Bristol, United Kingdom
Bristol, United Kingdom

Frazer-Nash Consultancy is a professional services firm providing engineering, project management, and procurement advice. The company is based in Dorking, United Kingdom, and has ten other office locations around the country. It was founded in 1971 within the now-defunct Frazer-Nash Group, and is now fully owned by Babcock International Group plc. As of October 2014 it employed 600 people. Wikipedia.


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Kulka R.S.,Frazer Nash Consultancy
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Division (Publication) PVP | Year: 2011

During fracture toughness testing of SEN(B) specimens, an important assumption is that the test specimen is highly constrained. This assumption is ensured by the testing of a deeply cracked specimen, with in-plane and out-of-plane dimensions that are sufficient to guarantee an appropriate level of crack tip stress triaxiality. This condition guarantees that high-constraint fracture toughness values are derived, conservative for use in standard fracture mechanics assessments. In reality, many components have small in-plane or out-of-plane dimensions. It is considered that this could cause a reduction in crack tip constraint of a sufficient amount to increase the effective fracture toughness of the components. However, there is currently limited understanding as to the magnitude of the benefits that could be claimed. Finite element analysis of various thin-width SEN(B) specimens has been undertaken. The knowledge gained can be used to develop fracture mechanics methodology for the testing of thin-width specimens and the subsequent derivation of appropriate toughness values. Copyright © 2011 by ASME.


Kulka R.S.,Frazer Nash Consultancy
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Division (Publication) PVP | Year: 2011

In conventional fracture mechanics assessments, there is often an inadequate treatment of in-plane constraint effects on the apparent toughness of structural components, leading to significant conservatism. Modifications to the Master Curve method, to account for these effects, have previously been suggested. A study of these proposed modifications has identified that less conservative toughness estimates could be made from the analysis of fracture mechanics test specimens. An approach has been developed for allowing a comparison of a variation of fracture toughness values throughout a component, to a variation of the localised effective driving force. Cracked-body finite element analysis has been used to assess fracture test specimens with varying levels of in-plane constraint, to provide fracture mechanics data for use with the approach that has been developed. Copyright © 2011 by ASME.


Kulka R.S.,Frazer Nash Consultancy | Sherry A.H.,University of Manchester
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Pressure Vessels and Piping Division (Publication) PVP | Year: 2012

During fracture toughness testing of C(T) specimens, an important assumption is that the test specimen is highly constrained. This is ensured by testing a deeply cracked specimen, with in-plane and out-of-plane dimensions that are sufficient to guarantee an appropriate level of crack tip stress triaxiality. This condition guarantees that high-constraint fracture toughness values are derived, conservative for use in standard fracture mechanics assessments. In reality, many components have small out-of-plane dimensions (small thicknesses). This often causes a reduction in crack tip constraint of a sufficient amount to increase the effective fracture toughness of the components. However, there is currently limited understanding as to the magnitude of the benefits that could be claimed from out-of-plane constraint loss.Finite element and damage modelling of thin C(T) specimens under different loading conditions has been undertaken, looking at the effects of loss of out-of-plane constraint, to help validate the results of an on-going testing programme. When available, data from testing of thin C(T) specimens could allow the parameters of the damage model, based upon a ductile criterion, to be calibrated. Material resistance to fracture under different situations has been determined, leading to a correlation of toughness to the constraint condition for a nominal set of material parameters. Copyright © 2012 by ASME.


Chadwick A.,Frazer Nash Consultancy
RINA, Royal Institution of Naval Architects - International Maritime Conference 2012, Pacific 2012 | Year: 2012

The endless possibilities that the introduction of UAS into the maritime environment brings is slowly being recognised. The increase in operational use, and in the number of demonstrations of these systems, provides further evidence of how their capabilities may be used to fill capability gaps providing ISR for Force Projection and Force Protection, complementing manned aircraft in their agility, flexibility, and (in some cases) expendability. Integration and interoperability are key, and embarked UAS can provide a fast moving organic capability that deploys and tasks with speed, agility, control and precision. A capability that is independent of host nation support. There is now an expectation from the UAS community that UAS will form part of a nation's maritime air capability and that they have a role to play, both nationally and internationally. In addition, as the use of UAS proliferate, they will have more of a role to play in maritime security.


Reed D.,Frazer Nash Consultancy
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Engineering and Computational Mechanics | Year: 2013

For owners of everything from hotels to nuclear licensed sites, mitigating the potential risks of blast is of paramount importance, not only to minimise the risk to human life and in doing so discharge their legal obligations to reduce risks to as low as reasonably practicable, but also to ensure resilience in their enterprises. Identifying what design changes or mitigation measures need to be introduced in a given building is a complex task, and depends on the widely varying characteristics of the blast threat - whether caused by terrorist action or by accidents arising from process failures. This mitigation can be very costly; therefore, an accurate assessment of the potential damage can help ensure measures are taken appropriate to the level of risk. Frazer-Nash has recently been using high-end computer modelling techniques that allow the potential effects of a blast in a range of sensitive locations to be analysed, for the purposes of assuring hotel designers that their buildings will provide a suitable level of resilience to terrorist attack. This utilises techniques previously considered the preserve of the defence sector over the past two decades and more, using dynamic finite-element analysis to look at blast effects on a wide range of structures.


