Fuda Cancer Hospital

Guangzhou, China

Fuda Cancer Hospital

Guangzhou, China
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Jiang P.,Beijing Hospital and Beijing Institute of Geriatrics | Ren Y.-L.,Peking University | Li J.-L.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | Luo J.,Beijing Hospital and Beijing Institute of Geriatrics
Oncology Letters | Year: 2016

Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality in females worldwide, with the majority of cases reported in developing countries. The molecular mechanisms of this disease are unclear. However, increasing evidence indicates that the expression or over expression of Girdin is associated with a poor prognosis in a variety of cancer types. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential association between Girdin expression, and malignant properties of cervical cancer lesions and He La cells. Girdin protein expression was examined in 87 samples of cervical squamous cell lesions, including intraepithelial neoplasia (grades I and III) and invasive carcinoma, using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. A short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) approach was employed to specifically suppress the expression of Girdin mRNA in HeLa cells in vitro, allowing the role of Girdin in a number of malignant properties to be evaluated. Girdin protein was observed in the cytoplasm of 79/87 (90.8%) cervical cancer lesion specimens. However, no positive Girdin signals were identified in healthy cervical squamous epithelium samples. Furthermore, a significant correlation between Girdin expression and lesion grade was identified (Spearman’s correlation coefficient, 0.566; P<0.001). When Girdin was suppressed by Girdin shRNA, the rate of HeLa cell growth was significantly reduced in vitro (P<0.05). Additional analysis determined that Girdin was associated with serum-deprived induced HeLa apoptosis. Thus, patients with high-grade cervical cancer tumors exhibited a strong expression for Girdin, and Girdin appears to key in HeLa cell proliferation and serum-deprived induced apoptosis, supporting the hypothesis that Girdin may be important in the process of cervical carcinogenesis. © 2016, Spandidos Publications. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Fuda Cancer Hospital, Beijing Hospital and Beijing Institute of Geriatrics and Peking University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncology letters | Year: 2016

Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality in females worldwide, with the majority of cases reported in developing countries. The molecular mechanisms of this disease are unclear. However, increasing evidence indicates that the expression or overexpression of Girdin is associated with a poor prognosis in a variety of cancer types. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the potential association between Girdin expression, and malignant properties of cervical cancer lesions and HeLa cells. Girdin protein expression was examined in 87 samples of cervical squamous cell lesions, including intraepithelial neoplasia (grades I and III) and invasive carcinoma, using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. A short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) approach was employed to specifically suppress the expression of Girdin mRNA in HeLa cells


Jia Y.-H.,Southern Medical University | Zhang Y.-X.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | Li L.-J.,Southern Medical University | Liu Y.-W.,Southern Medical University | And 5 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine | Year: 2012

Objective: To identify the underlying mechanisms of the protective effects of Dingxin Recipe (DXR), a Chinese compound prescription that has been used clinically in China for more than 20 years, on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced arrhythmias in rat model. Methods: A total of 30 rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham group, I/R group, and DXR-pretreated I/R (DXR-I/R) group. Rats in the DXRI/R group were intragastrically administrated with DXR (12.5 g/kg per day) for consecutive 7 days, while rats in the sham and I/R groups were administrated with normal saline. Arrhythmias were introduced by I/R and electrocardiograms (ECG) were recorded. Two-dimensional (2-D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrixassisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Immunohistochemistry, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQPCR), Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were performed to analyze proteins obtained in the above experiments. Results: DXR significantly reduced the incidence and mean duration of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation and dramatically decreased the mortality, as well as arrhythmia score, compared with those of the I/R group. Among successfully identified proteins, prohibitin (PHB) and heart fatty acid binding protein (hFABP) were up-regulated in DXR-pretreated I/R rats compared with those of the I/R rats. In addition, compared with the I/R group, the level of glutathione (GSH) was elevated accompanied by reduced expressions of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and neutrophil infiltration in I/R rats with DXR pretreatment. Conclusions: DXR could alleviate I/R-induced arrhythmias, which might be related to increased expression of PHB. The enhanced expression of PHB prevented against the depletion of GSH and consequently inhibited apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, up-regulation of PHB might ameliorate I/R-induced cell death and leakage of hFABP by suppressing neutrophil infiltration and IL-6 expressions. © The Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012.


