigating with liquid GROW MORE K diluted at 100 times, spraying the foliage with 800 μg·L-1 0.004% brassinolides, and storing and transporting the potted ficus at 10°C, which could postpone the degradation of soluble sugars and proteins in leaves and the decreases of chlorophyll content and polyphenols aegis enzyme activity of leaves, improve anti-stress capability during storage and transportation, delay ficus decrepitude and decrease the defoliation rate after 36 days simulative storage and transportation. The temperature domestication before and after storage and transportation at 10°C decreased the defoliation rate of potted ficus. Source

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