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Patent
Forus Health | Date: 2015-01-29

Embodiments of the present disclosure provide a photocoagulation device and a method to produce a light beam of a predefined wavelength using the photocoagulation device. The device comprises at least one light source, non-imaging light collimator (NILC), at least one first and second condenser, a ball lens and at least one galvo-mirror. The light source is one of light emitting diode (LED) and organic LED (OLED), which emits light of a predefined wavelength. The NILC collimates the light emitted by the at least one light source, the at least one first condenser produces a focused light beam using the collimated light. The at least one second condenser produces light spots, with a diameter in terms of microns, using the focused light beam from the at least one first condenser. The ball lens collimates the light spots, which is steered by the galvo-mirror to focus on a target area.


News Article | November 4, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Evaluated by a Jury comprising some of India's most respected entrepreneurs and investors including Ashok Soota of Happiest Minds, Amit Patni of RAAY Global Investments and K. Ganesh of Portea Medical, the 2016 Startup50 List features some of the best companies from across diverse sectors such as Enterprise Tech, Consumer Tech, Consumer Brand, Healthcare & Social Impact. The entrepreneurs at the helm of all these 50 companies have built wonderful businesses with long-term potential, robust financials and solid VC-backing. On the eve of The Smart CEO Startup50 Conference & Awards 2016, held at Taj West End, Bengaluru, the founders and first employees of 50 of India's most successful startups joined their peers in becoming a part of The Smart CEO Startup50 List of 2016 . Each of these 50 startups, spanning across diverse sectors and unique business models, was shortlisted from a pool of 450 nominations and evaluated by a top-notch Jury comprising Ashok Soota, Chairman, Happiest Minds Technologies, Amit Patni, Co-Founder & Chairman, Nirvana Venture Partners, Ganapthy Venugopal, Co-Founder & CEO of Axilor Ventures, Krishnan Ganesh, Partner at Growth Story, Shubhankar Bhattacharya, Venture Partner at Kae Capital and Naganand Doraswamy, the Managing Director & CEO of Ideaspring Capital. While enterprise tech startups such as ReConnect Energy, Flutura Technologies, Indix and Capital Float bagged the most awards, it was closely followed by companies in the Consumer Tech and Consumer Brand segment earning recognition for their works. Of course, the determining factor for making the cut was ticking the box on eight criteria; originality of idea, innovation of business model, long-term potential, revenue/profit growth, employee satisfaction, customer satisfaction, brand and social impact. For example, Jaypore Ecommerce, which hosts Indian crafts-based designs across apparel, jewellery, art and home accents, made it to the Startup50 List, under the Consumer Tech category, for building an e-commerce business, which turned profitable in its very first year of operations. Similarly, Triguni Foods, the makers of Magic Upma and Magic Biryani, framed in the Consumer Brand List for building a robust brand in the airline food segment. Some other categories where businesses with long-term potential, innovative business models and profitable growth were identified are; enterprise technology, social impact and healthcare. Additionally, special Awards were also handed out to three Startup50 Alumni Companies, Happiest Minds Technologies, Mitra Biotech and Forus Health for their sustained growth and recent, path-breaking initiatives in their respective sectors. The Smart CEO Startup50 Awards was initiated as an annual event, in 2015, to recognise and reward entrepreneurs who have built robust businesses with long-term potential, solid VC-backing and strong financials. While the 2015 List saw companies such as UrbanLadder, Freshdesk, Hippocampus, ChargeBee, TeaBox, Consure Medical and the like across education, enterprise tech, consumer tech and healthcare categories, the 2016 List comprises a fresh set of promising startups such as Uniphore Software Systems, Jaypore Ecommerce, Flutura Technologies, Niki.ai, Unacademy and Triguni Foods. Instead of being a mere day-long event where the winners will be honoured, The Smart CEO also created a platform where the winners of each year will become a cohort of sorts. On this front, it has launched three channels; the Startup50 Alumni Connect, where the winners of the 100 Series-A funded companies will stay connected to each other; the Startup50 Global Investor Connect Forum; where the 100 winners can network with Indian and global investors; The Startup50 YouTube Series; where the Conference & Awards Night will be featured over a series of 12 episodes; and the Startup50 Ratings; a methodology to rate and rank early-stage ventures. In keeping with its vision of empowering entrepreneurs, wantrepreneurs, middle and senior management professionals across India, with distinctive and timeless lessons on management and entrepreneurship, The Smart CEO hopes its Conference & Awards goes a step further in inspiring and encouraging many more such like-minded people to make India, Make in India. The Smart CEO is a widely read sector-agnostic digital + print platform where CEOs, entrepreneurs, investors and business leaders share unique perspectives and experiences from their journey. Its primary goal is to capture for our readers the thinking process of these leaders, get a peek into the decisions they make and why they make these decisions. In addition to The Smart CEO, it also operates and runs theThe Smart CEO Media Labs, a content services arm that specializes in creating custom, high-end content and content-driven marketing for clients. Its clients comprise Mahindra Group, Godrej & Boyce, Wealth Advisors, Veda Corporate Advisors, Altacit Global,Intellect Design Arena, Indium Software and several other growth companies in the country. Growth Mechanics also services global development agencies including IDA Ireland and Invest Maldives. For further queries, contact Prem Kumar S at prem@growthmechanics.in or Madhumita Prabhakar at Madhumita@growthmechanics.in


