Fresno, CA, United States
Fresno, CA, United States

Fresno Pacific University also known as FPU is an accredited Christian university located in Fresno, California, United States. It was founded in 1944 by the Pacific District Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches. The university awarded its first Bachelor of Arts degree in 1965. The first master's degree program was introduced in 1975. Wikipedia.


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Dahlquist-Willard R.M.,Fresno Pacific University | Marshall M.N.,Pennsylvania State University | Betts S.L.,Fresno Pacific University | Tuell-Todd C.C.,Fresno Pacific University | And 2 more authors.
Biosystems Engineering | Year: 2016

Soil solarisation uses solar heating for management of soilborne pests including weed seeds. Because soil temperatures under solarisation fluctuate diurnally, models predicting weed seed inactivation as a function of time and fluctuating temperatures are needed to provide accurate treatment guidelines. Inactivation times for Brassica nigra (black mustard) seeds in moist sand were determined at constant temperatures of 42, 46, 50, and 54 °C. Logistic and Weibull models predicting inactivation at each constant temperature were developed with nonlinear regression. The Weibull model was combined with the Arrhenius equation to incorporate temperature dependence, and nonlinear regression was repeated across temperatures to develop a combined Weibull–Arrhenius model. Four validation trials were conducted, using diurnally-fluctuating temperature regimens, to evaluate accuracy of the Weibull–Arrhenius model to predict inactivation with fluctuating temperatures. Seeds reached complete mortality by 3 h at 54 °C, 16 h at 50 °C, 72 h at 46 °C, and 240 h at 42 °C. At 42, 46 and 50 °C, logistic and Weibull models predicted similar times to mortality. Across temperatures, the Weibull shape parameter estimate was 1.03 at 95% CI, indicating sufficiency of first order models to describe B. nigra seed inactivation. The Weibull–Arrhenius model accurately predicted mortality under fluctuating diurnal temperatures, varying (P < 0.05) at only 2 of 19 sampling times. These results indicate that the Weibull–Arrhenius model, constructed from constant temperature data, can predict seed mortality in the range of diurnally-fluctuating soil temperatures commonly occurring during field solarisation. This information provides IPM decision support for end users of solarisation. © 2016 IAgrE


PubMed | University of Utah, Utah State University, Fresno Pacific University and Brigham Young University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: School psychology quarterly : the official journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association | Year: 2016

In 2 studies, we evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of peer-mediated, school-based discrete trial training (DTT) for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In the first, 6 typically developing elementary-age students were trained to use DTT procedures to teach target academic skills to 3 students with ASD who had been educated in a self-contained setting. A multiple probe-across-tutors design was applied to evaluate the accuracy with which the tutors implemented the DTT protocol. Results of the study indicated that training was effective in increasing the integrity of implementation of the DTT protocol. In addition, improvements in integrity were maintained following termination of training. To assess the effectiveness of the ability of previously untrained tutors to teach new, target behaviors to different children with ASD, a second study was conducted. Five of the 6 tutors taught 2 or 3 skills in a multiple probe fashion to children with ASD whom they had not previously tutored. Results suggest that peer tutors effectively generalized skills, as shown by participants with ASD who demonstrated rapid improvements in level and trend of target behaviors. Observations of social engagement during unstructured periods were conducted prior to and following intervention as a measure of social validity. Substantial increases in duration of engagement were noted, suggesting that peer-mediated DTT may result in meaningful improvements in both academic skills and inclusion with peers. (PsycINFO Database Record


Hatten T.D.,University of Idaho | Hatten T.D.,Invertebrate Ecology Inc. | Dahlquist R.M.,Fresno Pacific University | Eigenbrode S.D.,University of Idaho | Bosque-Perez N.A.,University of Idaho
Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata | Year: 2010

Conversion from conventional-tillage (CT) to no-tillage (NT) agriculture can affect pests and beneficial organisms in various ways. NT has been shown to reduce the relative abundance and feeding damage of pea leaf weevil (PLW), Sitona lineatus L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in spring pea, especially during the early-season colonization period in the Palouse region of northwest Idaho. Pitfall traps were used to quantify tillage effects on activity-density of PLW in field experiments conducted during 2001 and 2002. As capture rate of pitfall traps for PLW might be influenced by effects of tillage treatment, two mark-recapture studies were employed to compare trapping rates in NT and CT spring pea during 2003. Also in 2003, direct sampling was used to estimate PLW densities during the colonization period, and to assess PLW feeding damage on pea. PLW activity-density was significantly lower in NT relative to CT during the early colonization period (May) of 2001 and 2002, and during the late colonization period (June) of 2002. Activity-density was not different between treatments during the early emergence (July) or late emergence (August) periods in either year of the study. Trap capture rates did not differ between tillage systems in the mark-recapture studies, suggesting that pitfall trapping provided unbiased estimates of PLW relative abundances. PLW absolute densities and feeding damage were significantly lower in NT than in CT. These results indicate that NT provides a pest suppression benefit in spring pea. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Netherlands Entomological Society.


