Fortum Oyj is a Finnish energy company focusing on the Nordic and Baltic countries, Poland and Russia. President and CEO of the company is Tapio Kuula. Fortum operates power plants, including co-generation plants, and generates and sells electricity, heat and steam. In addition, it has stakes in gas companies Gasum in Finland and Eesti Gaas in Estonia. The company also provides other energy related services and products. Fortum is listed on NASDAQ OMX Helsinki stock exchange and shares the number one position in the Carbon Disclosure Project's Nordic climate index. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SCC-01-2014 | Award Amount: 34.64M | Year: 2015

GrowSmarter aims to: Improve the quality of life for European citizens by better mobility, housing and the quality of urban infrastructure while improving the citizens economy by lower energy costs and creating as much as 1500 new jobs (on the demonstration level). Reduce the environmental impact by lower energy needs by 60 % and increased use of renewable energy thus reducing GHG emissions even more. Create sustainable economic development by demonstrating and preparing a wider rollout of smart solutions. GrowSmarter will demonstrate at 3 lighthouse cities 12 smart, integrated solutions as a way of preparing for a wider market rollout. These solutions are integrated in specially chosen sites making demonstration easy to reach and take part of for the 5 follower cities and other European and international study groups. All the smart solutions are fit into the Lighthouse-cities strategic development plans and the follower cities replication plans. The solutions solve common urban challenges such as: Renewal of existing buildings. GrowSmarter demonstrates the cost efficient renewal of 100.000 square meters of Nearly Zero or low energy districts reducing energy demand by 70-90%, Integrated infrastructures for ICT, street lighting, smart grids district heating and smarter waste handling Sustainable urban mobility for both passenger and gods integrated in smart grids, biofuels from household waste thus reducing local air quality emissions by 60%. The integration of Cities, strong group of industrial partners together and quality research organisations guarantee that the solutions will be both validated by independent research organisations and transformed into Smart Business Solutions by industry for the wider rollout to Europe. Growsmarter builds on integrated, close to the market solutions, to form business models for their wider deployment by the industrial partners. The project will help Europe GrowSmarter!


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ECSEL-RIA | Phase: ECSEL-01-2014 | Award Amount: 30.14M | Year: 2015

The overall concept of MANTIS is to provide a proactive maintenance service platform architecture based on Cyber Physical Systems that allows to estimate future performance, to predict and prevent imminent failures and to schedule proactive maintenance. Maintenance is no longer a necessary evil that costs what it costs, but an important function that creates additional value in the business process as well as new business models with a stronger service orientation. Physical systems (e.g. industrial machines, vehicles, renewable energy assets) and the environment they operate in, are monitored continuously by a broad and diverse range of intelligent sensors, resulting in massive amounts of data that characterise the usage history, operational condition, location, movement and other physical properties of those systems. These systems form part of a larger network of heterogeneous and collaborative systems (e.g. vehicle fleets or photovoltaic and windmill parks) connected via robust communication mechanisms able to operate in challenging environments. MANTIS consists of distributed processing chains that efficiently transform raw data into knowledge while minimising the need for bandwidth. Sophisticated distributed sensing and decision making functions are performed at different levels in a collaborative way, ranging from local nodes to locally optimise performance, bandwidth and maintenance; to cloud-based platforms that integrate information from diverse systems and execute distributed processing and analytics algorithms for global decision making. The research addressed in MANTIS will contribute to companies assets availability, competitiveness, growth and sustainability. Use cases will be the testing ground for the innovative functionalities of the proactive maintenance service platform architecture and for its future exploitation in the industrial world. Results of MANTIS can be utilised directly in several industry areas and different fields of maintenanance.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: Fission-2013-1.1.2 | Award Amount: 14.73M | Year: 2013

The CAST project (CArbon-14 Source Term) aims to develop understanding of the generation and release of 14C from radioactive waste materials under conditions relevant to waste packaging and disposal to underground geological disposal facilities. The project will focus on releases from irradiated metals (steels, Zircaloys) and from ion-exchange materials as dissolved and gaseous species. A study to consider the current state of the art knowledge with regards to 14C release from irradiated graphite will also be undertaken, to further our knowledge from existing projects in this area i.e. CARBOWASTE. The scientific understanding obtained from these studies will then be considered in terms of national disposal programmes and impact on safety assessments. The knowledge gained from the whole of CAST will be disseminated within the project partners and to wider stakeholders and organisation, with a specific objective on education and training.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: SCC-01-2015 | Award Amount: 32.20M | Year: 2016

