Santa Barbara, CA, United States
Santa Barbara, CA, United States

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Patent
Freedom Photonics LLC | Date: 2016-02-18

In various embodiments, a monolithic integrated transmitter, comprising an on-chip laser source and a modulator structure capable of generating advanced modulation format signals based on amplitude and phase modulation are described.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.91K | Year: 2015

Tactical Engagement Simulation System (TESS) is a key training system for using weapons and simulating real combat experience for US and allied troops. In this system, laser transmitters, and distributed optical receivers are mounted and aligned to the weapon barrels. Optical receivers are mounted on helmet halos and vests that the troops wear, as well as various locations around the perimeter and surface of vehicles that participate in the exercise. A free-space optical link is established each time when a weapon is fired, and limited amount of data is transmitted based on the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement Simulation (MILES) standard. Freedom Photonics will develop the next generation laser transmitters for Tactical Engagement Simulation Systems (TESS). These new laser transmitter products will be based on high-power, eye-safe 1550 nm diode lasers modulated at high speeds. The higher eye-safety threshold at this wavelength allows for the average link optical power to be increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude, improving the optical link range and communications reliability many-fold. In addition, the TESS laser transmitters will include GPS coordinate acquisition and transmission, as well as modern Forward Error Correction (FEC) techniques that further improve the link reliability.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.95K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT:The overall technical objective for this effort is to develop a range of miniaturized integrated optical sources for alkali-atom based systems, including atomic clocks, inertial measurements systems, and cold-atom systems. These components should have a performance matching or exceeding todays state-of-art discrete components that are typically used in such systems. To achieve this goal, Freedom Photonics is proposing to develop an GaAs photonic integration platform that can be applied to Alkali-Atom systems and enable these future compact and ruggedized solutions. The initial target is to address Rubidium-atom systems in the 780-795nm range, however, the base platform to be developed is applicable over the full 600nm to 1,000nm range.BENEFIT:The development of compact photonic integrated sources will allow a wide range of alkali based systems to be realized with significantly reduced Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) compared to todays systems based on discrete optical components, which is of fundamental importance to many defense and commercial applications. The main application areas for this photonic integration technology are: atomic clocks, pump sources for Rubidium Ring Lasers, Cold-Atom Systems and Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL).


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2015

In this program, Freedom Photonics will develop high-power, high-bandwidth balanced photodetectors for use in RF photonic links.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2016

In this program, Freedom Photonics will develop and build a robust, low C-SWaP laser source with improved performance over current technology, to be incorporated into improved FOS interrogator systems. The laser will be 40nm continuously tunable around C-band, with fast sweep rate. The laser interrogator module to be developed will be based on our advanced monolithic, fast-tunable laser and receiver technology, leading to ultra-low SWaP with smaller FOS laser interrogator module, two orders of magnitude smaller than existing technology, and interrogator mass less than 100 grams. The configuration will be rugged, compatible with fuel, fuel vapor, shock, and vibration.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.94K | Year: 2016

Freedom Photonics proposes to develop custom high-power optical comb sources at 1180nm which will enable low- cost high capacity CMOS photonic components to be used in high performance computing systems. To meet cost, capacity and power restrictions on future generations exascale computing, CMOS photonics will be required. The optical source Freedom Photonics is developing complements CMOS photonics through high wall-plug efficiency (>50%), and cost sharing, a single source can feed thousands of CMOS transceivers. Phase I will demonstrate the concept and reduce risk of a phase II effort. This will be done through demonstration of highly efficient 1180nm EPI material and the development of GaAs based opticxal comb source prototypes. To support ever more powerful supercomputers, data communications links must meet very challenging requirements in cost, capacity and power consumption. CMOS photonics together with the shared optical source that is here proposed has the potential to improve these factors by orders of magnitude and is a requirement for the United States to maintain its lead in the development of next generation high performance computing systems. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The source technology is applicable to all markets CMOS photonics competes in, this includes the extremely large datacenter market.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.95K | Year: 2016

