Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy

Tavernes de la Valldigna, Spain

Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy

Tavernes de la Valldigna, Spain
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Portillo Crespo M.A.,Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy | Villanueva Perales A.L.,University of Seville | Vidal-Barrero F.,University of Seville | Campoy M.,University of Seville
Fuel Processing Technology | Year: 2015

Abstract Gasification of biomass to syngas followed by catalytic conversion of syngas over mixed alcohol catalysts is an alternative pathway to produce bioethanol. Significant improvements in catalyst and process development need to be achieved to make this process commercially attractive. It is known that ethanol is produced from methanol by means of a CO insertion mechanism in the case of mixed alcohol MoS2 catalysts. Thus, an improvement in the industrial process could be to recycle methanol produced in the reactor. This paper examines experimentally the influence of methanol co-feeding for a wide range of methanol concentration in the feed at different reaction temperatures. The results reveal that CO conversion and productivity of ethanol and higher alcohol increase linearly with methanol concentration in the feed for a given reaction temperature, while hydrocarbon productivity increases exponentially. Therefore, there is a trade-off between increasing alcohol productivity and the selective conversion of methanol to alcohols. When the concentration of methanol in the feed changes from 0% to 8% mole concentration, ethanol and higher alcohol productivity increase more than two-fold. The addition of methanol has a positive influence in the ethanol selectivity only at low methanol content in the feed. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Ollero P.,University of Seville | Ollero P.,Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy | Ollero P.,Abengoa | Haro P.,University of Seville | And 14 more authors.
ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts | Year: 2011

This paper presents a techno-economic assessment of a BTL plant that processes 2140 dry tonne/day of poplar chips (500 MWHHV) to produce thermochemical ethanol from biomass via DME hydrocarbonylation. Biomass is gasified in an indirect circulating fluidized bed gasifier modeled with experimental correlations from the Battelle Columbus Laboratory Gasifier. After gas cleaning and conditioning, the indirect catalytic synthesis route to ethanol comprises three reaction steps: methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration to DME (both commercial technologies) and DME hydrocarbonylation to ethanol (a non-commercial process still under development). Data for the hydrocarbonylation reaction step were extracted from recent publications (Zhang, 2010). The technoeconomic assessment was done according to design and economic criteria accepted worldwide for BTL processes and imposing the condition that the whole process should be energy self-sufficient and "electrical energy neutral". Five simulation cases of varying CO-to-DME ratios in the hydrocarbonylation reactor were performed and evaluated. The results show that this is a promising indirect route that can achieve a minimum selling price (10% internal rate of return) of 0.735-0.802 USD2010/L of automotive grade ethanol with a fixed capital cost of 501-531 MM USD2010. Biomass-to-ethanol energy efficiency ranges from 43 to 45% on a high heating value basis (HHV).


Reyes Valle C.,Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy | Villanueva Perales A.L.,University of Seville | Vidal-Barrero F.,University of Seville | Gomez-Barea A.,University of Seville
Applied Energy | Year: 2013

The production of ethanol from biomass via steam-air indirect circulating fluidized bed gasification (iCFBG) and subsequent catalytic synthesis has been economically assessed. Current and future states of technology have been considered. In the current scenarios, several configurations are proposed based on the reforming technology selected (steam reforming, autothermal reforming, partial oxidation, catalytic tar reforming), and a patented MoS2 catalyst is selected as a state-of-the-art mixed alcohol catalyst. In the future scenario, the expected improvement of the MoS2 catalyst is examined. A plant size of 2140dry tonne/day of wood chips (500MWth) was considered with the criterion of being energy self-sufficient. The results are compared with a previous study based on entrained-flow gasification (EFG) and also with production of biochemical ethanol from agricultural residue, showing that iCFBG with partial oxidation is the most cost-competitive option for the current state of technology, with a minimum selling price of ethanol (including 10% rate of return) of 0.75$/L. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Villanueva Perales A.L.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Reyes Valle C.,Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy | Ollero P.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Gomez-Barea A.,Polytechnic University of Valencia
Energy | Year: 2011

The production of ethanol via entrained flow gasification of biomass and subsequent catalytic synthesis is economically assessed by considering current and future scenarios. In the current scenarios, the process plants proposed only make use of available technologies and state-of-the-art mixed alcohol catalysts (Rh-Mn/SiO2 and KCoMoS2 catalysts). In the future scenarios, the effects of improvements in MoS2 catalyst performance and the availability of pressurized solid biomass feeding systems are assessed. A plant size of 2140 dry tonnes/day of wood chip (500 MWth) is considered with the criteria of being energy self-sufficient. The economic results are discussed and also compared with state-of-the-art production of biochemical lignocellulosic ethanol.The results reveal that although the Rhodium catalyst presents better performance than MoS2 catalysts in terms of selectivity to ethanol, the high price of the Rhodium catalyst leads to higher production costs. For current catalysts, the minimum ethanol selling price (including 10% rate of return) is in the range of 0.90-1.25 $/L. In a future scenario, expected improvements in MoS2 catalyst performance would lead to a decrease in price to 0.71 $/L. Besides, if biomass piston feeders were commercially available, as an alternative for flash pyrolysis pre-treatment, the minimum ethanol selling price would decrease to 0.55 $/L. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Haro P.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Ollero P.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Villanueva Perales A.L.,Polytechnic University of Valencia | Reyes Valle C.,Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy
Energy | Year: 2012

In this study, a new thermochemical route to produce lignocellulosic ethanol based on DME (dimethyl ether) hydrocarbonylation is proposed and economically assessed. The process is designed and evaluated using current kinetic laboratory data for hydrocarbonylation reactions. Only available technologies or those expected to be available in the short term are considered for the process design, which involves biomass pretreatment and gasification (indirect circulating fluidized bed), gas clean-up and conditioning, methanol synthesis, DME production by methanol dehydration and DME hydrocarbonylation. The process is designed to be both energy self-sufficient and electrical energy neutral. For a plant size of 2140 dry tonnes/day of wood chip (500 MW HHV) the minimum selling price of ethanol (for a 10% rate of return and a biomass price of 66 $/dry tonne) ranges from 0.555 to 0.592 USD 2010/L of automotive grade ethanol with fixed capital costs between 333 and 352 M USD 2010. Energy efficiency of biomass to ethanol ranges from 44.35 to 45.53% (high heating value basis). These results compare favorably with the " state of the art" production of ethanol via biochemical pathway from lignocellulosic biomass, revealing that the DME hydrocarbonylation route is a promising one that could be cost-competitive in the near future. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

Loading Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy collaborators
Loading Foundation Advanced Technological Center for Renewable Energy collaborators