Anderson, Nebraska, United States
Anderson, Nebraska, United States

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Mohler J.L.,Roswell Park Cancer Institute | Kantoff P.W.,Dana Farber Brigham and Womens Cancer Center | Armstrong A.J.,Duke Cancer Institute | Bahnson R.R.,Ohio State University | And 30 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2014

Prostate cancer has surpassed lung cancer as the most common cancer in men in the United States. The NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer based on clinical evidence and expert consensus. NCCN Panel guidance on treatment decisions for patients with localized disease is represented in this version. Significant updates for early disease include distinction between active surveillance and observation, a new section on principles of imaging, and revisions to radiation recommendations. The full version of these guidelines, including treatment of patients with advanced disease, can be found online at the NCCN website. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2014, All rights reserved.


Crawford J.,Duke Cancer Institute | Armitage J.,Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center | Balducci L.,H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute | Becker P.S.,University of Washington | And 17 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2013

Febrile neutropenia, a common side effect of myelosup-pressive chemotherapy in patients with cancer, can result in prolonged hospitalization and broad-spectrum antibiotic use, often prompting treatment delays or dose reductions of drug regimens. Prophylactic use of myeloid growth factors (mainly the colony-stimulating factors filgrastim and pegfilgrastim) in patients of heightened risk can reduce the severity and duration of febrile neutropenia. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Myeloid Growth Factors provide recommendations on the use of these agents mainly in the oncology setting based on clinical evidence and expert consensus. This version includes revisions surrounding the issue of timing of pegfilgrastim administration. It also includes new sections on tbo-filgrastim, a recently approved agent that is biologically similar to filgrastim, and the role of myeloid growth factors in the hematopoietic cell transplant setting. © JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.


O'Brien S.,University of Texas | Radich J.P.,Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center | Abboud C.N.,University of Washington | Akhtari M.,Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center | And 19 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2013

The 2014 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia recommend quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) standardized to International Scale (IS) as the preferred method for monitoring molecular response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. A BCR-ABL1 transcript level of 10% or less (IS) is now included as the response milestone at 3 and 6 months. Change of therapy to an alternate TKI is recommended for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with imatinib. Continuing the same dose of TKI or switching to an alternate TKI are options for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with dasatinib or nilotinib. The guidelines recommend 6-month evaluation with QPCR (IS) for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% at 3 months. Monitoring with QPCR (IS) every 3 months is recommended for all patients, including those who meet response milestones at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months (BCR-ABL1 transcript level ≤10% [IS] at 3 and 6 months, complete cytogenetic response at 12 and 18 months). © JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.


Kulke M.H.,Dana Farber Brigham and Womens Cancer Center | Shah M.H.,Ohio State University | Benson A.B.,Northwestern University | Bergsland E.,University of California at San Francisco | And 24 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2015

Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a broad family of tumors that may or may not be associated with symptoms attributable to hormonal hypersecretion. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Neuroendocrine Tumors discuss the diagnosis and management of both sporadic and hereditary NETs. This selection from the guidelines focuses on sporadic NETs of the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, lung, and thymus. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. All rights reserved.


Benson A.B.,Northwestern University | Venook A.P.,University of California at San Francisco | Bekaii-Saab T.,Ohio State University | Chan E.,Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center | And 27 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2014

The NCCN Guidelines for Colon Cancer address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, perioperative treatment, posttreatment surveillance, management of recurrent and metastatic disease,and survivorship. This portion of the guidelines focuses on the use of systemic therapy in metastatic disease. The management of metastatic colorectal cancer involves a continuum of care in which patients are exposed sequentially to a variety of active agents, either in combinations or as single agents. Choice of therapy is based on the goals of treatment, the type and timing of prior therapy, the different efficacy and toxicity profiles of the drugs, the mutational status of the tumor, and patient preference. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc.


Coccia P.F.,Fred and Pamela Buffett Cancer Center | Pappo A.S.,University of Tennessee Health Science Center | Altman J.,Northwestern University | Bhatia S.,City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center | And 21 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2014

The NCCN Guidelines Insights on Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology discuss the fertility and endocrine issues that are relevant to the management of AYA patients with cancer. Fertility preservation should be an essential part in the treatment of AYA patients with cancer. The NCCN Guidelines recommend discussion of fertility preservation and contraception before the start of treatment. Oophoropexy and embryo cryopreservation are the 2 established options for fertility preservation in women. Semen cryopreservation before the start of treatment is the most reliable and well-established method of preserving fertility in men. AYA women with cancer also have unique contraception needs, depending on the type of cancer, its treatment, and treatment-related complications. Management of cancer during pregnancy poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for both the patient and the physician. AYA women diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy require individualized treatment from a multidisciplinary team involving medical, surgical, radiation, and gynecologic oncologists; obstetricians; and perinatologists. Copyright © 2014 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.


Daly M.B.,Fox Chase Cancer Center | Pilarski R.,Ohio State University | Axilbund J.E.,Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins | Buys S.S.,University of Utah | And 22 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2014

During the past few years, several genetic aberrations that may contribute to increased risks for development of breast and/ or ovarian cancers have been identified. The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian focus specifically on the assessment of genetic mutations in BRCA1/BRCA2, TP53, and PTEN, and recommend approaches to genetic testing/counseling and management strategies in individuals with these mutations. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines includes recommendations regarding diagnostic criteria and management of patients with Cowden Syndrome/ PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome. Copyright © 2014 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. All rights reserved.


Gradishar W.J.,Northwestern University | Anderson B.O.,University of Washington | Balassanian R.,University of California at San Francisco | Blair S.L.,University of California at San Diego | And 25 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2015

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the United States and is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death. The overall management of breast cancer includes the treatment of local disease with surgery, radiation therapy, or both, and the treatment of systemic disease with cytotoxic chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, biologic therapy, or combinations of these. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines discusses recommendations specific to the locoregional management of clinical stage I, II, and IIIA (T3N1M0) tumors. © JNCCN - Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.


Streiff M.B.,Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins | Bockenstedt P.L.,University of Michigan | Cataland S.R.,Ohio State University | Chesney C.,University of Tennessee Health Science Center | And 17 more authors.
JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network | Year: 2013

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains a common and life-threatening complication among patients with cancer. Thromboprophylaxis can be used to prevent the occurrence of VTE in patients with cancer who are considered at high risk for developing this complication. Therefore, it is critical to recognize the various risk factors for VTE in patients with cancer. Risk assessment tools are available to help identify patients for whom discussions regarding the potential benefits and risks of thromboprophylaxis would be appropriate. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for VTE provide recommendations on risk evaluation, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of VTE in patients with cancer. © JNCCN-Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

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