Peng Y.,Xiamen University | Chen J.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | Shao W.,Xiamen University | Wang F.,Xiamen University | And 6 more authors.
Xenotransplantation | Year: 2011

Background: Memory T cells are a significant barrier to the induction of transplant tolerance. Our previous study demonstrated that multiple applications of anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody (mAb) could significantly inhibit CD4 + memory T cells from mediating rejection of cardiac allografts. Now, we sought to explore the effect and mechanism of anti-CD44 mAb on the rejection of islet allografts and xenografts mediated by CD4 + memory T cells. Methods: In this study, we first engrafted skin grafts of C57BL/6 (B6) mice or Dark Agouti (DA) rats onto BALB/c mice to induce donor-reactive memory T cells. We adoptively transferred purified CD4 + memory T cells to BALB/c origin nude mice and then transplanted islet allografts and xenografts to produce the Allo-Tx and Xeno-Tx models, respectively. We subsequently administered multiple anti-CD44 mAb and observed changes in the survival times of the islet grafts. Results: In the Allo-Tx model, the mean survival time (MST) of the grafts was 7.7 days in the isotype group, and 20.3 days in the anti-CD44 group. In the Xeno-Tx model, the MST of the grafts was 7.2 days in the isotype group and 8.2 days in the anti-CD44 group. Compared with the isotype group, CD4 + T cells on the grafts in the anti-CD44 group were significantly decreased in both the Allo-Tx and Xeno-Tx models, but the proportion of CD4 + memory T cells in the spleens and draining lymph nodes of the recipient nude mice in the anti-CD44 group was significantly decreased in the Allo-Tx model, while it was increased in the Xeno-Tx model. The production of donor-specific IgG antibody in the anti-CD44 group did not vary in the Allo-Tx model, while it was markedly elevated in the Xeno-Tx model. Furthermore, the expression of interferon gamma in the anti-CD44 group was markedly decreased in both the Allo-Tx and Xeno-Tx models, while the expression of IL-4 in the anti-CD44 group was significantly increased only in the Xeno-Tx model. Conclusion: Multiple applications of the anti-CD44 mAb could significantly inhibit donor-reactive CD4 + memory T cells from rejecting grafts via a Th1-dependent pathway, but xenoreactive CD4 + memory T cells can avoid the effects of anti-CD44 mAb to reject islet xenografts via a Th2-dependent pathway. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


PubMed | Fuda Cancer Hospital and Sun Yat Sen University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncotarget | Year: 2016

To evaluate the use of computed tomography image-guided percutaneous cryoablation for recurrent retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcomas (RPSs).Adverse events were limited to grades 1 and 2, included fever (n = 19), local pain (n = 11), emesis (n = 10), frostbite (n = 6), and nerve injury (n = 1). Fever was more frequent in the large tumor group (15.8%) than in small tumor group (1.9%) (P = 0.008). Median PFS and OS were 37.0 7.7 months (range, 4-39 months) and 43.0 5.9 months (range, 6-54 months), respectively. PFS and OS were significantly longer in the small tumor group than in the large tumor group (P = 0.011 and P = 0.015, respectively), but the response rate (82.7% vs. 72.8%, P = 0.240) did not differ significantly. On univariate analysis, tumor size, tumor invasion grade, and distant metastasis were significant prognostic factors for PFS and OS. On multivariate analysis, a tumor size 10 cm was an independent negative prognostic factor for PFS and OS after cryoablation (HR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.27-12.50, P = 0.018 and HR: 4.33, 95% CI: 1.41-13.26, P = 0.010, respectively).Data from 72 patients with recurrent RPSs who underwent percutaneous cryoablation were reviewed retrospectively. The prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and efficacy based on mRECIST criteria were analysis. Adverse events were compared according to tumor size (<10 and 10 cm).Minimally invasive percutaneous cryoablation was safe and efficacious for recurrent RPSs.