Non-tactile and non-evasive tonometer utilizing air flow with a definite amount of pressure to the eye and a mechanism to deflate the thin foil set that is placed near to eye ball such that re-bounded air hits on it. The mechanism involves acquiring or capturing then the images of the known pattern marking on thin foils both before and after deflating process due to rebounded air. On evaluating the deformation of the pattern appearing in the images obtained before and after air flow and calibrating the deformation with respect to size, translation, rotation and scaling parameters due the different pressure level that hits the eye ball and that rebounds on to thin foils, we arrive at a scheme of measuring the intraocular pressure of human eye. This intraocular pressure is used as a parameter for the ophthalmologist to diagnose glaucoma impairment of human beings.


Patent
Forus Health | Date: 2012-09-11

The present disclosure relates to image filtering techniques for enhancing image quality. In one embodiment, two filtering techniques are applied on an image. Firstly, an adaptive weighted median filtering operation is performed on an acquired low contrast image corrupted by impulsive noise. Subsequently, a guided image filtering on the image obtained from adaptive weighted median filtering operation to de-blur and enhance the contrast that ultimately assures to preserve the edges of the images. In addition, the image filtering for enhancing image quality is enhanced by several variations of data adaptive guided image filtering and adaptive window sizes for guided image filtering techniques.


Patent
Forus Health | Date: 2012-08-23

The embodiments herein provide a system and method for detecting and capturing a focused image. The system comprises of an image capturing unit, edge detection unit and a focusing unit. The image capturing unit obtains plurality of images sequentially. The edge detection unit identifies region of interest in each of the obtained images and calculates edge strength value for the identified regions. The edge detection unit determines peak edge value from the edge strength values. The edge strength value quantifies degree of focus in the identified region. If the identified region is more focused, the number of edges is relatively more when compared with out-of-focus region. The peak edge value indicates that the identified region is well focused. The focusing unit causes the image capturing unit to capture focused image when the edge strength value reaches a predefined value of the peak edge value.


Patent
Forus Health | Date: 2013-12-12

The present disclosure relates to method and apparatus for image recovery and image correction. In an embodiment, the present disclosure relates to recovering images that are occluded due to some material in the optical path while capturing the images. The detection of noisy region is performed by taking the residual image between the images yielded by large sized and small sized Gaussian window smoothening filters on red, green and blue channels. The recovery of the image that alleviates the noise is obtained by point-wise multiplication of the above said residue image with a suitably synthesized Gaussian distributed co-efficient of same size.