Frost P.A.,Frazer Nash Consultancy
18th European Conference on Fracture: Fracture of Materials and Structures from Micro to Macro Scale | Year: 2010

The R6 Revision 4 Procedure &Assessment of the lntegrity of Structures Containing Defects', states that the use of the finite element &global' limit load derived for pipe branch components can be non-conservative when used with the Option 1 and 2 failure assessment curves but that &local' limit loads, based on the spread of pl asticity through the pipe wall, should lead to conservative results. The current advice of R6 is based on separate studies by Fox and Connors of pipe branch components with fully extend ed surface defects. Their studies provide two distinct methods for calculating a suitably conservative local limit load. However, there is concern that these two methods may provide an overly conservative local limit load with therefore a less realistic prediction of defect tolerance. Furthermore, typical defectiveness is perhaps most commonly characterised as a semi-elliptic surface defect and it is therefore necessary to adapt both these methods in order to accommodate such defects. The purpose of the study was therefore to investigate local limit load approaches for pipe branch components having semi-elliptic surface defects. Local limit loads were calculated using two approaches. The first approach adapted the &Connors' method by applying an adjustment to allow for the semi-elliptic surface d efect? this is referred to as the &Modified Connors' approach. The second approach used cracked body finite element analysis and evaluated the local limit load by consideration of the onset of plasticity at the crack ligament. The global limit load was also derived from the cracked body finite element analysis. Assessment points were developed using global and l ocal limit loads, both obtained by cracked body finite element analysis, and also by u sing the &Modified Connors' local limit load approach. R6 Option 3 failure assessment curves were produced for each limit load approach in order to investigate the extent of any non-conservatism in the Option 1 and 2 failure assessment curves with the chosen limit load approach.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Small Business Research Initiative | Award Amount: 3.00K | Year: 2011

The public description for this project has been requested but has not yet been received.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 491.66K | Year: 2015

The worlds manufacturing economy has been transformed by the phenomenon of globalisation, with benefits for economies of scale, operational flexibility, risk sharing and access to new markets. It has been at the cost of a loss of manufacturing and other jobs in western economies, loss of core capabilities and increased risks of disruption in the highly interconnected and interdependent global systems. The resource demands and environmental impacts of globalisation have also led to a loss of sustainability. New highly adaptable manufacturing processes and techniques capable of operating at small scales may allow a rebalancing of the manufacturing economy. They offer the possibility of a new understanding of where and how design, manufacture and services should be carried out to achieve the most appropriate mix of capability and employment possibilities in our economies but also to minimise environmental costs, to improve product specialisation to markets and to ensure resilience of provision under natural and socio-political disruption. This proposal brings together an interdisciplinary academic team to work with industry and local communities to explore the impact of this re-distribution of manufacturing (RDM) at the scale of the city and its hinterland, using Bristol as an example in its European Green Capital year, and concentrating on the issues of resilience and sustainability. The aim of this exploration will be to develop a vision, roadmap and research agenda for the implications of RDM for the city, and at the same time develop a methodology for networked collaboration between the many stakeholders that will allow deep understanding of the issues to be achieved and new approaches to their resolution explored. The network will study the issues from a number of disciplinary perspectives, bringing together experts in manufacturing, design, logistics, operations management, infrastructure, resilience, sustainability, engineering systems, geographical sciences, mathematical modelling and beyond. They will consider how RDM may contribute to the resilience and sustainability of a city in a number of ways: firstly, how can we characterise the economic, social and environmental challenges that we face in the city for which RDM may contribute to a solution? Secondly, what are the technical developments, for example in manufacturing equipment and digital technologies, that are enablers for RDM, and what are their implications for a range of manufacturing applications and for the design of products and systems? Thirdly, what are the social and political developments, for example in public policy, in regulation, in the rise of social enterprise or environmentalism that impact on RDM and what are their implications? Fourthly, what are the business implications, on supply networks and logistics arrangements, of the re-distribution? Finally, what are the implications for the physical and digital infrastructure of the city? In addition, the network will, through the way in which it carries out embedded focused studies, explore mechanisms by which interdisciplinary teams may come together to address societal grand challenges and develop research agendas for their solution. These will be based on working together using a combination of a Collaboratory - a centre without walls - and a Living Lab - a gathering of public-private partnerships in which businesses, researchers, authorities, and citizens work together for the creation of new services, business ideas, markets, and technologies.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Small Business Research Initiative | Award Amount: 3.00K | Year: 2013

Awaiting Public Project Summary


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: FTIPilot-01-2016 | Award Amount: 4.27M | Year: 2016

OpenHydro holds a unique position in the tidal industry. It has developed a state-of-the-art Open-Centre Turbine with a proven ability to generate and deliver electricity to the national grid and a patented method to deploy and recover turbines quickly, safely and economically on the seabed. Simplicity is at the core of OpenHydros design philosophy: the turbine has only one moving part, minimising the number of interventions for maintenance. Fundamentally, the Open-Centre Turbine system is designed to deliver the lowest cost of energy. Since the installation of OpenHydros first turbine in 2006, the technology has been developed and tested extensively, with prototype designs optimised to provide higher outputs and improved economics. Validation of the full-scale, 2.0MW 16 metre turbine system following the deployment, grid connection and operation of a two turbine array at the Paimpol-Brhat test site in France brings the technology to TRL 7. OpenHydros stated objective is to match and beat the Levelised Cost of Energy (LCoE) of offshore wind. The OCTTIC FTI Pilot project, which brings together a consortium of 5 industrial partners led by OpenHydro, will achieve this through advancement of the turbine system design to improve performance, efficiency and reliability. These advancements when combined with a reduction in operational and maintenance requirements, will deliver significant reductions in capital and operational costs to achieve LCoE targets. OCTTIC will establish a robust industrial production platform and the associated supply chain to produce, assemble and deploy the turbines at scale to deliver LCoE targets and lead the development of the tidal energy market. The outputs of this project will be implemented immediately through the deployment of commercial tidal array projects in partnership with energy utilities to make significant contributions towards the decarbonisation of the European energy system and securing energy supply.

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