Walling S.M.,Fresno Pacific University | Suvak M.K.,Suffolk University | Howard J.M.,National Center for PTSD | Taft C.T.,National Center for PTSD | Murphy C.M.,University of Maryland College Park
Psychotherapy | Year: 2012

Despite evidence that the working alliance (WA) is an important factor in psychotherapy outcome and that race/ethnicity plays an important role in the processes of therapy, few studies have directly examined associations between WA and race/ethnicity. These relationships may be particularly salient for difficult-to-engage populations, such as men participating in treatment for intimate partner violence. The current study examined WA ratings in a sample of 107 male intimate partner violence perpetrators attending a 16-week cognitive-behavioral group program. Approximately 50% of these participants were Caucasian and 50% were members of a racial/ethnic minority group (African American, Asian American, Hispanic, and American Indian). Growth curve modeling was used to assess changes in both therapist and client WA ratings across four time points during therapy. Findings indicated that there was no mean level of change in therapist WA ratings over time. However, clients' WA ratings demonstrated a reliable, steady increase across sessions. A significant interaction between WA and race/ethnicity emerged such that Caucasian participants reported a significant increase in WA over time, whereas members of racial/ethnic minority group did not report a consistent pattern of change. The interaction between client race/ethnicity and WA was also a significant predictor of treatment outcome at 6-month follow-up. © 2011 American Psychological Association.


Davis E.J.,Fresno Pacific University | Grows K.F.,Washington State University | Siems W.F.,Washington State University | Hill H.H.,Washington State University
International Journal for Ion Mobility Spectrometry | Year: 2014

Voltage Sweep Ion Mobility Spectrometry (VSIMS) has been applied to complex samples using electrospray ionization (ESI). The usable range of VSIMS has been extended from that obtained in previous studies where only volatile compounds were investigated. Using ESI, VSIMS was evaluated with compounds with reduced mobility values as low as 0.3 V2cm−1 s−1. The primary advantage of VSIMS is to enable a drift time ion mobility spectrometer (DTIMS) to detect both fast and slow moving ions at optimal resolving power, thus improving the peak capacity. In this work ESI-VSIMS was applied to a series of small peptides and drugs spanning a large range of reduced mobility values in order to demonstrate ESI-VSIMS to separation. To demonstrate improved peak capacity of IMS with voltage scan operation, oligomers of silicone oil provided a series of evenly-spaced peaks, ranging in reduced mobility values from 0.85 to 0.3 V2cm−1 s−1. The peak capacity of 61 for a standard IMS was improved to 102 when voltage sweep operation was employed. In addition, VSIMS increased the average resolving power of the DTIMS from 66 to 106 for silicone oil. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Rosik C.H.,Link Care Center | Rosik C.H.,Fresno Pacific University | Soria A.,Fresno Pacific University
Journal of Trauma and Dissociation | Year: 2012

In the present study we surveyed 131 adults seeking psychotherapy and pastoral care in an intensive outpatient psychotherapy program for full-time religious workers. We sought to determine whether dissociation and alexithymia are associated with spiritual well-being. We utilized the Dissociative Experiences Scale-II (DES-II), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWB) as well as the subscales of these instruments in a series of linear multiple regression analyses. DES-II total scores were inversely related to SWB total scores. No association was found between alexithymia and SWB, nor did alexithymia moderate the relationship between dissociation and SWB. Subscale analyses revealed that lower SWB and Existential Well-Being (EWB) were associated with greater nonpathological dissociation (DES-NP), which was unrelated to Religious Well-Being (RWB). By contrast, lower RWB was predicted by higher pathological dissociation (DES-T), which displayed no relationship to SWB or EWB. We conclude with a discussion of some implications of these findings. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Shin H.J.,Fuller Theological Seminary | Eriksson C.B.,Fuller Theological Seminary | Walling S.M.,Fresno Pacific University | Lee H.,Fuller Theological Seminary | Putman K.M.,Fuller Theological Seminary
Mental Health, Religion and Culture | Year: 2011

Organisations providing social services in communities of high crime and violence must address staff well-being. The current study surveyed 284 urban community development workers from faith-based organisations in five US cities. The study explored the effects of race and ethnicity on service utilisation and perceived need using binomial logistic regression. Race and ethnicity significantly predicted medical service utilisation, indicating that Caucasian participants were five times more likely and African-American participants were 3.8 times more likely than Latino/a participants to utilise medical services. Race and ethnicity did not predict differences in use of psychological or spiritual services, nor of perceived need for services. Furthermore, volunteer staffs were approximately four times more likely than paid staff to report self-addressing their psychological and spiritual needs rather than utilising services, despite a felt need for support. Barriers to resource utilisation and implications for policies and practices of urban community development organisations are discussed. © 2011 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Hauck B.C.,Washington State University | Davis E.J.,Fresno Pacific University | Clark A.E.,Washington State University | Siems W.F.,Washington State University | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Mass Spectrometry | Year: 2014