News Article | September 25, 2015
Site: www.washingtonpost.com

Silicon Valley often hosts world leaders, but rarely gives them the rock-star reception that it is planning for India prime minister Narendra Modi.  Seats for an 18,500-person event where he will be speaking, at the SAP Center in San Jose, disappeared within days, and tens of thousands more could have sold. The Indian community is abuzz with more excitement than when Bollywood troupes visit. Companies such as Google, Facebook, and Tesla are rolling out the red carpet. The euphoria arises partly because Indians here are still optimistic that Modi will transform India — after decades of economic stagnation under socialist governments. But his greater appeal to the tech community is due to his being one of the world’s few truly tech-savvy leaders. He has mastered social media and has more than 15 million followers on Twitter — second only to President Obama among world leaders.  And Modi has declared his intent to build a Digital India: a knowledge economy that delivers key government services electronically; all parts of the country are all connected with high-speed Internet networks; and the populace is digitally literate. Considering that India has already become the largest growth market for smartphones and will, by the end of this decade, add more than 500 million Internet users, it is not surprising that the CEOs of Microsoft, Google, Facebook, and Adobe are lining up to meet with Modi. They need to ensure that there be no regulatory roadblocks in India, which will have a market twice as large as the U.S. market.  But my hope is that it goes beyond the star power and that Modi gets to see the can-do attitude of Silicon Valley’s entrepreneurs. They are using exponentially advancing technologies such as sensors, artificial intelligence, robotics, medicine and 3D printing to change the world, and these technologies can also help transform India and uplift its population. Here are some examples of what is possible for India — and what Modi needs to support: Smart cities: Modi has talked a lot about smart cities, but what he refers to are cleaner and more efficient cities — not what we talk about in Silicon Valley. Using the advances in sensors, for example, it is possible to build technologically connected cities that monitor things such as traffic patterns, air quality, noise, radiation levels and water quality. These sensors can manage pollution, waste, parking, traffic congestion, security, and almost every other aspect of a city’s functioning. The cities won’t cost billions of dollars, as the original smart cities did that Middle East countries tried to build, but millions of dollars. Indian entrepreneurs can start building smart neighborhoods and then scale these up to the city level. Sharing economy: Uber showed Indian entrepreneurs that app-based ride-sharing was practical even in India’s chaotic cities.  But Uber targeted elite, high-end customers and got many things wrong. The bigger opportunities are to share rides in three-wheelers, bicycle rickshaws, and buses. Technology can also facilitate hiring of workers in the informal economy — laborers, technicians, maids, and painters — and tractor-sharing on farms; jhuggi rentals; bike-sharing; and seed swaps. Indian entrepreneurs are trying to build their own versions of these technologies; but they will need the government to streamline cumbersome regulations. Health apps, devices, and genomics: Medical devices as accurate as those that western hospitals use are now possible by connecting inexpensive sensors to smartphones and tablets. A few Indian start-ups have already created better and more practical technology than I have seen in Silicon Valley. Forus Health, for example, has developed a portable eye-screening device, called 3nethra, that can detect eye pathologies such as cataract, diabetic retinopathy, and cornea-related problems. Health Cubed has built inexpensive powerful medical devices that are in use on 2.5 million people in north India to measure blood pressure, blood sugar, heart rate, blood hemoglobin, and urine protein and to diagnose diseases such as HIV AIDS, syphilis, dengue, and malaria. MapMyGenome analyzes genome data to provide insights into the genetic bases of various aspects of individuals’ health, including traits, lifestyle, drug responses, inherited conditions, and diseases. Combining these technologies with telemedicine will enable hundreds of millions of villagers in India to receive timely and affordable health care. Education: No matter how hard it tries, India’s government will not be able to fix its public schools in time to educate the more than 100 million children in towns and villages that are without adequate educational facilities. The only solution lies in technology. The inexpensive smartphones that Indians are now buying can also be used for education: there are thousands of applications available today that can teach subjects such as history, geography, music, mathematics, and science. Indian entrepreneurs need to build versions of them in local languages and create adaptive educational technologies that tailor the learning path to the needs of the student. Government needs to revise its curriculum and work hand in hand with entrepreneurs to offer digital education as a backup to the failing schools. Agriculture: Technology is opening up possibilities for dramatically transforming India’s highly inefficient farms.  Sensors can be used to monitor soil humidity and optimize watering; aquaculture can be optimized with on-farm diagnostic technologies; dairy and farm production can be automated through CRM-like systems.  These can be connected to the smartphones that the farmers already have, and can also provide them with education and support. Turning children into innovators: Schoolchildren in Silicon Valley have the opportunity to play with 3D printers, robot-building kits, and sensor components. These printers and kits are not expensive. Providing every village with these will enable children to build robots that automate manufacturing, to design innovative new consumer products and to customize 3D designs for global consumers. Children can develop sensor-based systems for diverse industries, smart-city technologies, and new home-monitoring and -automation systems. Yes, children in villages can now build these technologies — and they will learn them faster than adults do. My hope is that Modi will take back with him a grand vision of the future; an understanding of what has become possible.  His challenge is to inspire Indian entrepreneurs to achieve to the same degree as their kin in Silicon Valley—who have risen to the top ranks of its technology companies and now start 16 percent of its new businesses.