Niu L.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | Niu L.,Fuda Oncological Cryotherapy Research Institute | He L.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | He L.,Fuda Oncological Cryotherapy Research Institute | And 10 more authors.
Cryobiology | Year: 2012

Objective: To assess the safety and feasibility of percutaneous cryoablation on pancreatic cancer via ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) guidance. Materials and methods: This retrospective review was approved by the institutional review board and of informed consent. Thirty-two patients (18 men and 14 women; median age 62; age range, 30-77. years) with pancreatic cancer (stage II/III/IV, 3/11/18) treated with percutaneous US and CT guided cryoablations between February 2009 and February 2010 were eligible for this review. Thirteen tumors in pancreatic head and 19 in pancreatic body and/or tail measuring 2-11. cm (mean, 5.2. cm ± 8 [standard deviation]) were ablated with 49 procedures in total. Feasibility was analyzed by enhanced CT 1-3. months post procedure and safety was assessed by clinical signs, symptoms and laboratory results. Results: Neither procedural death nor serious complications occurred. Fifteen tumors (46.9%) smaller than 5. cm were successfully ablated by one session of cryoablation. Twenty-seven patients experienced a 50% reduction in pain score, 22 experienced a 50% decrease in analgesic consumption and 16 experienced a 20 increase in Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Score. Partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) turned up in 9 and 21 patients, respectively, lesions in whom were identified controlled by none enhancement on enhanced CT. Mean and median survival was 15.9 and 12.6. months, respectively. The 6-, 12- and 24-month survival rates were 82.8%, 54.7% and 27.3%, respectively. Conclusion: US and CT guided percutaneous cryoablation is a safe and promising local treatment for pancreatic cancer. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.


Niu L.-Z.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | He L.-H.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | Zhou L.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | Yang Z.-Z.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Chinese Journal of Oncology | Year: 2012

Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of percutaneous cryoablation (PCC) and 125I seed implantation combined with chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods Sixty-seven patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (6 in stage III, 61 in stage IV) received PCC and 125I seed implantation combined with concomitant gemcitabine hydrochloride and DDP chemotherapy. The clinical benefit response (CBR), survival rate and therapy-related complications were assessed. Results All patients except one were followed up over 1 year. The 6-month and 1-year survival rates were 84.8% and 33.4%, respectively. The median progression free survival were 6.3 months and 5.5 months in the group stage III and group stage IV (P > 0.05), respectively, while the overall survival was 9. I months in the group stage III and 11.0 months in the group stage IV (P > 0.05). CR, PR and SI) were achieved in 5, 8, 54 patients, respectively. Fifty-four and 50 in the 67 patients experienced a ≥ 50% reduction of pain score and analgesic consumption, respectively, 18 patients experienced a ≥ 2kg weight gaining, and KPS was increasing from 71.2 ±0.4 to (90.0 ±0.3, P < 0.05), the overall benefit rate was 80.6%. No serious therapy-related complications except pancreatic fistula accompanied abdominal hemorrhage, bile leakage, acute pancreatitis and needle track seeding in 1, 1,2 and 1 case, respectively. Conclusion Percutaneous cryoablation and 125I seed implantation combined with chemotherapy are effective and safe for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer.


Chiu D.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Chiu D.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | Zhou G.,Chinese Academy of Sciences | Zhou G.,Fuda Cancer Hospital | And 9 more authors.
Diagnostic Pathology | Year: 2013