Ion mobility spectrometry is widely used in national defense areas, and field-deployed IMS units are subject to various environmental conditions; one of the most important and least controlled being the humidity of the sample and drift gas. Varying drift gas water content can significantly alter the drift time and reduce the mobility constant (K0 value) of the ion. While the effect of drift gas water content has been previously characterized, no means to quantitatively measure the water content of the drift gas under field conditions have been developed. In this work, using an IMS-TOFMS instrument capable of high precision (±0.005 cm2 V-1 s -1 or better) measurements of K0 values, we investigated the protonated monomer and proton-bound dimer ions of dimethyl methylphosphonate as standards that are sensitive and insensitive, respectively, to the formation of water cluster ions. It was found that the ratio of mobilities of these two ions could measure the water content of the drift gas in field-deployed instruments. When water vapor was added in the presence of an ammonia dopant, K0 was found to decrease as a function of water content to a lesser degree than under conditions without dopant. This study was conducted at atmospheric pressure and at temperatures from 30 °C to 150 °C. The experimental data were supported by complementary density functional theory calculations that examined the interactions of the DMMP monomer with successive number of waters. The reduced ion mobility cross-sections in N2 were subsequently predicted using the trajectory method. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 605.63K | Year: 2015

The Supporting Transfers in Reaching Educational Aspirations in Math and Science (STREAMS) Program at Fresno Pacific University (FPU) will target increasing the number of community college transfer students who obtain science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) baccalaureate degrees and will build on an existing partnership between the university and the College of the Sequoias (COS). STREAMS will identify a diverse population of academically talented community college students with financial need and recruit these students to transfer to math, biology, chemistry, or environmental science program at the university. This project will enhance STEM collaborations between a community college and a four-year institution and increase the number of STEM graduates from populations traditionally underrepresented in STEM including first-generation, Hispanic, and low-income students through recruitment efforts that focus on these groups. In so doing it will increase the number of STEM role models for the younger members of these groups and advance research and practice regarding effective STEM scholarship programs and student support services for transfer students from underrepresented groups. The project will enable the university to continue to develop, apply, evaluate, and advance theories and practices that increase STEM baccalaureate degree attainment among community college transfer students such as articulated transfer agreements, cohort building activities, mentoring, transition-to-university programming, upper-division STEM tutoring, study groups, and graduation guarantees.

The university will augment student support structures to ensure that at least 85% of the scholars obtain a baccalaureate degree within two years of transferring to the university. The project will enhance a number of existing student support services as well as services initiated through a collaboration on a Title V Hispanic Serving Institutions grant program targeting STEM students. These enhancements will include the formation of cohorts, two-year Graduation Guarantees for scholars, a special seminar designed for scholars, robust faculty-student mentoring, upper division STEM tutoring, STEM retention strategies, and Supplemental Instruction. It will enable at least 80% of S-STEM scholars to secure employment or enter a graduate program in a STEM field within one year of graduation. STREAMS will better prepare STEM students for the workforce or graduate programs by providing key support services and activities, including one-on-one STEM career counseling, GRE preparation, job shadowing at local STEM businesses, internship and research opportunities, field trips to STEM businesses and graduate schools, and workshops with STEM industry experts.


PubMed | Fresno Pacific University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Psychotherapy (Chicago, Ill.) | Year: 2012

Despite evidence that the working alliance (WA) is an important factor in psychotherapy outcome and that race/ethnicity plays an important role in the processes of therapy, few studies have directly examined associations between WA and race/ethnicity. These relationships may be particularly salient for difficult-to-engage populations, such as men participating in treatment for intimate partner violence. The current study examined WA ratings in a sample of 107 male intimate partner violence perpetrators attending a 16-week cognitive-behavioral group program. Approximately 50% of these participants were Caucasian and 50% were members of a racial/ethnic minority group (African American, Asian American, Hispanic, and American Indian). Growth curve modeling was used to assess changes in both therapist and client WA ratings across four time points during therapy. Findings indicated that there was no mean level of change in therapist WA ratings over time. However, clients WA ratings demonstrated a reliable, steady increase across sessions. A significant interaction between WA and race/ethnicity emerged such that Caucasian participants reported a significant increase in WA over time, whereas members of racial/ethnic minority group did not report a consistent pattern of change. The interaction between client race/ethnicity and WA was also a significant predictor of treatment outcome at 6-month follow-up.

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