Fruit Trees Research Unit

Caserta, Italy

Fruit Trees Research Unit

Caserta, Italy
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Tuppo L.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | Alessandri C.,Centers for Molecular Allergology | Alessandri C.,Center for Molecular Allergology | Pasquariello M.S.,Fruit Trees Research Unit | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2017

The consumption of pomegranate is increasing as it is considered a health-promoting food. Nevertheless, it can trigger allergic reactions, sometimes severe. The LTP Pun g 1 is the only pomegranate allergen so far reported. Based on preliminary clinical observations, the main aim of this study was the investigation of still unknown allergens contained in this fruit. Pommaclein, a homologue of peamaclein, the peach allergen Pru p 7, was isolated, identified by protein sequencing, and characterized as an IgE-binding protein by different test systems. RP-HPLC protein profiles revealed significant variations of LTP and pommaclein content in the red pulp of selected cultivars and accessions. Conversely, the mesocarp appeared free of proteins and much richer in antioxidants. In conclusion, a new allergen has been identified, and it could contribute to improving allergy diagnosis. The study highlights that pomegranate mesocarp could represent a rich and safe source of nutraceuticals also for allergic subjects. © 2017 American Chemical Society.


Petriccione M.,Fruit Trees Research Unit | Forte V.,The Second University of Naples | Valente D.,The Second University of Naples | Ciniglia C.,The Second University of Naples
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2013

Catechol is a highly toxic organic pollutant, usually abundant in the waste effluents of industrial processes and agricultural activities. The environmental sources of catechol include pesticides, wood preservatives, tanning lotion, cosmetic creams, dyes, and synthetic intermediates. Genotoxicity of catechol at a concentration range 5 × 10-1-5 mM was evaluated by applying random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and time-lapse DNA laddering tests using onion (Allium cepa) root cells as the assay system. RAPD analysis revealed polymorphisms in the nucleotidic sequence of DNA that reflected the genotoxic potential of catechol to provoke point mutations, or deletions, or chromosomal rearrangements. Time-lapse DNA laddering test provided evidence that catechol provoked DNA necrosis and apoptosis. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining could distinguish apoptotic from necrotic cells in root cells of A. cepa. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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