Freedom Photonics proposes to develop custom Photonic ICs to allow for dynamic optical packet-switched Tbps optical networks for supercomputers, LAN or data center applications. General statement of how this problem is being addressed: The problem is being addressed through fast-tunable transmitters and optical burst mode receivers. What is to be done in Phase I?: Phase I will address the network design, device design and key technology demonstrations, preparing the ground and removing risk for Phase II. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The transceivers developed have wide commercial applications in data center and telecom markets.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.96K | Year: 2016

Highpower (kilowattclass) lasers are of great interest to the Department of Energy (DOE) and other commercial users, for many areas of accelerator applications: for implementation of future colliders, in generation and manipulation of electron beams, in electromagnetic radiation and particle beam generation. For many of these and other applications, it is required that these lasers operate at high repetition rates and short, subpicosecond pulse widths, with greater than 20% electrical to optical efficiencies. The laser technology of choice to meet these requirements is solidstate lasers, which use gain media based on crystals or glasses doped with rare earth or transition metal ions. Of particular interest are Erbium and Thulium fiber lasers emitting in the 1.5–1.6 and 1.7–2.1 μm wavelength ranges, respectively. Systems based on the current state of the art are unable to meet the efficiency requirements sought by DOE. Traditionally, the wallplug efficiency of fiber lasers has been limited by three factors – the opticaltooptical conversion efficiency of the fiber gain medium, the wallplug efficiency of the semiconductor pump source, and the optical losses associated with coupling the semiconductor pump into the dualclad fiber. The work proposed herein will enable a dramatic improvement in the system wallplug efficiency of fiber lasers for accelerator technology by simultaneously addressing all three of these issues. Resonant pumping of Erbium and Thulium fiber lasers offers significantly reduced quantum defect (and hence high opticaltooptical conversion efficiency) compared to pumping at shorter wavelengths. By directly pumping the upper level of the laser with a long wavelength pump, the energy loss associated with nonradiative decay to the upper laser level can be avoided, improving overall efficiency. Unfortunately the wallplug efficiency of long wavelength fibercoupled InPbase diode pumps is low (35% at 1.5 μm and 15% at 1.9 μm). This prevents the resonant pumping approach from yielding significant improvements in total system efficiency. To address this problem, this program will develop high power fibercoupled laser diode modules operating at 1.5 and 1.9 μm. The proposed approach is expected to make a leap forward in efficiency, ultimately delivering >50% and >20% rated power conversion efficiency at 1.5 and 1.9 μm, respectively; these projected values are inclusive of the optical losses associated with fiber coupling. The envisioned product at the end of this program will be a fibercoupled module that can be incorporated into a fieldspecific system. Key Words: diode laser, laser pump, high power laser, high efficiency laser, long wavelength laser, accelerators, fiber lasers. This program will develop high efficiency and high power diode laser pumps operating at wavelengths around 1550 nm and 1900 nm. These high performance laser pumps will enable the application of Erbium and Thulium doped fiber lasers in DOE accelerators, as well as in other high impact commercial areas.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.97K | Year: 2016

Dryden (Armstrong) Flight Research Center has developed a 4-fiber interrogation system for Fiber Optic Smart Structures (FOSS) sensor networks interrogation. Replacing the expensive, bulky, mechanically tuned swept laser technology used in the FOS system will help reduce the system cost, size and weight, and enable massive deployment. In this program, Freedom Photonics proposes to develop a novel, inexpensive semiconductor based widely tunable laser, which can be tuned using simple tuning algorithms and control.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.99K | Year: 2016

The objective of this program is to develop, demonstrate and implement an integrated optical transmitter for RZ-DPSK modulation for integration into modems for the international space station (ISS). Conventional optical transmitters are based on commercially available discrete components. These have several fiber interconnects which leads to increased optical loss, reduced reliability in a space environment and increased footprint in a an otherwise space constrained optical modem. Photonic integrated circuit technology promises to integrate these functions on a single monolithic chip implemented in rad hard Indium Phosphide technology. This will lead to a miniaturized compact implementation, compatible with wafer-scale manufacturing.

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