Background: Many previous studies demonstrated that cell adhesion molecules CD44v6 and integrin-β1 had been extensively investigated as potential prognostic markers of various cancers. However, data in PC are scarce.Methods: We now investigate CD44v6 and integrin-β1 mRNA expression in PBMC by a triplex real-time RT-PCR assay and protein expression in plasma by ELISA. All specimens were collected from 54 PC patients who received the treatment of cryosurgery as well as 20 healthy individuals (control).Results: The mRNA and protein expression levels of CD44v6 and integrin-β1 in patients were significantly increased compared with control group (P<0.05). The high CD44v6 mRNA and protein expression were significantly correlated with clinical stage, tumor differentiation, LNM, liver metastasis and decreased median DFS (P<0.05), while the high integrin-β1 mRNA and protein expression were significantly correlated with clinical stage, LNM, liver metastasis and decreased median DFS (P<0.05). Clinical stage, LNM, liver metastasis, CD44v6 mRNA and protein expression were the independent predictors of survival in PC patients (P<0.05). Moreover, CD44v6 and integrin-β1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly decreased in patients in 3 months after cryosurgery (P<0.05). No significant difference was found in CD44v6 mRNA and protein expression between patients in 3 months after cryosurgery and control group (P>0.05).Conclusion: CD44v6 and integrin-β1 mRNA and protein expression in blood may serve as biomarkers for the development and metastasis of PC, and as prognostic indicators for PC. They may become useful predictors in assessing outcome of PC patients after cryosurgery.Virtual slides: The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4035308681009006. © 2013 Chiu et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | Fuda Cancer Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zhonghua zhong liu za zhi [Chinese journal of oncology] | Year: 2013

To assess the efficacy and safety of percutaneous cryoablation (PCC) and (125)I seed implantation combined with chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer.Sixty-seven patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (6 in stage III, 61 in stage IV) received PCC and (125)I seed implantation combined with concomitant gemcitabine hydrochloride and DDP chemotherapy. The clinical benefit response (CBR), survival rate and therapy-related complications were assessed.All patients except one were followed up over 1 year. The 6-month and 1-year survival rates were 84.8% and 33.4%, respectively. The median progression free survival were 6.3 months and 5.5 months in the group stage III and group stage IV (P > 0.05), respectively, while the overall survival was 9.1 months in the group stage III and 11.0 months in the group stage IV (P > 0.05). CR,PR and SD were achieved in 5, 8, 54 patients, respectively. Fifty-four and 50 in the 67 patients experienced a 50% reduction of pain score and analgesic consumption, respectively, 18 patients experienced a 2 kg weight gaining, and KPS was increasing from 71.2 0.4 to (90.0 0.3, P < 0.05), the overall benefit rate was 80.6%. No serious therapy-related complications except pancreatic fistula accompanied abdominal hemorrhage, bile leakage, acute pancreatitis and needle track seeding in 1, 1, 2 and 1 case, respectively.Percutaneous cryoablation and (125)I seed implantation combined with chemotherapy are effective and safe for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer.


PubMed | Fuda Cancer Hospital
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Cryobiology | Year: 2012

To assess the safety and feasibility of percutaneous cryoablation on pancreatic cancer via ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) guidance.This retrospective review was approved by the institutional review board and of informed consent. Thirty-two patients (18 men and 14 women; median age 62; age range, 30-77 years) with pancreatic cancer (stage II/III/IV, 3/11/18) treated with percutaneous US and CT guided cryoablations between February 2009 and February 2010 were eligible for this review. Thirteen tumors in pancreatic head and 19 in pancreatic body and/or tail measuring 2-11 cm (mean, 5.2 cm8 [standard deviation]) were ablated with 49 procedures in total. Feasibility was analyzed by enhanced CT 1-3 months post procedure and safety was assessed by clinical signs, symptoms and laboratory results.Neither procedural death nor serious complications occurred. Fifteen tumors (46.9%) smaller than 5 cm were successfully ablated by one session of cryoablation. Twenty-seven patients experienced a 50% reduction in pain score, 22 experienced a 50% decrease in analgesic consumption and 16 experienced a 20 increase in Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Score. Partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) turned up in 9 and 21 patients, respectively, lesions in whom were identified controlled by none enhancement on enhanced CT. Mean and median survival was 15.9 and 12.6 months, respectively. The 6-, 12- and 24-month survival rates were 82.8%, 54.7% and 27.3%, respectively.US and CT guided percutaneous cryoablation is a safe and promising local treatment for pancreatic cancer.

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