News Article | October 4, 2015
Site: economictimes.indiatimes.com

Wipro announced in May that it will open a technology centre in Mountain View, California, to partner with startups in artificial intelligence and automation. And Infosys has just announced an investment in Palo Alto-based venture-capital firm Vertex Ven tures, "to boost its access to startups focused on disruptive technologies". Both companies seem to believe that setting up a Silicon Valley office or investing with a second-tier VC firm will help them survive the disruption their businesses face. They are sadly mistaken.To start with, successful startups in Silicon Valley see venture capital as a commodity. They pick and choose their investors and don't give them the time of day. Being a small part of a venture fund that has a tiny share of ownership in a startup will certainly not provide access to ideas or technology , and is a waste of money . It's an open secret that the majority of the Valley's unicorns (i.e., companies with billion-dollar valuations) are imploding. Infosys and Wipro are coming to the party when it is about to end; instead of restructuring and reinventing themselves as they need to do, they are chasing rainbows.The irony is that the biggest opportunities are actually at home. India added nearly 150 million internet connections via smartphones in 2014 and is the fastest-growing market in the world. By the end of this decade, virtually all of India will be online. This will allow it to leapfrog into the latest technologies and transform itself. Silicon Valley is beginning to recognize this opportunity; witness the rockstar reception that PM Modi received on his recent trip. Companies such as Apple , Tesla, Google , and Microsoft rolled out the red carpet because they see India as their market of largest growth.Indian entrepreneurs are also not very far behind their kin in the US. They are mastering rapidly advancing technologies such as computing, sensors, artificial intelligence, and robotics. In medicine, for example, K Chandrasekhar's Forus Health has de veloped a portable eye-screening device, called 3nethra, that can detect cataract, diabetic retinopathy , and cornea-related problems; Kanav Kahol has developed the Swasthya Slate, a health device with 33 sensors for measuring BP , blood sugar, heart rate, blood hemoglobin, and urine protein and for diagnosing diseases such as HIV AIDS, syphilis, dengue, and malaria. These technologies are better than any I have seen in Silicon Valley .In genomics, Anu Acharya's company, MapMyGenome, is performing world-class analysis of genomic data to provide insights into the genetic basis of many aspects of an individual's health, including traits, lifestyle, drug responses, inherited conditions, and diseases. Team Indus, founded by Rahul Narayan, in competition with companies that had been funded by American billionaires and supported by Nasa and leading universities, won a $1 million X Prize for its lunar lander. There are dozens of other startups in India that are building AI technologies, drones, and robots. Even a large player, inMobi, has, with its data analysis and advertising technologies, leapt ahead of Silicon Valley . The challenge Indian startups face is that Indian companies such as Wipro and Infosys don't take them seriously . As in the Hindi expression "ghar ki murgi dal barabar", they have an inferiority complex about anything Indian.Yet, as Chandrasekhar, Kahol, Acharya, and Narayan have shown, Indian entrepreneurs can surmount the obstacles. I expect that over the next few years, in addition to health devices and lunar landers, they will leverage technologies to build: z Digitally connected cities that monitor things such as traffic patterns, air quality, noise, radiation levels, and water quality , and manage pollution, waste, parking, traffic congestion, security , and almost every other aspect of a city's functioning. These can be built inexpensively using sensors and computers.z Sharing economies for products and services -to facilitate hire of labourers, technicians, maids, and painters and for tractor sharing on farms, jhuggi rentals, bike sharing, and seed swaps.z Applications to automate public services -for booking railway tickets and monitoring train arrival times, analysing government productivity and efficiency data, and providing virtually every other aspect of government services.z Digital tutors and learning apps to transform education through technology .z Precision agriculture -through CRM-like (customer-relations management) systems for logistics and production; sensors that monitor soil humidity and optimize watering and fertilizer usage; and applications for educating and connecting farmers.z Digital manufacturing plants using robots, AI, and 3D printers. Instead of replicating China's labourintensive and destructive manufacturing, India can leap forward by applying automation to such tasks.These are just a few of the areas in which technology will transform India and create billion-dollar opportunities, which is what India's IT industry should be looking at. These opportunities will help them reinvent themselves and they can then help western businesses make the same transition.