SmartEnCitys main Objective is to develop a highly adaptable and replicable systemic approach towards urban transformation into sustainable, smart and resource-efficient urban environments in Europe through the integrated planning and implementation of measures aimed at improving energy efficiency in main consuming sectors in cities, while increasing their supply of renewable energy, and demonstrate its benefits. The underlying concept of the proposal is the Smart Zero Carbon City concept, where city carbon footprint and energy demand are kept to a minimum through the use of demand control technologies that save energy and promote raised awareness; energy supply is entirely renewable and clean; and local energy resources are intelligently managed by aware citizens, as well as coordinated public and private stakeholders. This approach will be firstly defined in detail, laid out and implemented in the three Lighthouse demonstrators (Vitoria-Gasteiz in Spain, Tartu in Estonia and Sonderborg in Denmark). The three cities will develop a number of coordinated actions aimed at: Significant demand reduction of the existing residential building stock through cost-effective low energy retrofitting actions at district scale. Increase in RES share of energy supply, through extensive leveraging of local potentials. Enhance the use of clean energy in urban mobility, both for citizens and goods, by means of extensive deployment of green vehicles and infrastructure. An extensive use of ICTs is planned to achieve integration and consistency in demo planning and implementation, and to enable further benefits and secure involvement of citizens. These actions will be aligned to city-specific Integrated Urban Plans (IUPs), and the process will be replicated in two Follower cities: Lecce, (Italy), and Asenovgrad (Bulgaria) to ensure adaptability and maximize the project impact. Additionally, a Smart Cities Network will be setup to support project replication at European scale.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NFRP-01-2014 | Award Amount: 8.21M | Year: 2015

The stabilization of molten corium is recognised as essential if a safe and stable state is to be reached following a severe accident. Among the possible options, In-Vessel Melt Retention (IVMR) appears as an attractive solution that would minimize the risks of containment failure (less Hydrogen produced, no corium-concrete interaction), if it can be proved to be feasible. The strategy is already adopted for the VVER 440 type 213 based on thorough research work for the Finnish Loviisa NPP and Hungarian Paks NPP. It is also included in the design of some new Gen.III reactors like AP-1000, APR 1400 and Chinese CPR-1000. It has also been studied in the past for other reactor concepts like KERENA (BWR) or VVER-640. Current approaches for reactors with relatively small power, such as VVER 440 or AP600, use conservative assumptions. However, for higher power reactors (around 1000 MWe), it is necessary to evaluate the IVMR strategy with best-estimate methods in order to address the uncertainties associated with the involved phenomena. Additional R&D is needed to ensure and demonstrate adequate safety margins, including identification of efficient technical solutions for the external cooling of the vessel and performing best-estimate evaluation of relevant scenarios. Among other provisions, the possibility of cooling the corium inside the vessel by direct injection of water into the degraded core, may be considered because it is likely to remove a significant part of the residual power. The goal of the project is an analysis of the applicability and technical feasibility of the IVMR strategy to high power reactors, both for existing ones (e.g. VVER 1000 type 320 units) as well as for future reactors of different types (PWR or BWR). The main outcomes of the project will be elevant assumptions and scenarios to estimate the maximum heat load on the vessel wall, improved numerical tools for the analysis of IVMR issues and a harmonized methodology on the IVMR.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-03-2014 | Award Amount: 24.72M | Year: 2015

The most advanced wave power demonstrations today have showed the feasibility of power generation with single device deployments and MW-scale performance within several testing periods of several years. The next step beyond this is to deploy multiple wave energy converters in MW-scale with improved power generation capability and demonstrate that they are able to survive rough sea conditions over a period of several years. Clean Energy From Ocean Waves (CEFOW) project has an exceptionally good starting point. It has an existing site reservation in a wave power testing centre called Wave Hub, with all the needed infrastructure, including grid connection already in place. In addition, the wave energy converter technology to be deployed in the project has already been tested and proven in real conditions in Scotland. The ultimate purpose of the CEFOW is to increase the speed of wave power development, decrease the levelised cost of ocean energy by improving technical solutions used for multiple device system, and create an efficient supply chain to support larger wave power projects in the future. To reach these targets, the CEFOW consortium will improve the wave energy converter performance by 50% and raise its availability to 70%; develop new types of dynamic mooring and electrical connections suitable for multi-device deployment and deploy 3MW (three 1MW units) wave energy converters in real world offshore conditions in a grid-connected testing environment. In addition, CEFOW will study the feasibility of on-board and on-shore storage solutions and conduct thorough multi-year environmental, health and safety studies. The consortium spans the full value chain from research organisations to wave converter technology developers, marine service providers and a large multinational utility company as the operator.

Loading Fortum collaborators
Loading Fortum collaborators