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Laure S.,Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | Leschinsky M.,Fraunhofer Center for Chemical Biotechnological Processes | Frohling M.,Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | Schultmann F.,Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | Unkelbach G.,Fraunhofer Center for Chemical Biotechnological Processes
Cellulose Chemistry and Technology | Year: 2014

The described work investigated ethanol-water fractionation of beech wood as the basic technology for a lignocellulose biorefinery. The main products were glucose, lignin and xylose. The fractionation technology was studied, scaled-up and successfully implemented on pilot scale. Based on an Aspen process simulation of an industrial production plant, the process was assessed economically and ecologically, pointing out the potential benefits of a "lignocellulose biorefinery" and the importance to valorize all the obtained fractions. The process assumptions of the assessment have been tested at the pilot plant and its feasibility was verified. Source


Schulze P.,Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems | Seidel-Morgenstern A.,Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems | Lorenz H.,Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems | Leschinsky M.,Fraunhofer Center for Chemical Biotechnological Processes | Unkelbach G.,Fraunhofer Center for Chemical Biotechnological Processes
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2016

An advanced process for lignin precipitation from organosolv spent liquors based on ethanol evaporation was developed. The process avoids lignin incrustations in the reactor, enhances filterability of the precipitated lignin particles and significantly reduces the liquor mass in downstream processes. Initially, lignin solubility and softening properties were understood, quantified and exploited to design an improved precipitation process. Lignin incrustations were avoided by targeted precipitation of solid lignin at specific conditions (e.g. 100 mbar evaporation pressure, 43 °C and 10% wt. of ethanol in lignin dispersion) in fed-batch operation at lab and pilot scale. As result of evaporation the mass of spent liquor was reduced by about 50% wt., thus avoiding large process streams. By controlled droplet coalescence the mean lignin particle size increased from below 10 μm to sizes larger than 10 μm improving the significantly filterability. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source

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