Accel Partners, the globally renowned VC fund known for backing companies like Facebook, Dropbox and others in the valley and Flipkart, BookMyShow and others in India has announced the launch of their new India fund, Accel India IV, a $305mn fund, dedicated to invest in very early stage Indian startups and to work closely with the Indian entrepreneurs to help build their businesses from the earliest days. Prior to this fourth fund, Accel had previously raised $155mn as part of Accel India III in 2011 and $60mn as part of Accel India Venture Fund II in 2008 right after the merger with Erasmic Venture Fund to form the current Accel Partners India. In its decade old existence in India, Accel has backed many startups that have now grown to become big brands like – BookMyShow, CommonFloor, Flipkart, Forus Health, FreshDesk, Mitra Biotech, MuSigma, Myntra, Power2SME, Proptiger and TaxiForSure. And have had successful exits with Myntra (acquired by Flipkart), TaxiForSure (acquired by Ola) and Virident (acquired by Western Digital). Speaking on the new fund launch, Subrata Mitra, Partner at Accel Partners shared with YourStory that the sector focus and investment philosophy of the new fund is going to remain the same as previous funds. With the infusion of large amount of capital from global investment firms like Softbank’s $210mn investment in Ola and $90mn in Housing.com, and Alibaba’s $575mn investment in One97 – it definitely shows that there is more interest in India from many large players for now. While few speculate it might be a bubble, Subrata shared that – they do believe in the Indian startup success stories, but he agrees that valuations have grown faster in the last few quarters than ever before. And at Accel their focus areas continues to be early stage tech, and he believes they’ll continue to be very unique for the kinds of companies they want to partner with. Fund raising is a daunting task be it for the entrepreneurs raising funds for their ventures or the partners raising investments for their new fund. Given the buzz created around the Indian startup space, was convincing the Limited Partners (LPs) for the new Accel India IV fund an easy job for the partners? Looks like the buzz did help a bit. Subrata shares – “At Accel, we’ve had the privilege of working with some of the most well-known & long-term LPs globally. That said, there was definitely more pull for India this time than ever before.” On the evolution of the Indian Startup space in the last decade, Subrata says – “The last decade has been quite a journey, and we at Accel feel privileged & excited to be a part of it. The ecosystem has changed significantly, in terms of kinds of companies being built, the age, agility & risk appetite of the entrepreneurs, and the number & quality of co-investors we work with. Good companies are starting to accelerate faster. Overall thought, we believe it’s still early and we would see more acceleration & interesting companies in the future.” And as advice to entrepreneurs on how they should choose the right VC or Investment partner, Subrata shares – “Really depends on the stage & kind of company that they want to build. We believe we do very well as hands-on partners, helping entrepreneurs decide on product/market fit, go-to market strategy, team building & initial scale, etc. One thing I do suggest to entrepreneurs is to do their own complete diligence on their potential VC or Investment partners.” This is the latest in the new fund announcements by Indian VCs which includes SAIF Partner’s $350mn new India fund launched earlier this year and Sequoia Capital’s $530mn India focused fund launched last year. The growth of smartphone usage in India seems to fuel the starting up of many Marketplace and Consumer Internet related ventures in India and we are seeing quite a bit of investment activity in these spaces as well. With many global players like Amazon and Alibaba also looking to have a piece of this action – it’s one of those good times to venture out and startup! Also read – Accel’s follow-on investment in Teabox along with JAFCO, Dragoneer and Keystone


News Article | March 9, 2015
Site: social.yourstory.com

It is worthwhile to understand how the vastness of social issues in India and relative projects to tackle them are developing. On March 11, the NASSCOM Foundation will host Technology for Good 2015 at MyBallroom, ITC My Fortune, gathering experts from different fields to show how technology is helping the social sector. The focus will be mainly on IT and communication based solutions – namely apps and process – and on how they apply to education, healthcare, financial inclusion, skills and training, agriculture and food supply, solutions for persons with disabilities and other sectors. Yourstory will be present at the event chairing the panel on ‘How to walk the talk: From innovation to enterprise’. Shradha Sharma will interact with six successful entrepreneurs who managed to combine business and social responsibility. The talk aims to highlight the story of each entrepreneur and build a narrative that portrays social entrepreneurship as a realistic avenue for creating a profitable business. These stories will hopefully inspire aspirant social entrepreneurs to embrace the challenge of innovation for the social good. The panel will include K. Chandrasekhar (CEO, Forus Health Pvt. Ltd.), Sean Blagsvedt (CEO, Babajobs.com), Unni Koroth (CEO, Foradian Technologies), Sameer Sawarkar (Co-founder and CEO, Neurosynaptic Communications Pvt Ltd), Anoj Vishwanathan (Co-founder, Milaap.org), and Harsha Mahabala (CEO, Edutel Technologies Pvt. Ltd). Click here for more information about the event.

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